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Herbivore-induced volatile emission from old-growth black poplar trees under field conditions.
Sci Rep 2019; 9(1):7714SR

Abstract

Herbivory is well known to trigger increased emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from plants, but we know little about the responses of mature trees. We measured the volatiles emitted by leaves of old-growth black poplar (Populus nigra) trees after experimental damage by gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars in a floodplain forest, and studied the effect of herbivory on the transcript abundance of two genes involved in the biosynthesis of VOCs, and the accumulation of defence phytohormones. Herbivory significantly increased volatile emission from the experimentally damaged foliage, but not from adjacent undamaged leaves in the damaged branches (i.e., no systemic response). Methylbutyraldoximes, 4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT), (Z)-3-hexenol and (E)-β-ocimene, amongst other compounds, were found to be important in distinguishing the blend of herbivore-damaged vs. undamaged leaves. Herbivory also increased expression of PnTPS3 (described here for the first time) and PnCYP79D6-v4 genes at the damaged sites, these genes encode for an (E)-β-ocimene synthase and a P450 enzyme involved in aldoxime formation, respectively, demonstrating de novo biosynthesis of the volatiles produced. Herbivore-damaged leaves had significantly higher levels of jasmonic acid and its conjugate (-)-jasmonic acid-isoleucine. This study shows that mature trees in the field have a robust response to herbivory, producing induced volatiles at the damaged sites even after previous natural herbivory and under changing environmental conditions, however, further studies are needed to establish whether the observed absence of systemic responses is typical of mature poplar trees or if specific conditions are required for their induction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Department of Biochemistry, Hans-Knöll-Straβe 8, 07745, Jena, Germany. Massey University, College of Sciences, Tennent Drive, 4410, Palmerston North, New Zealand.Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Department of Biochemistry, Hans-Knöll-Straβe 8, 07745, Jena, Germany. Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, 2185 East Mall, Vancouver, V6T 1Z4, BC, Canada.Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Department of Biochemistry, Hans-Knöll-Straβe 8, 07745, Jena, Germany.Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Department of Biochemistry, Hans-Knöll-Straβe 8, 07745, Jena, Germany.Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Department of Biochemistry, Hans-Knöll-Straβe 8, 07745, Jena, Germany.Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Department of Biochemistry, Hans-Knöll-Straβe 8, 07745, Jena, Germany. sunsicker@ice.mpg.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31118456

Citation

McCormick, Andrea Clavijo, et al. "Herbivore-induced Volatile Emission From Old-growth Black Poplar Trees Under Field Conditions." Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, 2019, p. 7714.
McCormick AC, Irmisch S, Boeckler GA, et al. Herbivore-induced volatile emission from old-growth black poplar trees under field conditions. Sci Rep. 2019;9(1):7714.
McCormick, A. C., Irmisch, S., Boeckler, G. A., Gershenzon, J., Köllner, T. G., & Unsicker, S. B. (2019). Herbivore-induced volatile emission from old-growth black poplar trees under field conditions. Scientific Reports, 9(1), p. 7714. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43931-y.
McCormick AC, et al. Herbivore-induced Volatile Emission From Old-growth Black Poplar Trees Under Field Conditions. Sci Rep. 2019 May 22;9(1):7714. PubMed PMID: 31118456.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Herbivore-induced volatile emission from old-growth black poplar trees under field conditions. AU - McCormick,Andrea Clavijo, AU - Irmisch,Sandra, AU - Boeckler,G Andreas, AU - Gershenzon,Jonathan, AU - Köllner,Tobias G, AU - Unsicker,Sybille B, Y1 - 2019/05/22/ PY - 2018/11/08/received PY - 2019/04/25/accepted PY - 2019/5/24/entrez PY - 2019/5/24/pubmed PY - 2019/5/24/medline SP - 7714 EP - 7714 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - Herbivory is well known to trigger increased emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from plants, but we know little about the responses of mature trees. We measured the volatiles emitted by leaves of old-growth black poplar (Populus nigra) trees after experimental damage by gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars in a floodplain forest, and studied the effect of herbivory on the transcript abundance of two genes involved in the biosynthesis of VOCs, and the accumulation of defence phytohormones. Herbivory significantly increased volatile emission from the experimentally damaged foliage, but not from adjacent undamaged leaves in the damaged branches (i.e., no systemic response). Methylbutyraldoximes, 4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT), (Z)-3-hexenol and (E)-β-ocimene, amongst other compounds, were found to be important in distinguishing the blend of herbivore-damaged vs. undamaged leaves. Herbivory also increased expression of PnTPS3 (described here for the first time) and PnCYP79D6-v4 genes at the damaged sites, these genes encode for an (E)-β-ocimene synthase and a P450 enzyme involved in aldoxime formation, respectively, demonstrating de novo biosynthesis of the volatiles produced. Herbivore-damaged leaves had significantly higher levels of jasmonic acid and its conjugate (-)-jasmonic acid-isoleucine. This study shows that mature trees in the field have a robust response to herbivory, producing induced volatiles at the damaged sites even after previous natural herbivory and under changing environmental conditions, however, further studies are needed to establish whether the observed absence of systemic responses is typical of mature poplar trees or if specific conditions are required for their induction. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31118456/Herbivore_induced_volatile_emission_from_old_growth_black_poplar_trees_under_field_conditions_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-43931-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -