Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Organotrophic acid-tolerant microorganisms enriched from an acid mine drainage affected environment as inoculum for microbial fuel cells.
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Aug 15; 678:639-646.ST

Abstract

Exoelectrogenic communities for bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are usually enriched from microbial consortia of municipal wastewater treatment plants and other circumneutral and mesophilic environments. Thus, the study of extreme environments offers an enormous potential to find new exoelectrogens and expand the functionality and applications of MFC technology. In this study, a microbial community previously enriched from acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments was used as inoculum in single-chamber MFCs operated at pH 3.7. The power obtained from the AMD-derived inoculum reached 1 mW m-2 (27.1 ± 7.8 mV with 1 kΩ external resistance), which compares to previous MFC studies operated under low-pH conditions. Additionally, polarization curves showed power-generation levels of 2.4 ± 0.2 mW m-2 and 0.4 ± 0.3 mW m-2, which were associated with the different inoculum sources: MFCs operated with sulfate concentrations of ~2000 and < 25 mg L-1, respectively. Microbial characterization performed at the end of the operation showed that both anodic and cathodic biofilm communities were highly dominated by the Proteobacteria phylum (>72% of 16S rRNA gene sequences), followed by Firmicutes (4-11%). Furthermore, the anodic microbial communities of the best-performing reactors were dominated by the Delftia genus (phylum Proteobacteria), which was recently identified as a taxon including exoelectrogenic candidates. These findings expand the literature of low-pH operated MFCs and acid-tolerant exoelectrogens, and also represent a starting point to apply this technology to treat acidic organic loads.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; CEDEUS, Centro de Desarrollo Urbano Sustentable, Chile.Departamento de Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Química, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.Departamento de Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; CEDEUS, Centro de Desarrollo Urbano Sustentable, Chile.Instituto de Ciencias Agronómicas y Veterinarias, Universidad de O'Higgins, Rancagua, Chile.Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.Departamento de Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; CEDEUS, Centro de Desarrollo Urbano Sustentable, Chile. Electronic address: itvargas@ing.puc.cl.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31078855

Citation

Leiva-Aravena, Enzo, et al. "Organotrophic Acid-tolerant Microorganisms Enriched From an Acid Mine Drainage Affected Environment as Inoculum for Microbial Fuel Cells." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 678, 2019, pp. 639-646.
Leiva-Aravena E, Leiva E, Zamorano V, et al. Organotrophic acid-tolerant microorganisms enriched from an acid mine drainage affected environment as inoculum for microbial fuel cells. Sci Total Environ. 2019;678:639-646.
Leiva-Aravena, E., Leiva, E., Zamorano, V., Rojas, C., Regan, J. M., & Vargas, I. T. (2019). Organotrophic acid-tolerant microorganisms enriched from an acid mine drainage affected environment as inoculum for microbial fuel cells. The Science of the Total Environment, 678, 639-646. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.003
Leiva-Aravena E, et al. Organotrophic Acid-tolerant Microorganisms Enriched From an Acid Mine Drainage Affected Environment as Inoculum for Microbial Fuel Cells. Sci Total Environ. 2019 Aug 15;678:639-646. PubMed PMID: 31078855.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Organotrophic acid-tolerant microorganisms enriched from an acid mine drainage affected environment as inoculum for microbial fuel cells. AU - Leiva-Aravena,Enzo, AU - Leiva,Eduardo, AU - Zamorano,Vasty, AU - Rojas,Claudia, AU - Regan,John M, AU - Vargas,Ignacio T, Y1 - 2019/05/02/ PY - 2019/03/11/received PY - 2019/04/28/revised PY - 2019/05/01/accepted PY - 2019/5/13/pubmed PY - 2019/8/14/medline PY - 2019/5/13/entrez KW - Acid mine drainage KW - Acid-tolerant microorganisms KW - Exoelectrogens KW - Microbial fuel cell KW - Pyrosequencing SP - 639 EP - 646 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci Total Environ VL - 678 N2 - Exoelectrogenic communities for bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are usually enriched from microbial consortia of municipal wastewater treatment plants and other circumneutral and mesophilic environments. Thus, the study of extreme environments offers an enormous potential to find new exoelectrogens and expand the functionality and applications of MFC technology. In this study, a microbial community previously enriched from acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments was used as inoculum in single-chamber MFCs operated at pH 3.7. The power obtained from the AMD-derived inoculum reached 1 mW m-2 (27.1 ± 7.8 mV with 1 kΩ external resistance), which compares to previous MFC studies operated under low-pH conditions. Additionally, polarization curves showed power-generation levels of 2.4 ± 0.2 mW m-2 and 0.4 ± 0.3 mW m-2, which were associated with the different inoculum sources: MFCs operated with sulfate concentrations of ~2000 and < 25 mg L-1, respectively. Microbial characterization performed at the end of the operation showed that both anodic and cathodic biofilm communities were highly dominated by the Proteobacteria phylum (>72% of 16S rRNA gene sequences), followed by Firmicutes (4-11%). Furthermore, the anodic microbial communities of the best-performing reactors were dominated by the Delftia genus (phylum Proteobacteria), which was recently identified as a taxon including exoelectrogenic candidates. These findings expand the literature of low-pH operated MFCs and acid-tolerant exoelectrogens, and also represent a starting point to apply this technology to treat acidic organic loads. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31078855/Organotrophic_acid_tolerant_microorganisms_enriched_from_an_acid_mine_drainage_affected_environment_as_inoculum_for_microbial_fuel_cells_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(19)32014-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -