Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Questing Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) as a vector of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Borrelia miyamotoi in an urban area of north-eastern Poland.
Exp Appl Acarol 2019; 78(1):113-126EA

Abstract

Green areas located within large cities, as natural ecotypes, are a convenient habitat for ticks and their use as recreational areas is associated with the potential risk of acquiring tick-borne diseases. This study estimated the I. ricinus tick density, prevalence of infection with Borrelia species and the diversity of these bacteria in a green urban area (Olsztyn) of north-eastern Poland, an endemic region of tick-borne diseases. The ticks were collected during spring and autumn of 2015, at sites differing in the degree of human pressure and habitat. Borrelia species detection, typing and a molecular phylogenetic analysis were carried out based on the sequenced flaB gene. The overall mean abundance of I. ricinus was 2.0 ± 1.55 ticks per 100 m2. The density of I. ricinus did not vary significantly between sites. According to semi-qualitative tick abundance categories, the collection sites were classified as 'very low' and 'low' tick abundance category. The overall infection rate of I. ricinus with Borrelia spirochaetes was 27.4%. The infection rate of adult ticks (42.0%) was three times higher than with nymphs (14.3%). Based on the restriction patterns and sequencing, B. afzelii (93.1%; 27/29), B. valaisiana 3.5% (1/29) and B. miyamotoi (3.5%; 1/29), related to the relapsing fever (RF) spirochaetes, were detected. No co-infections were found. Borrelia miyamotoi, detected for the first time in ticks in the north-eastern urban areas of Poland, was identical to isolates described as European-type. The Borrelia spirochaete infection rate of I. ricinus ticks in an urban area indicated a high risk of LB. Physicians should also be aware of B. miyamotoi infections among patients with a history of tick-bites in north-eastern Poland.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Zolnierska 14c, 10-561, Olsztyn, Poland. katarzyna.kubiak@uwm.edu.pl.Department of Zoology, Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Oczapowskiego 2, 10-719, Olsztyn, Poland.Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Zolnierska 14c, 10-561, Olsztyn, Poland.Department of Microbiology and Mycology, Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Oczapowskiego 2, 10-719, Olsztyn, Poland.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology, University Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Oczapowskiego 1A, 10-719, Olsztyn, Poland.Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Zolnierska 14c, 10-561, Olsztyn, Poland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31102133

Citation

Kubiak, Katarzyna, et al. "Questing Ixodes Ricinus Ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) as a Vector of Borrelia Burgdorferi Sensu Lato and Borrelia Miyamotoi in an Urban Area of North-eastern Poland." Experimental & Applied Acarology, vol. 78, no. 1, 2019, pp. 113-126.
Kubiak K, Dziekońska-Rynko J, Szymańska H, et al. Questing Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) as a vector of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Borrelia miyamotoi in an urban area of north-eastern Poland. Exp Appl Acarol. 2019;78(1):113-126.
Kubiak, K., Dziekońska-Rynko, J., Szymańska, H., Kubiak, D., Dmitryjuk, M., & Dzika, E. (2019). Questing Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) as a vector of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Borrelia miyamotoi in an urban area of north-eastern Poland. Experimental & Applied Acarology, 78(1), pp. 113-126. doi:10.1007/s10493-019-00379-z.
Kubiak K, et al. Questing Ixodes Ricinus Ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) as a Vector of Borrelia Burgdorferi Sensu Lato and Borrelia Miyamotoi in an Urban Area of North-eastern Poland. Exp Appl Acarol. 2019;78(1):113-126. PubMed PMID: 31102133.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Questing Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) as a vector of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Borrelia miyamotoi in an urban area of north-eastern Poland. AU - Kubiak,Katarzyna, AU - Dziekońska-Rynko,Janina, AU - Szymańska,Hanna, AU - Kubiak,Dariusz, AU - Dmitryjuk,Małgorzata, AU - Dzika,Ewa, Y1 - 2019/05/17/ PY - 2019/01/16/received PY - 2019/05/13/accepted PY - 2019/5/19/pubmed PY - 2019/8/17/medline PY - 2019/5/19/entrez KW - Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex KW - Borrelia miyamotoi KW - Ixodes ricinus KW - Poland KW - Urban area SP - 113 EP - 126 JF - Experimental & applied acarology JO - Exp. Appl. Acarol. VL - 78 IS - 1 N2 - Green areas located within large cities, as natural ecotypes, are a convenient habitat for ticks and their use as recreational areas is associated with the potential risk of acquiring tick-borne diseases. This study estimated the I. ricinus tick density, prevalence of infection with Borrelia species and the diversity of these bacteria in a green urban area (Olsztyn) of north-eastern Poland, an endemic region of tick-borne diseases. The ticks were collected during spring and autumn of 2015, at sites differing in the degree of human pressure and habitat. Borrelia species detection, typing and a molecular phylogenetic analysis were carried out based on the sequenced flaB gene. The overall mean abundance of I. ricinus was 2.0 ± 1.55 ticks per 100 m2. The density of I. ricinus did not vary significantly between sites. According to semi-qualitative tick abundance categories, the collection sites were classified as 'very low' and 'low' tick abundance category. The overall infection rate of I. ricinus with Borrelia spirochaetes was 27.4%. The infection rate of adult ticks (42.0%) was three times higher than with nymphs (14.3%). Based on the restriction patterns and sequencing, B. afzelii (93.1%; 27/29), B. valaisiana 3.5% (1/29) and B. miyamotoi (3.5%; 1/29), related to the relapsing fever (RF) spirochaetes, were detected. No co-infections were found. Borrelia miyamotoi, detected for the first time in ticks in the north-eastern urban areas of Poland, was identical to isolates described as European-type. The Borrelia spirochaete infection rate of I. ricinus ticks in an urban area indicated a high risk of LB. Physicians should also be aware of B. miyamotoi infections among patients with a history of tick-bites in north-eastern Poland. SN - 1572-9702 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31102133/Questing_Ixodes_ricinus_ticks_(Acari,_Ixodidae)_as_a_vector_of_Borrelia_burgdorferi_sensu_lato_and_Borrelia_miyamotoi_in_an_urban_area_of_north-eastern_Poland L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10493-019-00379-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -