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A prospective study of dairy product intake and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in U.S. men and women.
Int J Cancer 2020; 146(5):1241-1249IJ

Abstract

Although increasing dairy product intake has been associated with risk of several cancers, epidemiological studies on hepatocellular carcinoma are sparse and have yielded inconsistent results. We prospectively assessed the associations of dairy products (total, milk, butter, cheese and yogurt) and their major components (calcium, vitamin D, fats and protein) with the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development among 51,418 men and 93,427 women in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Nurses' Health Study. Diets were collected at baseline and updated every 4 years using validated food frequency questionnaires. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression model. During up to 32 years of follow-up, a total of 164 hepatocellular carcinoma cases were documented. After adjustment for most known hepatocellular carcinoma risk factors, higher total dairy product intake was associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (highest vs. lowest tertile, HR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.19-2.88; ptrend = 0.009). For the same comparison, we observed significant positive associations of high-fat dairy (HR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.19-2.76; ptrend = 0.008) and butter (HR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.06-2.36; ptrend = 0.04) with hepatocellular carcinoma risk. There was a nonsignificant inverse association between yogurt intake and hepatocellular carcinoma risk (HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.49-1.05; ptrend = 0.26). Our data suggest that higher intake of high-fat dairy foods was associated with higher, whereas higher yogurt consumption might be associated with lower risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma among U.S. men and women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Key Laboratory of Environmental Medicine Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of public Health, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, People's Republic of China.Liver Center, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit (CTEU), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore.Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit (CTEU), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31116416

Citation

Yang, Wanshui, et al. "A Prospective Study of Dairy Product Intake and the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in U.S. Men and Women." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 146, no. 5, 2020, pp. 1241-1249.
Yang W, Sui J, Ma Y, et al. A prospective study of dairy product intake and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in U.S. men and women. Int J Cancer. 2020;146(5):1241-1249.
Yang, W., Sui, J., Ma, Y., Simon, T. G., Chong, D., Meyerhardt, J. A., ... Zhang, X. (2020). A prospective study of dairy product intake and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in U.S. men and women. International Journal of Cancer, 146(5), pp. 1241-1249. doi:10.1002/ijc.32423.
Yang W, et al. A Prospective Study of Dairy Product Intake and the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in U.S. Men and Women. Int J Cancer. 2020 Mar 1;146(5):1241-1249. PubMed PMID: 31116416.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of dairy product intake and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in U.S. men and women. AU - Yang,Wanshui, AU - Sui,Jing, AU - Ma,Yanan, AU - Simon,Tracey G, AU - Chong,Dawn, AU - Meyerhardt,Jeffrey A, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Chan,Andrew T, AU - Zhang,Xuehong, Y1 - 2019/06/06/ PY - 2019/01/25/received PY - 2019/04/20/revised PY - 2019/05/09/accepted PY - 2021/03/01/pmc-release PY - 2019/5/23/pubmed PY - 2019/5/23/medline PY - 2019/5/23/entrez KW - cancer KW - cancer prevention KW - cohort study KW - dairy products KW - hepatocellular carcinoma KW - milk SP - 1241 EP - 1249 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 146 IS - 5 N2 - Although increasing dairy product intake has been associated with risk of several cancers, epidemiological studies on hepatocellular carcinoma are sparse and have yielded inconsistent results. We prospectively assessed the associations of dairy products (total, milk, butter, cheese and yogurt) and their major components (calcium, vitamin D, fats and protein) with the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development among 51,418 men and 93,427 women in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Nurses' Health Study. Diets were collected at baseline and updated every 4 years using validated food frequency questionnaires. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression model. During up to 32 years of follow-up, a total of 164 hepatocellular carcinoma cases were documented. After adjustment for most known hepatocellular carcinoma risk factors, higher total dairy product intake was associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (highest vs. lowest tertile, HR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.19-2.88; ptrend = 0.009). For the same comparison, we observed significant positive associations of high-fat dairy (HR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.19-2.76; ptrend = 0.008) and butter (HR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.06-2.36; ptrend = 0.04) with hepatocellular carcinoma risk. There was a nonsignificant inverse association between yogurt intake and hepatocellular carcinoma risk (HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.49-1.05; ptrend = 0.26). Our data suggest that higher intake of high-fat dairy foods was associated with higher, whereas higher yogurt consumption might be associated with lower risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma among U.S. men and women. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31116416/A_prospective_study_of_dairy_product_intake_and_the_risk_of_hepatocellular_carcinoma_in_U_S__men_and_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32423 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -