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The use of cannabinoids for sleep: A critical review on clinical trials.
Exp Clin Psychopharmacol 2019; 27(4):383-401EC

Abstract

Cannabis and its pharmacologically active constituents, phytocannabinoids, have long been reported to have multiple medicinal benefits. One association often reported by users is sedation and subjective improvements in sleep. To further examine this association, we conducted a critical review of clinical studies examining the effects of cannabinoids on subjective and objective measures of sleep. PubMED, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched using terms and synonyms related to cannabinoids and sleep. Articles chosen included randomized controlled trials and open label studies. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the quality of trials that compared cannabinoids with control interventions. The current literature focuses mostly on the use of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and/or cannabidiol (CBD) in the treatment of chronic health conditions such as multiple sclerosis, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic pain. Sleep is often a secondary, rather than primary outcome in these studies. Many of the reviewed studies suggested that cannabinoids could improve sleep quality, decrease sleep disturbances, and decrease sleep onset latency. While many of the studies did show a positive effect on sleep, there are many limiting factors such as small sample sizes, examining sleep as a secondary outcome in the context of another illness, and relatively few studies using validated subjective or objective measurements. This review also identified several questions that should be addressed in future research. These questions include further elucidation of the dichotomy between the effects of THC and CBD, as well as identifying any long-term adverse effects of medicinal cannabinoid use. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroscience Graduate Program, McMaster University.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University.Neuroscience Graduate Program, McMaster University.Department of Medicine, McMaster University.Neuroscience Graduate Program, McMaster University.Neuroscience Graduate Program, McMaster University.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31120284

Citation

Kuhathasan, Nirushi, et al. "The Use of Cannabinoids for Sleep: a Critical Review On Clinical Trials." Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 27, no. 4, 2019, pp. 383-401.
Kuhathasan N, Dufort A, MacKillop J, et al. The use of cannabinoids for sleep: A critical review on clinical trials. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2019;27(4):383-401.
Kuhathasan, N., Dufort, A., MacKillop, J., Gottschalk, R., Minuzzi, L., & Frey, B. N. (2019). The use of cannabinoids for sleep: A critical review on clinical trials. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, 27(4), pp. 383-401. doi:10.1037/pha0000285.
Kuhathasan N, et al. The Use of Cannabinoids for Sleep: a Critical Review On Clinical Trials. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2019;27(4):383-401. PubMed PMID: 31120284.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The use of cannabinoids for sleep: A critical review on clinical trials. AU - Kuhathasan,Nirushi, AU - Dufort,Alexander, AU - MacKillop,James, AU - Gottschalk,Raymond, AU - Minuzzi,Luciano, AU - Frey,Benicio N, Y1 - 2019/05/23/ PY - 2019/5/24/pubmed PY - 2019/5/24/medline PY - 2019/5/24/entrez SP - 383 EP - 401 JF - Experimental and clinical psychopharmacology JO - Exp Clin Psychopharmacol VL - 27 IS - 4 N2 - Cannabis and its pharmacologically active constituents, phytocannabinoids, have long been reported to have multiple medicinal benefits. One association often reported by users is sedation and subjective improvements in sleep. To further examine this association, we conducted a critical review of clinical studies examining the effects of cannabinoids on subjective and objective measures of sleep. PubMED, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched using terms and synonyms related to cannabinoids and sleep. Articles chosen included randomized controlled trials and open label studies. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the quality of trials that compared cannabinoids with control interventions. The current literature focuses mostly on the use of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and/or cannabidiol (CBD) in the treatment of chronic health conditions such as multiple sclerosis, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic pain. Sleep is often a secondary, rather than primary outcome in these studies. Many of the reviewed studies suggested that cannabinoids could improve sleep quality, decrease sleep disturbances, and decrease sleep onset latency. While many of the studies did show a positive effect on sleep, there are many limiting factors such as small sample sizes, examining sleep as a secondary outcome in the context of another illness, and relatively few studies using validated subjective or objective measurements. This review also identified several questions that should be addressed in future research. These questions include further elucidation of the dichotomy between the effects of THC and CBD, as well as identifying any long-term adverse effects of medicinal cannabinoid use. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved). SN - 1936-2293 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31120284/The_use_of_cannabinoids_for_sleep:_A_critical_review_on_clinical_trials L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/pha/27/4/383 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -