Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Causes and consequences of reciprocal translocations on sex chromosomes.
Mol Ecol 2019; 28(8):1863-1865ME

Abstract

Under XY sex determination, the Y chromosome is only inherited via males, whereas the X chromosome is predominantly found in females. Thus, it is favourable when alleles with high male fitness become associated with the Y chromosome and when alleles with high female fitness become associated with the X chromosome. These favourable associations can be strengthened through linkage. Rearrangements, such as inversions and sex chromosome-autosome fusions, can increase linkage and thereby become favoured (Charlesworth, 2017). In a From the Cover article in this issue of Molecular Ecology, Toups, Rodrigues, Perrin, and Kirkpatrick (2019) present the first genomic analysis of a sex chromosome reciprocal translocation, a particularly dramatic chromosomal rearrangement that modifies linkage with the sex chromosome. As a result of reciprocal translocation, one studied population of the common frog (Rana temporaria, Figure 1) displays a remarkable sex-determining system in which there are two physically unlinked sex chromosomes that are exclusively cotransmitted (Figure 2a).

Authors+Show Affiliations

UCL Genetics Institute, Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

News

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31099463

Citation

Scott, Michael F.. "Causes and Consequences of Reciprocal Translocations On Sex Chromosomes." Molecular Ecology, vol. 28, no. 8, 2019, pp. 1863-1865.
Scott MF. Causes and consequences of reciprocal translocations on sex chromosomes. Mol Ecol. 2019;28(8):1863-1865.
Scott, M. F. (2019). Causes and consequences of reciprocal translocations on sex chromosomes. Molecular Ecology, 28(8), pp. 1863-1865. doi:10.1111/mec.15064.
Scott MF. Causes and Consequences of Reciprocal Translocations On Sex Chromosomes. Mol Ecol. 2019;28(8):1863-1865. PubMed PMID: 31099463.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Causes and consequences of reciprocal translocations on sex chromosomes. A1 - Scott,Michael F, Y1 - 2019/05/05/ PY - 2019/01/31/received PY - 2019/02/23/revised PY - 2019/02/25/accepted PY - 2019/5/18/entrez SP - 1863 EP - 1865 JF - Molecular ecology JO - Mol. Ecol. VL - 28 IS - 8 N2 - Under XY sex determination, the Y chromosome is only inherited via males, whereas the X chromosome is predominantly found in females. Thus, it is favourable when alleles with high male fitness become associated with the Y chromosome and when alleles with high female fitness become associated with the X chromosome. These favourable associations can be strengthened through linkage. Rearrangements, such as inversions and sex chromosome-autosome fusions, can increase linkage and thereby become favoured (Charlesworth, 2017). In a From the Cover article in this issue of Molecular Ecology, Toups, Rodrigues, Perrin, and Kirkpatrick (2019) present the first genomic analysis of a sex chromosome reciprocal translocation, a particularly dramatic chromosomal rearrangement that modifies linkage with the sex chromosome. As a result of reciprocal translocation, one studied population of the common frog (Rana temporaria, Figure 1) displays a remarkable sex-determining system in which there are two physically unlinked sex chromosomes that are exclusively cotransmitted (Figure 2a). SN - 1365-294X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31099463/Causes_and_consequences_of_reciprocal_translocations_on_sex_chromosomes L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15064 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Unbound Prime app for iOS iPhone iPadUnbound PubMed app for AndroidAlso Available:
Unbound MEDLINE
Unbound PubMed app for WindowsUnbound PubMed app for MAC OSX Yosemite Macbook Air pro