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A randomized trial to assess beverage hydration index in healthy older adults.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 06 01; 109(6):1640-1647.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The beverage hydration index (BHI) is a composite measure of fluid balance after consuming a test beverage relative to water. BHI is a relatively new measure that has been explored in young, but not yet older, adults.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to investigate potential differences in BHI between euhydrated younger and older adults after drinking 4 different commercial beverages. We hypothesized that 1) older subjects would remain in positive fluid balance longer than young subjects after ingestion of each test beverage due to decreased urinary excretion rates, 2) glucose (glu)- and amino acid (AA)-based hydration beverages with sodium would have a BHI greater than water in both groups, and 3) the traditional 2-h postingestion BHI may be inappropriate for older adults.

METHODS

On 5 separate visits, 12 young (23 ± 3 yr, 7 M/5F) and 12 older (67 ± 6 yr, 5 M/7F) subjects consumed 1 L of distilled water, G-20 (6% CHO, 20 mmol/L Na+), G-45 (2.5% CHO, 45 mmol/L Na+), AA-30 (5 AAs, 30 mmol/L Na+), or AA-60 (8 AAs, 60 mmol/L Na+) over 30 min. Blood and urine samples were collected before ingestion and at 0, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min postingestion with additional venous blood sampling at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min postingestion.

RESULTS

In young subjects, BHI increased with increasing beverage Na+ concentration, and AA-60 had the highest BHI (AA-60 = 1.24 ± 0.10 compared with water = 1.00, P = 0.01). For older subjects, BHI was highest in AA-30 (AA-30; 1.20 ± 0.13 compared with water, P < 0.01) and was still in flux beyond 2 h in AA-60 (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Beverage Na+ content progressively increased BHI in young adults independent of glucose or AA content. For older adults, the AA-30 beverage had the highest BHI. A 4-h BHI may be more appropriate for older adults due to attenuated urine excretion rates. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03559101.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM), Natick, MA.US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM), Natick, MA.Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31051498

Citation

Clarke, Megan M., et al. "A Randomized Trial to Assess Beverage Hydration Index in Healthy Older Adults." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 109, no. 6, 2019, pp. 1640-1647.
Clarke MM, Stanhewicz AE, Wolf ST, et al. A randomized trial to assess beverage hydration index in healthy older adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2019;109(6):1640-1647.
Clarke, M. M., Stanhewicz, A. E., Wolf, S. T., Cheuvront, S. N., Kenefick, R. W., & Kenney, W. L. (2019). A randomized trial to assess beverage hydration index in healthy older adults. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 109(6), 1640-1647. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqz009
Clarke MM, et al. A Randomized Trial to Assess Beverage Hydration Index in Healthy Older Adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 06 1;109(6):1640-1647. PubMed PMID: 31051498.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A randomized trial to assess beverage hydration index in healthy older adults. AU - Clarke,Megan M, AU - Stanhewicz,Anna E, AU - Wolf,S Tony, AU - Cheuvront,Samuel N, AU - Kenefick,Robert W, AU - Kenney,W Larry, PY - 2018/06/18/received PY - 2019/01/16/accepted PY - 2019/5/6/pubmed PY - 2020/2/6/medline PY - 2019/5/4/entrez KW - BHI KW - eGFR KW - healthy aging KW - net fluid balance KW - plasma volume SP - 1640 EP - 1647 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 109 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The beverage hydration index (BHI) is a composite measure of fluid balance after consuming a test beverage relative to water. BHI is a relatively new measure that has been explored in young, but not yet older, adults. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate potential differences in BHI between euhydrated younger and older adults after drinking 4 different commercial beverages. We hypothesized that 1) older subjects would remain in positive fluid balance longer than young subjects after ingestion of each test beverage due to decreased urinary excretion rates, 2) glucose (glu)- and amino acid (AA)-based hydration beverages with sodium would have a BHI greater than water in both groups, and 3) the traditional 2-h postingestion BHI may be inappropriate for older adults. METHODS: On 5 separate visits, 12 young (23 ± 3 yr, 7 M/5F) and 12 older (67 ± 6 yr, 5 M/7F) subjects consumed 1 L of distilled water, G-20 (6% CHO, 20 mmol/L Na+), G-45 (2.5% CHO, 45 mmol/L Na+), AA-30 (5 AAs, 30 mmol/L Na+), or AA-60 (8 AAs, 60 mmol/L Na+) over 30 min. Blood and urine samples were collected before ingestion and at 0, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min postingestion with additional venous blood sampling at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min postingestion. RESULTS: In young subjects, BHI increased with increasing beverage Na+ concentration, and AA-60 had the highest BHI (AA-60 = 1.24 ± 0.10 compared with water = 1.00, P = 0.01). For older subjects, BHI was highest in AA-30 (AA-30; 1.20 ± 0.13 compared with water, P < 0.01) and was still in flux beyond 2 h in AA-60 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Beverage Na+ content progressively increased BHI in young adults independent of glucose or AA content. For older adults, the AA-30 beverage had the highest BHI. A 4-h BHI may be more appropriate for older adults due to attenuated urine excretion rates. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03559101. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31051498/A_randomized_trial_to_assess_beverage_hydration_index_in_healthy_older_adults_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/nqz009 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -