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Vitamin C and Vitamin E Mitigate the Risk of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma from Meat-Derived Mutagen Exposure in Adults in a Case-Control Study.
J Nutr. 2019 08 01; 149(8):1443-1450.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies have found that meat-derived mutagens increase, and vitamin C or E decrease, the risk of pancreatic cancer.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to determine whether intake of vitamin C or E modulates the association between meat-derived mutagen exposure and risk of pancreatic cancer.

DESIGN

We conducted a case-control study in 1321 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 1061 healthy controls (aged 28-88 y). Cases and controls were frequency-matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Mutagen intake was assessed using a meat preparation questionnaire. Intakes of vitamin C, E, and other dietary components were assessed via a food-frequency questionnaire in a subset of 811 cases and 818 controls. ORs and 95% CIs were estimated in multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models.

RESULTS

The risk of PDAC was not associated with meat intake but was associated with consumption of well-done grilled or barbecued chicken (OR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.18, 2.09; P = 0.001). Intake of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline was associated with increased PDAC risk (Ptrend = 0.047). Participants in the highest, as compared with the lowest, quintile of 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (PhIP) intake experienced a 38% increased risk of PDAC (95% CI: 1.00, 1.90; P = 0.048). Intakes of total vitamin C or E from food and supplements or from supplements alone were each inversely associated with PDAC risk. Stratified analyses showed differential associations for PhIP intake and PDAC risk, such that risk increased among individuals with lower intake of vitamin C or E and decreased among those with higher vitamin intake. Significant interactions of dietary vitamin C, dietary vitamin E, and total vitamin E with PhIP intake were detected (Pinteraction = 0.023, <0.001, and 0.013, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Consistent with experimental evidence, this study of 811 cases and 818 controls has shown that high intake of dietary vitamin C or E mitigates the risk of PhIP-related PDAC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Houston, TX.Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Houston, TX.Department of Biostatistics, Houston, TX.Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31100111

Citation

Li, Donghui, et al. "Vitamin C and Vitamin E Mitigate the Risk of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma From Meat-Derived Mutagen Exposure in Adults in a Case-Control Study." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 149, no. 8, 2019, pp. 1443-1450.
Li D, Tang H, Wei P, et al. Vitamin C and Vitamin E Mitigate the Risk of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma from Meat-Derived Mutagen Exposure in Adults in a Case-Control Study. J Nutr. 2019;149(8):1443-1450.
Li, D., Tang, H., Wei, P., Zheng, J., Daniel, C. R., & Hassan, M. M. (2019). Vitamin C and Vitamin E Mitigate the Risk of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma from Meat-Derived Mutagen Exposure in Adults in a Case-Control Study. The Journal of Nutrition, 149(8), 1443-1450. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxz081
Li D, et al. Vitamin C and Vitamin E Mitigate the Risk of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma From Meat-Derived Mutagen Exposure in Adults in a Case-Control Study. J Nutr. 2019 08 1;149(8):1443-1450. PubMed PMID: 31100111.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin C and Vitamin E Mitigate the Risk of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma from Meat-Derived Mutagen Exposure in Adults in a Case-Control Study. AU - Li,Donghui, AU - Tang,Hongwei, AU - Wei,Peng, AU - Zheng,Jiali, AU - Daniel,Carrie R, AU - Hassan,Manal M, PY - 2019/02/04/received PY - 2019/02/12/revised PY - 2019/04/01/accepted PY - 2019/5/18/pubmed PY - 2020/4/9/medline PY - 2019/5/18/entrez KW - dietary mutagen KW - meat consumption KW - pancreatic cancer KW - vitamin C KW - vitamin E SP - 1443 EP - 1450 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 149 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous studies have found that meat-derived mutagens increase, and vitamin C or E decrease, the risk of pancreatic cancer. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether intake of vitamin C or E modulates the association between meat-derived mutagen exposure and risk of pancreatic cancer. DESIGN: We conducted a case-control study in 1321 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 1061 healthy controls (aged 28-88 y). Cases and controls were frequency-matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Mutagen intake was assessed using a meat preparation questionnaire. Intakes of vitamin C, E, and other dietary components were assessed via a food-frequency questionnaire in a subset of 811 cases and 818 controls. ORs and 95% CIs were estimated in multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models. RESULTS: The risk of PDAC was not associated with meat intake but was associated with consumption of well-done grilled or barbecued chicken (OR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.18, 2.09; P = 0.001). Intake of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline was associated with increased PDAC risk (Ptrend = 0.047). Participants in the highest, as compared with the lowest, quintile of 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (PhIP) intake experienced a 38% increased risk of PDAC (95% CI: 1.00, 1.90; P = 0.048). Intakes of total vitamin C or E from food and supplements or from supplements alone were each inversely associated with PDAC risk. Stratified analyses showed differential associations for PhIP intake and PDAC risk, such that risk increased among individuals with lower intake of vitamin C or E and decreased among those with higher vitamin intake. Significant interactions of dietary vitamin C, dietary vitamin E, and total vitamin E with PhIP intake were detected (Pinteraction = 0.023, <0.001, and 0.013, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with experimental evidence, this study of 811 cases and 818 controls has shown that high intake of dietary vitamin C or E mitigates the risk of PhIP-related PDAC. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31100111/Vitamin_C_and_Vitamin_E_Mitigate_the_Risk_of_Pancreatic_Ductal_Adenocarcinoma_from_Meat_Derived_Mutagen_Exposure_in_Adults_in_a_Case_Control_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/nxz081 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -