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Association between Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: An updated meta-analysis.
Metabolism. 2019 07; 96:56-65.M

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent studies that have examined the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have produced conflicting data. We have performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between H. pylori infection and risk of NAFLD.

METHODS

We searched PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases using predefined keywords to identify observational studies (published up to November 2018), in which NAFLD was diagnosed by histology, imaging or biochemistry. Data from selected studies were extracted and meta-analysis was performed using random-effects modeling. The statistical heterogeneity among studies (I2-index), subgroup analyses and the possibility of publication bias were assessed.

RESULTS

Thirteen observational (11 cross-sectional/case-control and 2 longitudinal) studies involving a total of 81,162 middle-aged individuals of predominantly Asian ethnicity (47.5% of whom had H. pylori infection diagnosed by urea breath test, faecal or serological tests) were included in the final analysis. Meta-analysis of data from cross-sectional and case-control studies showed that H. pylori infection was associated with increased risk of prevalent NAFLD (n = 11 studies; random-effects odds ratio [OR] 1.20, 95% CI 1.07-1.35; I2 = 59.6%); this risk remained significant in those studies where analysis was fully adjusted for age, sex, smoking, adiposity measures, diabetes or dyslipidemia (random-effects OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.07-1.32, I2 = 0%). Meta-analysis of data from longitudinal studies showed that H. pylori infection was also associated with increased NAFLD incidence (n = 2 studies; random-effects hazard ratio 1.14, 95% CI 1.05-1.23; I2 = 0%). Sensitivity analyses did not alter these findings. Funnel plot did not reveal significant publication bias.

CONCLUSIONS

H. pylori infection is associated with mildly increased risk of both prevalent and incident NAFLD in middle-aged individuals. More prospective studies, particularly in non-Asian populations, and mechanistic studies are required to better elucidate the link between chronic H. pylori infection and NAFLD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata of Verona, Verona, Italy.Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata of Verona, Verona, Italy.Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata of Verona, Verona, Italy.Department of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Nuovo Ospedale Sant'Agostino Estense di Baggiovara, Modena, Italy.Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata of Verona, Verona, Italy.Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; Translational Medicine - Department of Transfusion Medicine and Hematology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda - Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico Milano, Milan, Italy.Department of Internal Medicine I, Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Metabolism, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.Nutrition and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; Southampton National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: giovanni.targher@univr.it.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31047909

Citation

Mantovani, Alessandro, et al. "Association Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: an Updated Meta-analysis." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 96, 2019, pp. 56-65.
Mantovani A, Turino T, Altomari A, et al. Association between Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: An updated meta-analysis. Metabolism. 2019;96:56-65.
Mantovani, A., Turino, T., Altomari, A., Lonardo, A., Zoppini, G., Valenti, L., Tilg, H., Byrne, C. D., & Targher, G. (2019). Association between Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: An updated meta-analysis. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 96, 56-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2019.04.012
Mantovani A, et al. Association Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: an Updated Meta-analysis. Metabolism. 2019;96:56-65. PubMed PMID: 31047909.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: An updated meta-analysis. AU - Mantovani,Alessandro, AU - Turino,Teresa, AU - Altomari,Anna, AU - Lonardo,Amedeo, AU - Zoppini,Giacomo, AU - Valenti,Luca, AU - Tilg,Herbert, AU - Byrne,Christopher D, AU - Targher,Giovanni, Y1 - 2019/04/29/ PY - 2019/01/22/received PY - 2019/04/04/revised PY - 2019/04/16/accepted PY - 2019/5/3/pubmed PY - 2020/2/8/medline PY - 2019/5/4/entrez KW - Helicobacter pylori KW - Liver fat KW - Meta-analysis KW - NAFLD SP - 56 EP - 65 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metabolism VL - 96 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent studies that have examined the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have produced conflicting data. We have performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between H. pylori infection and risk of NAFLD. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases using predefined keywords to identify observational studies (published up to November 2018), in which NAFLD was diagnosed by histology, imaging or biochemistry. Data from selected studies were extracted and meta-analysis was performed using random-effects modeling. The statistical heterogeneity among studies (I2-index), subgroup analyses and the possibility of publication bias were assessed. RESULTS: Thirteen observational (11 cross-sectional/case-control and 2 longitudinal) studies involving a total of 81,162 middle-aged individuals of predominantly Asian ethnicity (47.5% of whom had H. pylori infection diagnosed by urea breath test, faecal or serological tests) were included in the final analysis. Meta-analysis of data from cross-sectional and case-control studies showed that H. pylori infection was associated with increased risk of prevalent NAFLD (n = 11 studies; random-effects odds ratio [OR] 1.20, 95% CI 1.07-1.35; I2 = 59.6%); this risk remained significant in those studies where analysis was fully adjusted for age, sex, smoking, adiposity measures, diabetes or dyslipidemia (random-effects OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.07-1.32, I2 = 0%). Meta-analysis of data from longitudinal studies showed that H. pylori infection was also associated with increased NAFLD incidence (n = 2 studies; random-effects hazard ratio 1.14, 95% CI 1.05-1.23; I2 = 0%). Sensitivity analyses did not alter these findings. Funnel plot did not reveal significant publication bias. CONCLUSIONS: H. pylori infection is associated with mildly increased risk of both prevalent and incident NAFLD in middle-aged individuals. More prospective studies, particularly in non-Asian populations, and mechanistic studies are required to better elucidate the link between chronic H. pylori infection and NAFLD. SN - 1532-8600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31047909/Association_between_Helicobacter_pylori_infection_and_risk_of_nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease:_An_updated_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(19)30084-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -