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Exploring why and how encounters with the Norwegian health-care system can be considered culturally unsafe by North Sami-speaking patients and relatives: A qualitative study based on 11 interviews.
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1612703.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Citizens of Norway have free and equal access to healthcare. Nurses are expected to be culturally sensitive and have cultural knowledge in encounters with patients. Culturally safe care is considered both a process and an outcome, evaluated by whether the patients feel safe, empowered and cared for, or not. All patients request equal access to quality care in Norway, also Sami patients.

OBJECTIVES

The aim of the study is to identify whether Sami patients and relatives feel culturally safe in encounters with healthcare, and if not, what are the main concerns.

METHODS

This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews in the North Sami language, with 11 North Sami participants.The transcribed data were analysed through a lens of cultural safety by content analysis.

FINDINGS

Data analysis explicated themes including: use of Sami language, Sami identity and cultural practices, connections to positive health outcomes to enhance cultural safe care and well-being for North-Sami people encountering the Norwegian health-care system.

CONCLUSION

Culturally safe practices at the institutional, group and individual levels are essential to the well-being of Sami people. An engagement in culturally safe practices will facilitate (or) fulfil political and jurisdictional promises made to the Sami people, consequently improving positive impact of healthcare.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Health and Care sciences , UiT The Arctic University of Norway , Hammerfest , Norway.a Department of Health and Care sciences , UiT The Arctic University of Norway , Hammerfest , Norway.a Department of Health and Care sciences , UiT The Arctic University of Norway , Hammerfest , Norway.b Aurora Research Institute , Aurora College , Yellowknife City , NWT , Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31072273

Citation

Mehus, Grete, et al. "Exploring Why and How Encounters With the Norwegian Health-care System Can Be Considered Culturally Unsafe By North Sami-speaking Patients and Relatives: a Qualitative Study Based On 11 Interviews." International Journal of Circumpolar Health, vol. 78, no. 1, 2019, p. 1612703.
Mehus G, Bongo BA, Engnes JI, et al. Exploring why and how encounters with the Norwegian health-care system can be considered culturally unsafe by North Sami-speaking patients and relatives: A qualitative study based on 11 interviews. Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019;78(1):1612703.
Mehus, G., Bongo, B. A., Engnes, J. I., & Moffitt, P. M. (2019). Exploring why and how encounters with the Norwegian health-care system can be considered culturally unsafe by North Sami-speaking patients and relatives: A qualitative study based on 11 interviews. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 78(1), 1612703. https://doi.org/10.1080/22423982.2019.1612703
Mehus G, et al. Exploring Why and How Encounters With the Norwegian Health-care System Can Be Considered Culturally Unsafe By North Sami-speaking Patients and Relatives: a Qualitative Study Based On 11 Interviews. Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019;78(1):1612703. PubMed PMID: 31072273.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exploring why and how encounters with the Norwegian health-care system can be considered culturally unsafe by North Sami-speaking patients and relatives: A qualitative study based on 11 interviews. AU - Mehus,Grete, AU - Bongo,Berit Andersdatter, AU - Engnes,Janne Isaksen, AU - Moffitt,Pertice M, PY - 2019/5/11/entrez PY - 2019/5/11/pubmed PY - 2020/1/30/medline KW - Cultural safety KW - Sami language KW - equality in healthcare KW - general practitioners KW - healthcare KW - indigenous KW - nursing SP - 1612703 EP - 1612703 JF - International journal of circumpolar health JO - Int J Circumpolar Health VL - 78 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Citizens of Norway have free and equal access to healthcare. Nurses are expected to be culturally sensitive and have cultural knowledge in encounters with patients. Culturally safe care is considered both a process and an outcome, evaluated by whether the patients feel safe, empowered and cared for, or not. All patients request equal access to quality care in Norway, also Sami patients. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study is to identify whether Sami patients and relatives feel culturally safe in encounters with healthcare, and if not, what are the main concerns. METHODS: This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews in the North Sami language, with 11 North Sami participants.The transcribed data were analysed through a lens of cultural safety by content analysis. FINDINGS: Data analysis explicated themes including: use of Sami language, Sami identity and cultural practices, connections to positive health outcomes to enhance cultural safe care and well-being for North-Sami people encountering the Norwegian health-care system. CONCLUSION: Culturally safe practices at the institutional, group and individual levels are essential to the well-being of Sami people. An engagement in culturally safe practices will facilitate (or) fulfil political and jurisdictional promises made to the Sami people, consequently improving positive impact of healthcare. SN - 2242-3982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31072273/Exploring_why_and_how_encounters_with_the_Norwegian_health_care_system_can_be_considered_culturally_unsafe_by_North_Sami_speaking_patients_and_relatives:_A_qualitative_study_based_on_11_interviews_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/22423982.2019.1612703 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -