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Federal Monitoring of Dietary Supplement Use in the Resident, Civilian, Noninstitutionalized US Population, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Abstract

Objective

This review summarizes the current and previous data on dietary supplement (DS) use collected from participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), describes the NHANES dietary supplement database used to compute nutrient intakes from DSs, discussed recent developments and future direction, and describes many examples to demonstrate the utility of these data in informing nutrition research and policy.

Background and History

Since 1971, NHANES, has been collecting information on the use of DSs from participants. These data are critical to national nutrition surveillance and have been used to characterize usage patterns, examine trends over time, assess the percentage of the population meeting or exceeding nutrient recommendations, and to help elucidate the sources contributing nutrients to the diet of the US population.

Rationale

Over half of adults and about one-third of children in the United States use at least one dietary supplement in the past 30 days. Dietary supplements contribute to the dietary intake of nutrients and bioactive compounds in the US and therefore need to be assessed when monitoring nutritional status of the population and when studying diet-health associations.

Recent Developments

With the recent development and availability of the Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD), a comprehensive DS database that will eventually contain labels for all products marketed in the US, NHANES DS data will be more easily linked to product information to estimate nutrient intake from DS.

Future Directions

Over time, NHANES has both expanded and improved collection methods. The continued understanding of sources of error in collection methods will continue to be explored and is critical to improved accuracy.

Conclusions

NHANES provides a rich source of nationally representative data on the usage of dietary supplements in the US.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements, Bethesda MD.

    ,

    Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

    ,

    National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements, Bethesda MD.

    ,

    National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements, Bethesda MD.

    ,

    Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD.

    ,

    Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD.

    National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements, Bethesda MD. Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA.

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 148:Suppl 2 2018 08 pg 1436S-1444S

    MeSH

    Databases, Factual
    Dietary Supplements
    Federal Government
    Humans
    Nutrients
    Nutrition Surveys
    Patient Acceptance of Health Care
    Product Labeling
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    31105335

    Citation

    Gahche, Jaime J., et al. "Federal Monitoring of Dietary Supplement Use in the Resident, Civilian, Noninstitutionalized US Population, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 148, no. Suppl 2, 2018, 1436S-1444S.
    Gahche JJ, Bailey RL, Potischman N, et al. Federal Monitoring of Dietary Supplement Use in the Resident, Civilian, Noninstitutionalized US Population, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. J Nutr. 2018;148(Suppl 2):1436S-1444S.
    Gahche, J. J., Bailey, R. L., Potischman, N., Ershow, A. G., Herrick, K. A., Ahluwalia, N., & Dwyer, J. T. (2018). Federal Monitoring of Dietary Supplement Use in the Resident, Civilian, Noninstitutionalized US Population, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The Journal of Nutrition, 148(Suppl 2), 1436S-1444S. doi:10.1093/jn/nxy093.
    Gahche JJ, et al. Federal Monitoring of Dietary Supplement Use in the Resident, Civilian, Noninstitutionalized US Population, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. J Nutr. 2018;148(Suppl 2):1436S-1444S. PubMed PMID: 31105335.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Federal Monitoring of Dietary Supplement Use in the Resident, Civilian, Noninstitutionalized US Population, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. AU - Gahche,Jaime J, AU - Bailey,Regan L, AU - Potischman,Nancy, AU - Ershow,Abby G, AU - Herrick,Kirsten A, AU - Ahluwalia,Namanjeet, AU - Dwyer,Johanna T, Y1 - 2018/08/03/ PY - 2019/08/01/pmc-release PY - 2019/5/21/entrez PY - 2019/5/21/pubmed PY - 2019/7/4/medline KW - NHANES KW - dietary supplements KW - epidemiology KW - monitoring KW - nutrition databases KW - nutritional surveillance KW - supplement labels SP - 1436S EP - 1444S JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 148 IS - Suppl 2 N2 - Objective: This review summarizes the current and previous data on dietary supplement (DS) use collected from participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), describes the NHANES dietary supplement database used to compute nutrient intakes from DSs, discussed recent developments and future direction, and describes many examples to demonstrate the utility of these data in informing nutrition research and policy. Background and History: Since 1971, NHANES, has been collecting information on the use of DSs from participants. These data are critical to national nutrition surveillance and have been used to characterize usage patterns, examine trends over time, assess the percentage of the population meeting or exceeding nutrient recommendations, and to help elucidate the sources contributing nutrients to the diet of the US population. Rationale: Over half of adults and about one-third of children in the United States use at least one dietary supplement in the past 30 days. Dietary supplements contribute to the dietary intake of nutrients and bioactive compounds in the US and therefore need to be assessed when monitoring nutritional status of the population and when studying diet-health associations. Recent Developments: With the recent development and availability of the Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD), a comprehensive DS database that will eventually contain labels for all products marketed in the US, NHANES DS data will be more easily linked to product information to estimate nutrient intake from DS. Future Directions: Over time, NHANES has both expanded and improved collection methods. The continued understanding of sources of error in collection methods will continue to be explored and is critical to improved accuracy. Conclusions: NHANES provides a rich source of nationally representative data on the usage of dietary supplements in the US. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31105335/Federal_Monitoring_of_Dietary_Supplement_Use_in_the_Resident,_Civilian,_Noninstitutionalized_US_Population,_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/nxy093 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -