Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The Effects of Computerized Cognitive Training With and Without Physical Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: An 8-Week Randomized Controlled Trial.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2020 03 09; 75(4):755-763.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Aging is characterized by cognitive changes in specific domains, such as declines in memory and executive functions. Given the world's aging population, it is important to identify and evaluate strategies that promote healthy cognitive aging. Besides exercise, computerized cognitive training (CCT) is a promising approach to promote cognitive function. Moreover, a single bout of exercise immediately prior to CCT may provide additional cognitive benefits.

METHODS

An 8-week proof-of-concept randomized controlled trial to investigate the effect of a commercial CCT intervention, alone and when preceded by exercise, on cognitive function. Participants (124; aged 65-85 years) performed 8 weeks of: (i) Group-based CCT (Fit Brains) 3×/week for 1 hour plus 3×/week home-based training; (ii) Group-based CCT preceded by exercise (Ex-CCT) 3×/week for 1 hour plus 3×/week home-based training (exercise+CCT); or (iii) Group-based balanced and toned (BAT) classes 3×/week for 1 hour (control). Memory was assessed by the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Executive functions were assessed using the: (i) Stroop Test, (ii) Trail Making Tests (TMT), (iii) Flanker Test, and (iv) Dimensional Change Card Sort Test (DCCS).

RESULTS

At trial completion, there were no significant between-group differences in memory (p > .05). However, compared with BAT, CCT, and Ex-CCT significantly improved Stroop performance (-10.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.53, -4.91; -7.95, 95% CI: -13.77, -2.13, respectively). Moreover, Ex-CCT significantly improved the performance on TMT (-13.65, 95% CI: -26.09, -1.22), the Flanker Test (6.72, 95% CI: 2.55, 10.88), and the DCCS Test (6.75, 95% CI: 0.99, 12.50).

CONCLUSION

An 8-week CCT program may promote executive functions in older adults and combining it with a bout of exercise may provide broader benefits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada. Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada.Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada. Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada.Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada. Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada.Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada. Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada.Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada. Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, British Columbia, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31054254

Citation

Ten Brinke, Lisanne F., et al. "The Effects of Computerized Cognitive Training With and Without Physical Exercise On Cognitive Function in Older Adults: an 8-Week Randomized Controlled Trial." The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 75, no. 4, 2020, pp. 755-763.
Ten Brinke LF, Best JR, Chan JLC, et al. The Effects of Computerized Cognitive Training With and Without Physical Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: An 8-Week Randomized Controlled Trial. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2020;75(4):755-763.
Ten Brinke, L. F., Best, J. R., Chan, J. L. C., Ghag, C., Erickson, K. I., Handy, T. C., & Liu-Ambrose, T. (2020). The Effects of Computerized Cognitive Training With and Without Physical Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: An 8-Week Randomized Controlled Trial. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 75(4), 755-763. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glz115
Ten Brinke LF, et al. The Effects of Computerized Cognitive Training With and Without Physical Exercise On Cognitive Function in Older Adults: an 8-Week Randomized Controlled Trial. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2020 03 9;75(4):755-763. PubMed PMID: 31054254.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Effects of Computerized Cognitive Training With and Without Physical Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: An 8-Week Randomized Controlled Trial. AU - Ten Brinke,Lisanne F, AU - Best,John R, AU - Chan,Joey L C, AU - Ghag,Cheyenne, AU - Erickson,Kirk I, AU - Handy,Todd C, AU - Liu-Ambrose,Teresa, PY - 2018/11/17/received PY - 2019/5/6/pubmed PY - 2021/1/9/medline PY - 2019/5/5/entrez KW - Clinical trials KW - Cognition KW - Cognitive aging KW - Executive functions SP - 755 EP - 763 JF - The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences JO - J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci VL - 75 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Aging is characterized by cognitive changes in specific domains, such as declines in memory and executive functions. Given the world's aging population, it is important to identify and evaluate strategies that promote healthy cognitive aging. Besides exercise, computerized cognitive training (CCT) is a promising approach to promote cognitive function. Moreover, a single bout of exercise immediately prior to CCT may provide additional cognitive benefits. METHODS: An 8-week proof-of-concept randomized controlled trial to investigate the effect of a commercial CCT intervention, alone and when preceded by exercise, on cognitive function. Participants (124; aged 65-85 years) performed 8 weeks of: (i) Group-based CCT (Fit Brains) 3×/week for 1 hour plus 3×/week home-based training; (ii) Group-based CCT preceded by exercise (Ex-CCT) 3×/week for 1 hour plus 3×/week home-based training (exercise+CCT); or (iii) Group-based balanced and toned (BAT) classes 3×/week for 1 hour (control). Memory was assessed by the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Executive functions were assessed using the: (i) Stroop Test, (ii) Trail Making Tests (TMT), (iii) Flanker Test, and (iv) Dimensional Change Card Sort Test (DCCS). RESULTS: At trial completion, there were no significant between-group differences in memory (p > .05). However, compared with BAT, CCT, and Ex-CCT significantly improved Stroop performance (-10.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.53, -4.91; -7.95, 95% CI: -13.77, -2.13, respectively). Moreover, Ex-CCT significantly improved the performance on TMT (-13.65, 95% CI: -26.09, -1.22), the Flanker Test (6.72, 95% CI: 2.55, 10.88), and the DCCS Test (6.75, 95% CI: 0.99, 12.50). CONCLUSION: An 8-week CCT program may promote executive functions in older adults and combining it with a bout of exercise may provide broader benefits. SN - 1758-535X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31054254/The_Effects_of_Computerized_Cognitive_Training_With_and_Without_Physical_Exercise_on_Cognitive_Function_in_Older_Adults:_An_8_Week_Randomized_Controlled_Trial_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/gerona/glz115 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -