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Biofilm Assays on Fibrinogen-coated Silicone Catheters and 96-well Polystyrene Plates.
Bio Protoc 2019; 9(6)BP

Abstract

Biofilm formation is a well-known bacterial strategy that protects cells from hostile environments. During infection, bacteria found in a biofilm community are less sensitive to antibiotics and to the immune response, often allowing them to colonize and persist in the host niche. Not surprisingly, biofilm formation on medical devices, such as urinary catheters, is a major problem in hospital settings. To be able to eliminate such biofilms, it is important to understand the key bacterial factors that contribute to their formation. A common practice in the lab setting is to study biofilms grown in laboratory media. However, these media do not fully reflect the host environment conditions, potentially masking relevant biological determinants. This is the case during urinary catheterization, where a key element for Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus colonization and biofilm formation is the release of fibrinogen (Fg) into the bladder and its deposition on the urinary catheter. To recapitulate bladder conditions during catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), we have developed a fibrinogen-coated catheter and 96-well plate biofilm assay in urine. Notably, enterococcal biofilm factors identified in these in vitro assays proved to be important for biofilm formation in vivo in a mouse model of CAUTI. Thus, the method described herein can be used to uncover biofilm-promoting factors that are uniquely relevant in the host environment, and that can be exploited to develop new antibacterial therapies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida College of Dentistry, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida College of Dentistry, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31106237

Citation

Colomer-Winter, Cristina, et al. "Biofilm Assays On Fibrinogen-coated Silicone Catheters and 96-well Polystyrene Plates." Bio-protocol, vol. 9, no. 6, 2019.
Colomer-Winter C, Lemos JA, Flores-Mireles AL. Biofilm Assays on Fibrinogen-coated Silicone Catheters and 96-well Polystyrene Plates. Bio Protoc. 2019;9(6).
Colomer-Winter, C., Lemos, J. A., & Flores-Mireles, A. L. (2019). Biofilm Assays on Fibrinogen-coated Silicone Catheters and 96-well Polystyrene Plates. Bio-protocol, 9(6), doi:10.21769/BioProtoc.3196.
Colomer-Winter C, Lemos JA, Flores-Mireles AL. Biofilm Assays On Fibrinogen-coated Silicone Catheters and 96-well Polystyrene Plates. Bio Protoc. 2019 Mar 20;9(6) PubMed PMID: 31106237.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Biofilm Assays on Fibrinogen-coated Silicone Catheters and 96-well Polystyrene Plates. AU - Colomer-Winter,Cristina, AU - Lemos,José A, AU - Flores-Mireles,Ana L, PY - 2019/5/21/entrez PY - 2019/5/21/pubmed PY - 2019/5/21/medline KW - Biofilm KW - CAUTI KW - Catheter KW - Enterococcus faecalis KW - Fibrinogen KW - Infection KW - Urine JF - Bio-protocol JO - Bio Protoc VL - 9 IS - 6 N2 - Biofilm formation is a well-known bacterial strategy that protects cells from hostile environments. During infection, bacteria found in a biofilm community are less sensitive to antibiotics and to the immune response, often allowing them to colonize and persist in the host niche. Not surprisingly, biofilm formation on medical devices, such as urinary catheters, is a major problem in hospital settings. To be able to eliminate such biofilms, it is important to understand the key bacterial factors that contribute to their formation. A common practice in the lab setting is to study biofilms grown in laboratory media. However, these media do not fully reflect the host environment conditions, potentially masking relevant biological determinants. This is the case during urinary catheterization, where a key element for Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus colonization and biofilm formation is the release of fibrinogen (Fg) into the bladder and its deposition on the urinary catheter. To recapitulate bladder conditions during catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), we have developed a fibrinogen-coated catheter and 96-well plate biofilm assay in urine. Notably, enterococcal biofilm factors identified in these in vitro assays proved to be important for biofilm formation in vivo in a mouse model of CAUTI. Thus, the method described herein can be used to uncover biofilm-promoting factors that are uniquely relevant in the host environment, and that can be exploited to develop new antibacterial therapies. SN - 2331-8325 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31106237/Biofilm_Assays_on_Fibrinogen-coated_Silicone_Catheters_and_96-well_Polystyrene_Plates L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/31106237/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -