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Snacking characteristics and patterns and their associations with diet quality and BMI in the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research Consortium.
Public Health Nutr. 2019 12; 22(17):3189-3199.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe snacking characteristics and patterns in children and examine associations with diet quality and BMI.

DESIGN

Children's weight and height were measured. Participants/adult proxies completed multiple 24 h dietary recalls. Snack occasions were self-identified. Snack patterns were derived for each sample using exploratory factor analysis. Associations of snacking characteristics and patterns with Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) score and BMI were examined using multivariable linear regression models.

SETTING

Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) Consortium, USA: NET-Works, GROW, GOALS and IMPACT studies.

PARTICIPANTS

Predominantly low-income, racial/ethnic minorities: NET-Works (n 534, 2-4-year-olds); GROW (n 610, 3-5-year-olds); GOALS (n 241, 7-11-year-olds); IMPACT (n 360, 10-13-year-olds).

RESULTS

Two snack patterns were derived for three studies: a meal-like pattern and a beverage pattern. The IMPACT study had a similar meal-like pattern and a dairy/grains pattern. A positive association was observed between meal-like pattern adherence and HEI-2010 score (P for trend < 0⋅01) and snack occasion frequency and HEI-2010 score (β coefficient (95 % CI): NET-Works, 0⋅14 (0⋅04, 0⋅23); GROW, 0⋅12 (0⋅02, 0⋅21)) among younger children. A preference for snacking while using a screen was inversely associated with HEI-2010 score in all studies except IMPACT (β coefficient (95 % CI): NET-Works, -3⋅15 (-5⋅37, -0⋅92); GROW, -2⋅44 (-4⋅27, -0⋅61); GOALS, -5⋅80 (-8⋅74, -2⋅86)). Associations with BMI were almost all null.

CONCLUSIONS

Meal-like and beverage patterns described most children's snack intake, although patterns for non-Hispanic Blacks or adolescents may differ. Diets of 2-5-year-olds may benefit from frequent meal-like pattern snack consumption and diets of all children may benefit from decreasing screen use during eating occasions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 135 Dauer Drive, CB #7461, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 135 Dauer Drive, CB #7461, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.Solutions Science Lab, Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.Schools of Nursing and Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.Solutions Science Lab, Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA.Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA.Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31112114

Citation

LeCroy, Madison N., et al. "Snacking Characteristics and Patterns and Their Associations With Diet Quality and BMI in the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research Consortium." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 22, no. 17, 2019, pp. 3189-3199.
LeCroy MN, Truesdale KP, Matheson DM, et al. Snacking characteristics and patterns and their associations with diet quality and BMI in the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research Consortium. Public Health Nutr. 2019;22(17):3189-3199.
LeCroy, M. N., Truesdale, K. P., Matheson, D. M., Karp, S. M., Moore, S. M., Robinson, T. N., Berge, J. M., Nicastro, H. L., & Thomas, A. J. (2019). Snacking characteristics and patterns and their associations with diet quality and BMI in the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research Consortium. Public Health Nutrition, 22(17), 3189-3199. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980019000958
LeCroy MN, et al. Snacking Characteristics and Patterns and Their Associations With Diet Quality and BMI in the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research Consortium. Public Health Nutr. 2019;22(17):3189-3199. PubMed PMID: 31112114.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Snacking characteristics and patterns and their associations with diet quality and BMI in the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research Consortium. AU - LeCroy,Madison N, AU - Truesdale,Kimberly P, AU - Matheson,Donna M, AU - Karp,Sharon M, AU - Moore,Shirley M, AU - Robinson,Thomas N, AU - Berge,Jerica M, AU - Nicastro,Holly L, AU - Thomas,Alicia J, Y1 - 2019/05/21/ PY - 2019/5/22/pubmed PY - 2020/9/9/medline PY - 2019/5/22/entrez KW - Child diet KW - Childhood obesity KW - Dietary pattern KW - Screen use KW - Snack KW - USA SP - 3189 EP - 3199 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 22 IS - 17 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe snacking characteristics and patterns in children and examine associations with diet quality and BMI. DESIGN: Children's weight and height were measured. Participants/adult proxies completed multiple 24 h dietary recalls. Snack occasions were self-identified. Snack patterns were derived for each sample using exploratory factor analysis. Associations of snacking characteristics and patterns with Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) score and BMI were examined using multivariable linear regression models. SETTING: Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) Consortium, USA: NET-Works, GROW, GOALS and IMPACT studies. PARTICIPANTS: Predominantly low-income, racial/ethnic minorities: NET-Works (n 534, 2-4-year-olds); GROW (n 610, 3-5-year-olds); GOALS (n 241, 7-11-year-olds); IMPACT (n 360, 10-13-year-olds). RESULTS: Two snack patterns were derived for three studies: a meal-like pattern and a beverage pattern. The IMPACT study had a similar meal-like pattern and a dairy/grains pattern. A positive association was observed between meal-like pattern adherence and HEI-2010 score (P for trend < 0⋅01) and snack occasion frequency and HEI-2010 score (β coefficient (95 % CI): NET-Works, 0⋅14 (0⋅04, 0⋅23); GROW, 0⋅12 (0⋅02, 0⋅21)) among younger children. A preference for snacking while using a screen was inversely associated with HEI-2010 score in all studies except IMPACT (β coefficient (95 % CI): NET-Works, -3⋅15 (-5⋅37, -0⋅92); GROW, -2⋅44 (-4⋅27, -0⋅61); GOALS, -5⋅80 (-8⋅74, -2⋅86)). Associations with BMI were almost all null. CONCLUSIONS: Meal-like and beverage patterns described most children's snack intake, although patterns for non-Hispanic Blacks or adolescents may differ. Diets of 2-5-year-olds may benefit from frequent meal-like pattern snack consumption and diets of all children may benefit from decreasing screen use during eating occasions. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31112114/Snacking_characteristics_and_patterns_and_their_associations_with_diet_quality_and_BMI_in_the_Childhood_Obesity_Prevention_and_Treatment_Research_Consortium_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980019000958/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -