Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A mathematical model for evaluating the role of trypanocide treatment of cattle in the epidemiology and control of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense sleeping sickness in Uganda.
Parasite Epidemiol Control. 2019 May; 5:e00106.PE

Abstract

Background

Human and animal African trypanosomiases impose a large economic and health burden in their endemic regions. Large strides have been made in the control of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), yet these efforts have largely focused on the non-zoonotic form of the disease. Using a mathematical model with a 10 year time horizon, we demonstrate the role of the cattle treatment with trypanocides in the epidemiology of zoonotic and non-zoonotic HAT in Uganda, and its potential implications on elimination and eradication of the disease.

Methodology/principal findings

We created two compartmental, deterministic models, each comprised of three sub-models: humans, the tsetse fly vector (Glossina fuscipes fuscipes), and cattle. We applied these models to two HAT foci in Uganda: the gambiense (chronic, non-zoonotic) form in the Northern Region, and the rhodesiense (acute, zoonotic) form in the Eastern Region. Parameters were derived from prior literature or assumed. In both foci we assumed G. fuscipes fuscipes expresses zoophilic biting behavior.With trypanocide treatment of cattle administered every 3 months, treatment in stage I (representing engagement in active or passive surveillance) had a larger impact on HAT burden than cattle treatment coverage. However increasing cattle treatment coverage allowed for further reduction in prevalence in both foci. Using these model parameters, our estimated R0 suggests humans cannot alone sustain the HAT epidemic in Uganda.

Conclusions/significance

Even in the absence of zoonotic transmission, loss of a preferred tsetse host species can affect HAT risk. Thus One Health strategies which integrate HAT and animal African trypanosomiasis control may improve the timeliness and sustainability of gHAT and rHAT elimination and eradication in Uganda. Furthermore, such strategies reduce the burden of a high-morbidity livestock disease of economic importance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. Center for One Health Research, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.Center for One Health Research, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31061906

Citation

Meisner, Julianne, et al. "A Mathematical Model for Evaluating the Role of Trypanocide Treatment of Cattle in the Epidemiology and Control of Trypanosoma Brucei Rhodesiense and T. B. Gambiense Sleeping Sickness in Uganda." Parasite Epidemiology and Control, vol. 5, 2019, pp. e00106.
Meisner J, Barnabas RV, Rabinowitz PM. A mathematical model for evaluating the role of trypanocide treatment of cattle in the epidemiology and control of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense sleeping sickness in Uganda. Parasite Epidemiol Control. 2019;5:e00106.
Meisner, J., Barnabas, R. V., & Rabinowitz, P. M. (2019). A mathematical model for evaluating the role of trypanocide treatment of cattle in the epidemiology and control of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense sleeping sickness in Uganda. Parasite Epidemiology and Control, 5, e00106. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parepi.2019.e00106
Meisner J, Barnabas RV, Rabinowitz PM. A Mathematical Model for Evaluating the Role of Trypanocide Treatment of Cattle in the Epidemiology and Control of Trypanosoma Brucei Rhodesiense and T. B. Gambiense Sleeping Sickness in Uganda. Parasite Epidemiol Control. 2019;5:e00106. PubMed PMID: 31061906.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A mathematical model for evaluating the role of trypanocide treatment of cattle in the epidemiology and control of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense sleeping sickness in Uganda. AU - Meisner,Julianne, AU - Barnabas,Ruanne V, AU - Rabinowitz,Peter M, Y1 - 2019/04/16/ PY - 2018/11/19/received PY - 2019/02/19/revised PY - 2019/04/13/accepted PY - 2019/5/8/entrez PY - 2019/5/8/pubmed PY - 2019/5/8/medline KW - AAT, animal African trypanosomiasis KW - AT, the African trypanosomiases (AAT and HAT) KW - Animal African trypanosomiasis KW - Cattle KW - HAT, human African trypanosomiasis KW - Human African trypanosomiasis KW - Mathematical modeling KW - One Health KW - Zoonoses KW - gHAT, gambiense HAT KW - rHAT, rhodesiense HAT SP - e00106 EP - e00106 JF - Parasite epidemiology and control JO - Parasite Epidemiol Control VL - 5 N2 - Background: Human and animal African trypanosomiases impose a large economic and health burden in their endemic regions. Large strides have been made in the control of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), yet these efforts have largely focused on the non-zoonotic form of the disease. Using a mathematical model with a 10 year time horizon, we demonstrate the role of the cattle treatment with trypanocides in the epidemiology of zoonotic and non-zoonotic HAT in Uganda, and its potential implications on elimination and eradication of the disease. Methodology/principal findings: We created two compartmental, deterministic models, each comprised of three sub-models: humans, the tsetse fly vector (Glossina fuscipes fuscipes), and cattle. We applied these models to two HAT foci in Uganda: the gambiense (chronic, non-zoonotic) form in the Northern Region, and the rhodesiense (acute, zoonotic) form in the Eastern Region. Parameters were derived from prior literature or assumed. In both foci we assumed G. fuscipes fuscipes expresses zoophilic biting behavior.With trypanocide treatment of cattle administered every 3 months, treatment in stage I (representing engagement in active or passive surveillance) had a larger impact on HAT burden than cattle treatment coverage. However increasing cattle treatment coverage allowed for further reduction in prevalence in both foci. Using these model parameters, our estimated R0 suggests humans cannot alone sustain the HAT epidemic in Uganda. Conclusions/significance: Even in the absence of zoonotic transmission, loss of a preferred tsetse host species can affect HAT risk. Thus One Health strategies which integrate HAT and animal African trypanosomiasis control may improve the timeliness and sustainability of gHAT and rHAT elimination and eradication in Uganda. Furthermore, such strategies reduce the burden of a high-morbidity livestock disease of economic importance. SN - 2405-6731 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31061906/A_mathematical_model_for_evaluating_the_role_of_trypanocide_treatment_of_cattle_in_the_epidemiology_and_control_of_Trypanosoma_brucei_rhodesiense_and_T__b__gambiense_sleeping_sickness_in_Uganda_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2405-6731(18)30091-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.