Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Characterization of CA-MRSA TCH1516 exposed to nafcillin in bacteriological and physiological media.

Abstract

Cation adjusted-Mueller Hinton Broth (CA-MHB) is the standard bacteriological medium utilized in the clinic for the determination of antibiotic susceptibility. However, a growing number of literature has demonstrated that media conditions can cause a substantial difference in the efficacy of antibiotics and antimicrobials. Recent studies have also shown that minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests performed in standard cell culture media (e.g. RPMI and DMEM) are more indicative of in vivo antibiotic efficacy, presumably because they are a better proxy for the human host's physiological conditions. The basis for the bacterial media dependent susceptibility to antibiotics remains undefined. To address this question, we characterized the physiological response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of the beta-lactam antibiotic nafcillin in either CA-MHB or RPMI + 10% LB (R10LB). Here, we present high quality transcriptomic, exo-metabolomic and morphological data paired with growth and susceptibility results for MRSA cultured in either standard bacteriologic or more physiologic relevant medium.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.

    ,

    Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

    ,

    Collaborative Mass Spectrometry Innovation Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

    ,

    Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.

    ,

    Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.

    ,

    Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

    ,

    Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.

    ,

    Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

    ,

    Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

    ,

    Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

    ,

    Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

    ,

    Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.

    ,

    Collaborative Mass Spectrometry Innovation Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. Center for Microbiome Innovation, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

    ,

    Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

    ,

    Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA. Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. Center for Microbiome Innovation, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

    ,

    Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. Center for Microbiome Innovation, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

    ,

    Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA. Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, Building 220, 2800, Kongens, Lyngby, Denmark. Center for Microbiome Innovation, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

    Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA. afeist@ucsd.edu. Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, Building 220, 2800, Kongens, Lyngby, Denmark. afeist@ucsd.edu.

    Source

    Scientific data 6:1 2019 04 26 pg 43

    MeSH

    Anti-Bacterial Agents
    Bacteriological Techniques
    Culture Media
    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
    Microbial Sensitivity Tests
    Nafcillin
    Transcriptome

    Pub Type(s)

    Dataset
    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    31028276

    Citation

    Poudel, Saugat, et al. "Characterization of CA-MRSA TCH1516 Exposed to Nafcillin in Bacteriological and Physiological Media." Scientific Data, vol. 6, no. 1, 2019, p. 43.
    Poudel S, Tsunemoto H, Meehan M, et al. Characterization of CA-MRSA TCH1516 exposed to nafcillin in bacteriological and physiological media. Sci Data. 2019;6(1):43.
    Poudel, S., Tsunemoto, H., Meehan, M., Szubin, R., Olson, C. A., Lamsa, A., ... Feist, A. M. (2019). Characterization of CA-MRSA TCH1516 exposed to nafcillin in bacteriological and physiological media. Scientific Data, 6(1), p. 43. doi:10.1038/s41597-019-0051-4.
    Poudel S, et al. Characterization of CA-MRSA TCH1516 Exposed to Nafcillin in Bacteriological and Physiological Media. Sci Data. 2019 04 26;6(1):43. PubMed PMID: 31028276.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Characterization of CA-MRSA TCH1516 exposed to nafcillin in bacteriological and physiological media. AU - Poudel,Saugat, AU - Tsunemoto,Hannah, AU - Meehan,Michael, AU - Szubin,Richard, AU - Olson,Connor A, AU - Lamsa,Anne, AU - Seif,Yara, AU - Dillon,Nicholas, AU - Vrbanac,Alison, AU - Sugie,Joseph, AU - Dahesh,Samira, AU - Monk,Jonathan M, AU - Dorrestein,Pieter C, AU - Pogliano,Joseph, AU - Knight,Rob, AU - Nizet,Victor, AU - Palsson,Bernhard O, AU - Feist,Adam M, Y1 - 2019/04/26/ PY - 2018/11/16/received PY - 2019/03/07/accepted PY - 2019/4/28/entrez PY - 2019/4/28/pubmed PY - 2019/5/15/medline SP - 43 EP - 43 JF - Scientific data JO - Sci Data VL - 6 IS - 1 N2 - Cation adjusted-Mueller Hinton Broth (CA-MHB) is the standard bacteriological medium utilized in the clinic for the determination of antibiotic susceptibility. However, a growing number of literature has demonstrated that media conditions can cause a substantial difference in the efficacy of antibiotics and antimicrobials. Recent studies have also shown that minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests performed in standard cell culture media (e.g. RPMI and DMEM) are more indicative of in vivo antibiotic efficacy, presumably because they are a better proxy for the human host's physiological conditions. The basis for the bacterial media dependent susceptibility to antibiotics remains undefined. To address this question, we characterized the physiological response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of the beta-lactam antibiotic nafcillin in either CA-MHB or RPMI + 10% LB (R10LB). Here, we present high quality transcriptomic, exo-metabolomic and morphological data paired with growth and susceptibility results for MRSA cultured in either standard bacteriologic or more physiologic relevant medium. SN - 2052-4463 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31028276/Characterization_of_CA-MRSA_TCH1516_exposed_to_nafcillin_in_bacteriological_and_physiological_media L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41597-019-0051-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -