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Unraveling the Origin and Mechanism of Nanofilament Formation in Polycrystalline SrTiO3 Resistive Switching Memories.
Adv Mater 2019; 31(28):e1901322AM

Abstract

Three central themes in the study of the phenomenon of resistive switching are the nature of the conducting phase, why it forms, and how it forms. In this study, the answers to all three questions are provided by performing switching experiments in situ in a transmission electron microscope on thin films of the model system polycrystalline SrTiO3 . On the basis of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and in situ current-voltage measurements, the conducting phase is identified to be SrTi11 O20 . This phase is only observed at specific grain boundaries, and a Ruddlesden-Popper phase, Sr3 Ti2 O7 , is typically observed adjacent to the conducting phase. These results allow not only the proposal that filament formation in this system has a thermodynamic origin-it is driven by electrochemical polarization and the local oxygen activity in the film decreasing below a critical value-but also the deduction of a phase diagram for strongly reduced SrTiO3 . Furthermore, why many conducting filaments are nucleated at one electrode but only one filament wins the race to the opposite electrode is also explained. The work thus provides detailed insights into the origin and mechanisms of filament generation and rupture.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Emerging Materials Science, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu, 42988, Republic of Korea. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Center for Correlated Electron Systems, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.Institute of Physical Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, 52074, Germany.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Institute of Physical Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, 52074, Germany.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Center for Correlated Electron Systems, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31106484

Citation

Kwon, Deok-Hwang, et al. "Unraveling the Origin and Mechanism of Nanofilament Formation in Polycrystalline SrTiO3 Resistive Switching Memories." Advanced Materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.), vol. 31, no. 28, 2019, pp. e1901322.
Kwon DH, Lee S, Kang CS, et al. Unraveling the Origin and Mechanism of Nanofilament Formation in Polycrystalline SrTiO3 Resistive Switching Memories. Adv Mater Weinheim. 2019;31(28):e1901322.
Kwon, D. H., Lee, S., Kang, C. S., Choi, Y. S., Kang, S. J., Cho, H. L., ... Kim, M. (2019). Unraveling the Origin and Mechanism of Nanofilament Formation in Polycrystalline SrTiO3 Resistive Switching Memories. Advanced Materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.), 31(28), pp. e1901322. doi:10.1002/adma.201901322.
Kwon DH, et al. Unraveling the Origin and Mechanism of Nanofilament Formation in Polycrystalline SrTiO3 Resistive Switching Memories. Adv Mater Weinheim. 2019;31(28):e1901322. PubMed PMID: 31106484.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unraveling the Origin and Mechanism of Nanofilament Formation in Polycrystalline SrTiO3 Resistive Switching Memories. AU - Kwon,Deok-Hwang, AU - Lee,Shinbuhm, AU - Kang,Chan Soon, AU - Choi,Yong Seok, AU - Kang,Sung Jin, AU - Cho,Hae Lim, AU - Sohn,Woonbae, AU - Jo,Janghyun, AU - Lee,Seung-Yong, AU - Oh,Kyu Hwan, AU - Noh,Tae Won, AU - De Souza,Roger A, AU - Martin,Manfred, AU - Kim,Miyoung, Y1 - 2019/05/20/ PY - 2019/02/27/received PY - 2019/5/21/pubmed PY - 2019/5/21/medline PY - 2019/5/21/entrez KW - memristors KW - nanofilaments KW - resistive switching KW - transmission electron microscopy (TEM) SP - e1901322 EP - e1901322 JF - Advanced materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.) JO - Adv. Mater. Weinheim VL - 31 IS - 28 N2 - Three central themes in the study of the phenomenon of resistive switching are the nature of the conducting phase, why it forms, and how it forms. In this study, the answers to all three questions are provided by performing switching experiments in situ in a transmission electron microscope on thin films of the model system polycrystalline SrTiO3 . On the basis of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and in situ current-voltage measurements, the conducting phase is identified to be SrTi11 O20 . This phase is only observed at specific grain boundaries, and a Ruddlesden-Popper phase, Sr3 Ti2 O7 , is typically observed adjacent to the conducting phase. These results allow not only the proposal that filament formation in this system has a thermodynamic origin-it is driven by electrochemical polarization and the local oxygen activity in the film decreasing below a critical value-but also the deduction of a phase diagram for strongly reduced SrTiO3 . Furthermore, why many conducting filaments are nucleated at one electrode but only one filament wins the race to the opposite electrode is also explained. The work thus provides detailed insights into the origin and mechanisms of filament generation and rupture. SN - 1521-4095 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31106484/Unraveling_the_Origin_and_Mechanism_of_Nanofilament_Formation_in_Polycrystalline_SrTiO3_Resistive-Switching_Memories L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201901322 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -