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Growth and cellular patterning during fetal human inner ear development studied by a correlative imaging approach.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Progressive transformation of the otic placode into the functional inner ear during gestational development in humans leads to the acquisition of hearing perception via the cochlea and balance and spatial orientation via the vestibular organ.

RESULTS

Using a correlative approach involving micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT), transmission electron microscopy and histological techniques we were able to examine both the morphological and cellular changes associated with human inner ear development. Such an evaluation allowed for the examination of 3D geometry with high spatial and temporal resolution. In concert with gestational progression and growth of the cochlear duct, an increase in the distance between some of the Crista ampullaris is evident in all the specimens examined from GW12 to GW36. A parallel increase in the distances between the macular organs - fetal utricle and saccule - is also evident across the gestational stages examined. The distances between both the utricle and saccule to the three cristae ampullares also increased across the stages examined. A gradient in hair cell differentiation is apparent from apex to base of the fetal cochlea even at GW14.

CONCLUSION

We present structural information on human inner ear development across multiple levels of biological organization, including gross-morphology of the inner ear, cellular and subcellular details of hearing and vestibular organs, as well as ultrastructural details in the developing sensory epithelia. This enabled the gathering of detailed information regarding morphometric changes as well in realizing the complex developmental patterns of the human inner ear. We were able to quantify the volumetric and linear aspects of selected gestational inner ear specimens enabling a better understanding of the cellular changes across the fetal gestational timeline. Moreover, these data could serve as a reference for better understanding disorders that arise during inner ear development.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

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    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria.

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    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria.

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    Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, Division of Anatomical Pathology, 5B4.09 Walter C MacKenzie Health Sciences Centre, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada.

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    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria.

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    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria.

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    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria.

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    Department of Anatomy, Histology & Embryology, Division of Clinical & Functional Anatomy, Medical University of Innsbruck, Muellerstrasse 59, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria.

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    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria. University Clinics Innsbruck, Tirol Kliniken, Anichstrasse 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria.

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    Department of Anatomy, Histology & Embryology, Division of Clinical & Functional Anatomy, Medical University of Innsbruck, Muellerstrasse 59, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria.

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    Department of Surgical Sciences, Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Otolaryngology, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85, Uppsala, SE, Sweden.

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    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria. Annelies.Schrott@i-med.ac.at.

    VetCore Facility for Research, Imaging Unit, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210, Vienna, Austria.

    Source

    BMC developmental biology 19:1 2019 May 20 pg 11

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    31109306

    Citation

    Johnson Chacko, Lejo, et al. "Growth and Cellular Patterning During Fetal Human Inner Ear Development Studied By a Correlative Imaging Approach." BMC Developmental Biology, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019, p. 11.
    Johnson Chacko L, Wertjanz D, Sergi C, et al. Growth and cellular patterning during fetal human inner ear development studied by a correlative imaging approach. BMC Dev Biol. 2019;19(1):11.
    Johnson Chacko, L., Wertjanz, D., Sergi, C., Dudas, J., Fischer, N., Eberharter, T., ... Handschuh, S. (2019). Growth and cellular patterning during fetal human inner ear development studied by a correlative imaging approach. BMC Developmental Biology, 19(1), p. 11. doi:10.1186/s12861-019-0191-y.
    Johnson Chacko L, et al. Growth and Cellular Patterning During Fetal Human Inner Ear Development Studied By a Correlative Imaging Approach. BMC Dev Biol. 2019 May 20;19(1):11. PubMed PMID: 31109306.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Growth and cellular patterning during fetal human inner ear development studied by a correlative imaging approach. AU - Johnson Chacko,Lejo, AU - Wertjanz,David, AU - Sergi,Consolato, AU - Dudas,Jozsef, AU - Fischer,Natalie, AU - Eberharter,Theresa, AU - Hoermann,Romed, AU - Glueckert,Rudolf, AU - Fritsch,Helga, AU - Rask-Andersen,Helge, AU - Schrott-Fischer,Anneliese, AU - Handschuh,Stephan, Y1 - 2019/05/20/ PY - 2018/11/09/received PY - 2019/04/12/accepted PY - 2019/5/22/entrez PY - 2019/5/22/pubmed PY - 2019/5/22/medline SP - 11 EP - 11 JF - BMC developmental biology JO - BMC Dev. Biol. VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Progressive transformation of the otic placode into the functional inner ear during gestational development in humans leads to the acquisition of hearing perception via the cochlea and balance and spatial orientation via the vestibular organ. RESULTS: Using a correlative approach involving micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT), transmission electron microscopy and histological techniques we were able to examine both the morphological and cellular changes associated with human inner ear development. Such an evaluation allowed for the examination of 3D geometry with high spatial and temporal resolution. In concert with gestational progression and growth of the cochlear duct, an increase in the distance between some of the Crista ampullaris is evident in all the specimens examined from GW12 to GW36. A parallel increase in the distances between the macular organs - fetal utricle and saccule - is also evident across the gestational stages examined. The distances between both the utricle and saccule to the three cristae ampullares also increased across the stages examined. A gradient in hair cell differentiation is apparent from apex to base of the fetal cochlea even at GW14. CONCLUSION: We present structural information on human inner ear development across multiple levels of biological organization, including gross-morphology of the inner ear, cellular and subcellular details of hearing and vestibular organs, as well as ultrastructural details in the developing sensory epithelia. This enabled the gathering of detailed information regarding morphometric changes as well in realizing the complex developmental patterns of the human inner ear. We were able to quantify the volumetric and linear aspects of selected gestational inner ear specimens enabling a better understanding of the cellular changes across the fetal gestational timeline. Moreover, these data could serve as a reference for better understanding disorders that arise during inner ear development. SN - 1471-213X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31109306/Growth_and_cellular_patterning_during_fetal_human_inner_ear_development_studied_by_a_correlative_imaging_approach L2 - https://bmcdevbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12861-019-0191-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -