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Prevalence of genital and oropharyngeal chlamydia and gonorrhoea among female sex workers in Melbourne, Australia, 2015-2017: need for oropharyngeal testing.
Sex Transm Infect. 2019 09; 95(6):398-401.ST

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The Victorian legislation requires sex workers to have quarterly screening for genital chlamydia and gonorrhoea, but screening for oropharyngeal infection is not mandatory in Victoria, Australia. In 2017, oropharyngeal screening for gonorrhoea and chlamydia was added as part of the routine quarterly screening for sex workers attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC). The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea and chlamydia among female sex workers (FSW).

METHODS

We included females who (1) self-identified as sex workers or were attended MSHC for a sex work certificate and (2) had tested for any STI or HIV, between March 2015 and December 2017. The prevalence of HIV, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhoea was calculated.

RESULTS

There were 8538 FSW consultations among 2780 individuals during the study period. There was a twofold increase in genital gonorrhoea (from 0.5% (95% CI 0.3% to 0.9%) to 1.1% (95% CI 0.8% to 1.5%); ptrend=0.047) and a 1.5-fold increase in genital chlamydia (from 2.2% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.8%) to 3.2% (95% CI 2.6% to 3.8%); ptrend=0.031) during the period. Overall, the prevalence of HIV (0.2% (95% CI 0.1% to 0.3%)) and syphilis (0.1% (95% CI 0.0% to 0.2%)) remained low and did not change over time. In 2017, the prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea was 2.0% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.6%) and oropharyngeal chlamydia was 2.1% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.7%). Among FSW who were tested positive for gonorrhoea and chlamydia, 55% (n=41) and 34% (n=45) only tested positive in the oropharynx but not genital for gonorrhoea and chlamydia, respectively.

CONCLUSION

The prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea and chlamydia is similar to the prevalence at genital sites and is often independent of genital infection. It is important to test the oropharynx and genital site for chlamydia and gonorrhoea among FSW.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia eric.chow@monash.edu. Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne at The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne at The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne at The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31113904

Citation

Chow, Eric Pf, et al. "Prevalence of Genital and Oropharyngeal Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Among Female Sex Workers in Melbourne, Australia, 2015-2017: Need for Oropharyngeal Testing." Sexually Transmitted Infections, vol. 95, no. 6, 2019, pp. 398-401.
Chow EP, Williamson DA, Fortune R, et al. Prevalence of genital and oropharyngeal chlamydia and gonorrhoea among female sex workers in Melbourne, Australia, 2015-2017: need for oropharyngeal testing. Sex Transm Infect. 2019;95(6):398-401.
Chow, E. P., Williamson, D. A., Fortune, R., Bradshaw, C. S., Chen, M. Y., Fehler, G., De Petra, V., Howden, B. P., & Fairley, C. K. (2019). Prevalence of genital and oropharyngeal chlamydia and gonorrhoea among female sex workers in Melbourne, Australia, 2015-2017: need for oropharyngeal testing. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 95(6), 398-401. https://doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2018-053957
Chow EP, et al. Prevalence of Genital and Oropharyngeal Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Among Female Sex Workers in Melbourne, Australia, 2015-2017: Need for Oropharyngeal Testing. Sex Transm Infect. 2019;95(6):398-401. PubMed PMID: 31113904.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of genital and oropharyngeal chlamydia and gonorrhoea among female sex workers in Melbourne, Australia, 2015-2017: need for oropharyngeal testing. AU - Chow,Eric Pf, AU - Williamson,Deborah A, AU - Fortune,Ria, AU - Bradshaw,Catriona S, AU - Chen,Marcus Y, AU - Fehler,Glenda, AU - De Petra,Vesna, AU - Howden,Benjamin P, AU - Fairley,Christopher K, Y1 - 2019/05/21/ PY - 2018/12/23/received PY - 2019/03/04/revised PY - 2019/03/24/accepted PY - 2019/5/23/pubmed PY - 2020/2/6/medline PY - 2019/5/23/entrez KW - Chlamydia trachomatis KW - Neisseria gonorrhoeae KW - commercial sex KW - epidemiology (clinical) KW - screening KW - sex work SP - 398 EP - 401 JF - Sexually transmitted infections JO - Sex Transm Infect VL - 95 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The Victorian legislation requires sex workers to have quarterly screening for genital chlamydia and gonorrhoea, but screening for oropharyngeal infection is not mandatory in Victoria, Australia. In 2017, oropharyngeal screening for gonorrhoea and chlamydia was added as part of the routine quarterly screening for sex workers attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC). The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea and chlamydia among female sex workers (FSW). METHODS: We included females who (1) self-identified as sex workers or were attended MSHC for a sex work certificate and (2) had tested for any STI or HIV, between March 2015 and December 2017. The prevalence of HIV, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhoea was calculated. RESULTS: There were 8538 FSW consultations among 2780 individuals during the study period. There was a twofold increase in genital gonorrhoea (from 0.5% (95% CI 0.3% to 0.9%) to 1.1% (95% CI 0.8% to 1.5%); ptrend=0.047) and a 1.5-fold increase in genital chlamydia (from 2.2% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.8%) to 3.2% (95% CI 2.6% to 3.8%); ptrend=0.031) during the period. Overall, the prevalence of HIV (0.2% (95% CI 0.1% to 0.3%)) and syphilis (0.1% (95% CI 0.0% to 0.2%)) remained low and did not change over time. In 2017, the prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea was 2.0% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.6%) and oropharyngeal chlamydia was 2.1% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.7%). Among FSW who were tested positive for gonorrhoea and chlamydia, 55% (n=41) and 34% (n=45) only tested positive in the oropharynx but not genital for gonorrhoea and chlamydia, respectively. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea and chlamydia is similar to the prevalence at genital sites and is often independent of genital infection. It is important to test the oropharynx and genital site for chlamydia and gonorrhoea among FSW. SN - 1472-3263 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31113904/Prevalence_of_genital_and_oropharyngeal_chlamydia_and_gonorrhoea_among_female_sex_workers_in_Melbourne_Australia_2015_2017:_need_for_oropharyngeal_testing_ L2 - http://sti.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=31113904 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -