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Sweat Loss and Hydration Habits of Female Olympic, Varsity and Recreational Ice Hockey Players.
Int J Sports Med 2019; 40(6):416-422IJ

Abstract

This study measured sweat losses, voluntary fluid intake, sodium balance, and carbohydrate intake of female ice hockey players during on-ice practices at the Olympic, varsity, and recreational levels. Testing was conducted on 25 Canadian Olympic players, 21 varsity, and 21 recreational players. The average sweat rate for the Olympic players (0.99±0.08 L/h) was significantly greater than both the varsity (0.67±0.05 L/h, p=0.001) and the recreational players (0.42±0.03 L/h, p<0.001), and the varsity players also had a significantly greater sweat rate than the recreational athletes (p=0.016). Total fluid intake was significantly greater for both the Olympic (p=0.001) and varsity players (p=0.007) compared to the recreational group. Only 3 of 25 Olympic players lost>1.5% BM and 4 others lost>1% BM, with no players in both the varsity and recreational teams losing>1% BM. Half of the Olympic players consumed some carbohydrate during practice, but most of the varsity and recreational players did not. In conclusion, sweat rates in female ice hockey players during practices were proportional to competitive level. Fluid intake was similar between groups and resulted in only a few athletes at the Olympic level being at risk of excess body mass loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.Human Kinetics, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Canada.Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31013534

Citation

Bigg, Jessica Lynne, et al. "Sweat Loss and Hydration Habits of Female Olympic, Varsity and Recreational Ice Hockey Players." International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 40, no. 6, 2019, pp. 416-422.
Bigg JL, Gamble ASD, Vermeulen TF, et al. Sweat Loss and Hydration Habits of Female Olympic, Varsity and Recreational Ice Hockey Players. Int J Sports Med. 2019;40(6):416-422.
Bigg, J. L., Gamble, A. S. D., Vermeulen, T. F., Boville, S. M., Eskedjian, G. S., Palmer, M. S., & Spriet, L. L. (2019). Sweat Loss and Hydration Habits of Female Olympic, Varsity and Recreational Ice Hockey Players. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 40(6), pp. 416-422. doi:10.1055/a-0877-7028.
Bigg JL, et al. Sweat Loss and Hydration Habits of Female Olympic, Varsity and Recreational Ice Hockey Players. Int J Sports Med. 2019;40(6):416-422. PubMed PMID: 31013534.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sweat Loss and Hydration Habits of Female Olympic, Varsity and Recreational Ice Hockey Players. AU - Bigg,Jessica Lynne, AU - Gamble,Alexander Shand Davis, AU - Vermeulen,Tyler Fredrick, AU - Boville,Stephanie Michelle, AU - Eskedjian,Greg S, AU - Palmer,Matthew Stephen, AU - Spriet,Lawrence L, Y1 - 2019/04/23/ PY - 2019/4/24/pubmed PY - 2019/7/3/medline PY - 2019/4/24/entrez SP - 416 EP - 422 JF - International journal of sports medicine JO - Int J Sports Med VL - 40 IS - 6 N2 - This study measured sweat losses, voluntary fluid intake, sodium balance, and carbohydrate intake of female ice hockey players during on-ice practices at the Olympic, varsity, and recreational levels. Testing was conducted on 25 Canadian Olympic players, 21 varsity, and 21 recreational players. The average sweat rate for the Olympic players (0.99±0.08 L/h) was significantly greater than both the varsity (0.67±0.05 L/h, p=0.001) and the recreational players (0.42±0.03 L/h, p<0.001), and the varsity players also had a significantly greater sweat rate than the recreational athletes (p=0.016). Total fluid intake was significantly greater for both the Olympic (p=0.001) and varsity players (p=0.007) compared to the recreational group. Only 3 of 25 Olympic players lost>1.5% BM and 4 others lost>1% BM, with no players in both the varsity and recreational teams losing>1% BM. Half of the Olympic players consumed some carbohydrate during practice, but most of the varsity and recreational players did not. In conclusion, sweat rates in female ice hockey players during practices were proportional to competitive level. Fluid intake was similar between groups and resulted in only a few athletes at the Olympic level being at risk of excess body mass loss. SN - 1439-3964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31013534/Sweat_Loss_and_Hydration_Habits_of_Female_Olympic_Varsity_and_Recreational_Ice_Hockey_Players_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/a-0877-7028 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -