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Prevalence and Correlates of Receiving Medical Advice to Increase Physical Activity in U.S. Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2016.
Am J Prev Med. 2019 06; 56(6):834-843.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

National objectives recommend healthcare professionals provide physical activity advice. This study examined health and demographic characteristics associated with receipt of medical advice to increase physical activity among U.S. health care-utilizing adults and differences in associations by age group.

METHODS

Analyses included 8,410 health care-utilizing adults aged ≥20 years from the 2013-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (analyzed in 2018). Logistic regression was used to examine associations between receipt of medical advice to increase physical activity in the past year and measured health conditions, reported health behaviors, and demographic characteristics. Models were stratified by age group (20-39, 40-59, and ≥60 years).

RESULTS

Physical activity medical advice was received by 42.9% (95% CI=40.8, 44.9) of adults overall. By age group, 32.7% of younger adults, 46.7% of middle-aged adults, and 48.9% of older adults received advice. Among all adults and across all age groups, receipt of advice was higher among adults with chronic health conditions: obesity (63.0%, 95% CI=60.3, 65.7), hypertension (56.5%, 95%=CI 53.8, 59.2), diabetes (69.8%, 95% CI=66.5, 72.8), hypercholesterolemia (55.6%, 95% CI=52.3, 59.0), and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (53.8%, 95% CI=50.1, 57.4). Among all adults, those with obesity, hypertension, and diabetes had significantly greater odds of receipt of advice after adjustment. Stronger associations between diabetes and hypercholesterolemia and receiving physical activity advice were observed among younger adults.

CONCLUSIONS

Receipt of physical activity medical advice was highest among adults with specific chronic health conditions, and this pattern was stronger among younger adults with diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. However, most health care-utilizing adults did not receive physical activity medical advice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland; U.S. Public Health Service, Rockville, Maryland. Electronic address: mzwald@cdc.gov.U.S. Public Health Service, Rockville, Maryland; NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland.Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland.Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland; U.S. Public Health Service, Rockville, Maryland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31003809

Citation

Zwald, Marissa L., et al. "Prevalence and Correlates of Receiving Medical Advice to Increase Physical Activity in U.S. Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2016." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 56, no. 6, 2019, pp. 834-843.
Zwald ML, Kit BK, Fakhouri THI, et al. Prevalence and Correlates of Receiving Medical Advice to Increase Physical Activity in U.S. Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2016. Am J Prev Med. 2019;56(6):834-843.
Zwald, M. L., Kit, B. K., Fakhouri, T. H. I., Hughes, J. P., & Akinbami, L. J. (2019). Prevalence and Correlates of Receiving Medical Advice to Increase Physical Activity in U.S. Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2016. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 56(6), 834-843. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2019.01.003
Zwald ML, et al. Prevalence and Correlates of Receiving Medical Advice to Increase Physical Activity in U.S. Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2016. Am J Prev Med. 2019;56(6):834-843. PubMed PMID: 31003809.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and Correlates of Receiving Medical Advice to Increase Physical Activity in U.S. Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2016. AU - Zwald,Marissa L, AU - Kit,Brian K, AU - Fakhouri,Tala H I, AU - Hughes,Jeff P, AU - Akinbami,Lara J, Y1 - 2019/04/17/ PY - 2018/08/13/received PY - 2019/01/09/revised PY - 2019/01/10/accepted PY - 2019/4/21/pubmed PY - 2020/6/17/medline PY - 2019/4/21/entrez SP - 834 EP - 843 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 56 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: National objectives recommend healthcare professionals provide physical activity advice. This study examined health and demographic characteristics associated with receipt of medical advice to increase physical activity among U.S. health care-utilizing adults and differences in associations by age group. METHODS: Analyses included 8,410 health care-utilizing adults aged ≥20 years from the 2013-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (analyzed in 2018). Logistic regression was used to examine associations between receipt of medical advice to increase physical activity in the past year and measured health conditions, reported health behaviors, and demographic characteristics. Models were stratified by age group (20-39, 40-59, and ≥60 years). RESULTS: Physical activity medical advice was received by 42.9% (95% CI=40.8, 44.9) of adults overall. By age group, 32.7% of younger adults, 46.7% of middle-aged adults, and 48.9% of older adults received advice. Among all adults and across all age groups, receipt of advice was higher among adults with chronic health conditions: obesity (63.0%, 95% CI=60.3, 65.7), hypertension (56.5%, 95%=CI 53.8, 59.2), diabetes (69.8%, 95% CI=66.5, 72.8), hypercholesterolemia (55.6%, 95% CI=52.3, 59.0), and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (53.8%, 95% CI=50.1, 57.4). Among all adults, those with obesity, hypertension, and diabetes had significantly greater odds of receipt of advice after adjustment. Stronger associations between diabetes and hypercholesterolemia and receiving physical activity advice were observed among younger adults. CONCLUSIONS: Receipt of physical activity medical advice was highest among adults with specific chronic health conditions, and this pattern was stronger among younger adults with diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. However, most health care-utilizing adults did not receive physical activity medical advice. SN - 1873-2607 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31003809/Prevalence_and_Correlates_of_Receiving_Medical_Advice_to_Increase_Physical_Activity_in_U_S__Adults:_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_2013_2016_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(19)30032-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -