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Application of Individualized 3D-Printed Artificial Vertebral Body for Cervicothoracic Reconstruction in a Six-Level Recurrent Chordoma.
Turk Neurosurg. 2020; 30(1):149-155.TN

Abstract

AIM

To present the surgical planning, manufacturing and implantation of an individualized 3D-printed prosthesis for cervicothoracic reconstruction in a six-level recurrent chordoma.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

A 40-year-old female patient with recurrent cervicothoracic chordoma was admitted in our center. Onestage tumorectomy was performed using the combined anterior and posterior approach, and a customized 3D-printed prosthesis was anatomically installed on the defect with vertebral screws from C2 to T2.

RESULTS

The whole procedure took 13 hours, and intraoperative blood loss was 7500 mL. The patient recovered uneventfully, and symptoms of pain and weakness of right upper extremity were significantly diminished postoperatively. No local recurrence was found during 9-month follow-up, and no subsidence, displacement or fracture of the prosthesis was observed radiographically.

CONCLUSION

To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of biomechanical reconstruction using an individualized 3D-printed artificial vertebral body in a six-level recurrent chordoma. Customized design of the prosthesis helps to address the difficulty in fixation and simplify the surgical procedure. In the spinal transition point where solid fusion is hard to achieve, an individualized 3D-printed implant may exhibit excellent primary stability. Accordingly, this study believes that such burgeoning technique shows a promising prospect in complicated spinal oncology surgery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Second Military Medical University, Changzheng Hospital, Spine Tumor Center, Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Shanghai, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31049920

Citation

Yang, Xinghai, et al. "Application of Individualized 3D-Printed Artificial Vertebral Body for Cervicothoracic Reconstruction in a Six-Level Recurrent Chordoma." Turkish Neurosurgery, vol. 30, no. 1, 2020, pp. 149-155.
Yang X, Wan W, Gong H, et al. Application of Individualized 3D-Printed Artificial Vertebral Body for Cervicothoracic Reconstruction in a Six-Level Recurrent Chordoma. Turk Neurosurg. 2020;30(1):149-155.
Yang, X., Wan, W., Gong, H., & Xiao, J. (2020). Application of Individualized 3D-Printed Artificial Vertebral Body for Cervicothoracic Reconstruction in a Six-Level Recurrent Chordoma. Turkish Neurosurgery, 30(1), 149-155. https://doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.25296-18.2
Yang X, et al. Application of Individualized 3D-Printed Artificial Vertebral Body for Cervicothoracic Reconstruction in a Six-Level Recurrent Chordoma. Turk Neurosurg. 2020;30(1):149-155. PubMed PMID: 31049920.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Application of Individualized 3D-Printed Artificial Vertebral Body for Cervicothoracic Reconstruction in a Six-Level Recurrent Chordoma. AU - Yang,Xinghai, AU - Wan,Wei, AU - Gong,Haiyi, AU - Xiao,Jianru, PY - 2019/5/3/pubmed PY - 2020/8/7/medline PY - 2019/5/4/entrez SP - 149 EP - 155 JF - Turkish neurosurgery JO - Turk Neurosurg VL - 30 IS - 1 N2 - AIM: To present the surgical planning, manufacturing and implantation of an individualized 3D-printed prosthesis for cervicothoracic reconstruction in a six-level recurrent chordoma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A 40-year-old female patient with recurrent cervicothoracic chordoma was admitted in our center. Onestage tumorectomy was performed using the combined anterior and posterior approach, and a customized 3D-printed prosthesis was anatomically installed on the defect with vertebral screws from C2 to T2. RESULTS: The whole procedure took 13 hours, and intraoperative blood loss was 7500 mL. The patient recovered uneventfully, and symptoms of pain and weakness of right upper extremity were significantly diminished postoperatively. No local recurrence was found during 9-month follow-up, and no subsidence, displacement or fracture of the prosthesis was observed radiographically. CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of biomechanical reconstruction using an individualized 3D-printed artificial vertebral body in a six-level recurrent chordoma. Customized design of the prosthesis helps to address the difficulty in fixation and simplify the surgical procedure. In the spinal transition point where solid fusion is hard to achieve, an individualized 3D-printed implant may exhibit excellent primary stability. Accordingly, this study believes that such burgeoning technique shows a promising prospect in complicated spinal oncology surgery. SN - 1019-5149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31049920/Application_of_Individualized_3D_Printed_Artificial_Vertebral_Body_for_Cervicothoracic_Reconstruction_in_a_Six_Level_Recurrent_Chordoma_ L2 - http://www.turkishneurosurgery.org.tr/pubmed.php3?year=2020&volume=30&issue=1&page=149 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -