Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

[Tropical Medicine in an Age of High Global Mobility - Schistosomiasis in a School Class after Travel to Rwanda].
Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2019 08; 144(17):e109-e113.DM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Schistosomiasis is one of the most common parasitic diseases worldwide. If left untreated, intestinal (Schistosoma mansoni, S. japonicum, S. mekongi) and urogenital (S. haematobium) chronic disease manifestations occur depending on the parasite load. The early phase however is characterized by fever and an immune-complex-mediated illness. Long-distance travel to tropical regions is on the rise, academic partnerships and humanitarian missions take even young people to developing countries.

METHODS

12 students from a German secondary school had fresh water exposure during a 14-day school trip to Rwanda in Lake Kivu in the west of the country. After returning to Germany, one of the students fell ill with acute schistosomiasis (Katayama syndrome), which led to examination of the other students. WBC, differential blood count, serology for schistosomal antibodies and ova detection in urine and stool were performed on first presentation and 6 and 12 months after therapy.

RESULTS

Positive antibody results indicated infection in all students, eosinophilia was found in 9 patients, ova of S. mansoni were detected in 3 cases. At presentation in our outpatient department 11 of the 12 students were asymptomatic. All patients received therapy with praziquantel.

DISCUSSION

Tropical diseases will further increase due to high global mobility. For their prevention and diagnosis physicians need to be sensitized beyond subject specific units. We describe an outbreak of schistosomiasis in a school class to sensitize physicians outside endemic areas. Since the disease is often asymptomatic a high number of unrecognized infections and illnesses can be assumed. When suspecting or treating schistosomiasis, a specialized center should always be consulted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Zentrum für Infektiologie, Sektion Klinische Tropenmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg.Zentrum für Infektiologie, Sektion Klinische Tropenmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg.Zentrum für Infektiologie, Sektion Klinische Tropenmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

ger

PubMed ID

31096278

Citation

Mickan, Christina, et al. "[Tropical Medicine in an Age of High Global Mobility - Schistosomiasis in a School Class After Travel to Rwanda]." Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift (1946), vol. 144, no. 17, 2019, pp. e109-e113.
Mickan C, Junghanss T, Stojkovic M. [Tropical Medicine in an Age of High Global Mobility - Schistosomiasis in a School Class after Travel to Rwanda]. Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2019;144(17):e109-e113.
Mickan, C., Junghanss, T., & Stojkovic, M. (2019). [Tropical Medicine in an Age of High Global Mobility - Schistosomiasis in a School Class after Travel to Rwanda]. Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift (1946), 144(17), e109-e113. https://doi.org/10.1055/a-0852-4783
Mickan C, Junghanss T, Stojkovic M. [Tropical Medicine in an Age of High Global Mobility - Schistosomiasis in a School Class After Travel to Rwanda]. Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2019;144(17):e109-e113. PubMed PMID: 31096278.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Tropical Medicine in an Age of High Global Mobility - Schistosomiasis in a School Class after Travel to Rwanda]. AU - Mickan,Christina, AU - Junghanss,Thomas, AU - Stojkovic,Marija, Y1 - 2019/05/16/ PY - 2019/5/17/pubmed PY - 2020/1/14/medline PY - 2019/5/17/entrez SP - e109 EP - e113 JF - Deutsche medizinische Wochenschrift (1946) JO - Dtsch Med Wochenschr VL - 144 IS - 17 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Schistosomiasis is one of the most common parasitic diseases worldwide. If left untreated, intestinal (Schistosoma mansoni, S. japonicum, S. mekongi) and urogenital (S. haematobium) chronic disease manifestations occur depending on the parasite load. The early phase however is characterized by fever and an immune-complex-mediated illness. Long-distance travel to tropical regions is on the rise, academic partnerships and humanitarian missions take even young people to developing countries. METHODS: 12 students from a German secondary school had fresh water exposure during a 14-day school trip to Rwanda in Lake Kivu in the west of the country. After returning to Germany, one of the students fell ill with acute schistosomiasis (Katayama syndrome), which led to examination of the other students. WBC, differential blood count, serology for schistosomal antibodies and ova detection in urine and stool were performed on first presentation and 6 and 12 months after therapy. RESULTS: Positive antibody results indicated infection in all students, eosinophilia was found in 9 patients, ova of S. mansoni were detected in 3 cases. At presentation in our outpatient department 11 of the 12 students were asymptomatic. All patients received therapy with praziquantel. DISCUSSION: Tropical diseases will further increase due to high global mobility. For their prevention and diagnosis physicians need to be sensitized beyond subject specific units. We describe an outbreak of schistosomiasis in a school class to sensitize physicians outside endemic areas. Since the disease is often asymptomatic a high number of unrecognized infections and illnesses can be assumed. When suspecting or treating schistosomiasis, a specialized center should always be consulted. SN - 1439-4413 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31096278/[Tropical_Medicine_in_an_Age_of_High_Global_Mobility___Schistosomiasis_in_a_School_Class_after_Travel_to_Rwanda]_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/a-0852-4783 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -