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Motor performance improvement through virtual reality task is related to fatigue and cognition in people with multiple sclerosis.
Physiother Res Int 2019; :e1782PR

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) who undergo rehabilitation need to perform new motor skills or relearn old motor skills. It is not clear whether people with MS retain the ability to improve motor performance or learning. Furthermore, factors that influence motor performance in people with MS need to be investigated. This study explored motor performance in people with MS using virtual reality (VR). The effect of fatigue and cognitive function on motor performance improvement in people with MS was investigated.

METHODS

Twenty MS participants and 20 controls were recruited into the study. To assess motor performance, each participant was asked to perform a VR game for five times (blocks). The main outcome was time to complete the VR game and number of recorded errors. To assess fatigue level and cognitive function, participants were asked to complete the Arabic versions of the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) and the Montréal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA), respectively.

RESULTS

MS participants and controls demonstrated a practice-related improvement in performance as shown by the main effect of block for each of the outcome measures (p < .001, time required to complete VR game; p < .001, errors recorded). Strong and significant negative correlations between recorded errors and MOCA (r = .75, p < .001) and between recorded errors and MFIS (r = .55, p = .011) were found in people with MS.

CONCLUSIONS

Ability to improve motor performance in people with MS is preserved and related to cognitive function and fatigue impact. Health-care professionals should be made aware of the negative impact of cognitive function and fatigue on motor performance. A multicomponent intervention that targets these factors is advisable. Future research, however, is required to determine the content and potential benefits of such an intervention in the MS population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan.Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan.Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan.School of Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan.Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan.Neuroscience Department, Faculty of Graduate Studies, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31120581

Citation

Al-Sharman, Alham, et al. "Motor Performance Improvement Through Virtual Reality Task Is Related to Fatigue and Cognition in People With Multiple Sclerosis." Physiotherapy Research International : the Journal for Researchers and Clinicians in Physical Therapy, 2019, pp. e1782.
Al-Sharman A, Khalil H, El-Salem K, et al. Motor performance improvement through virtual reality task is related to fatigue and cognition in people with multiple sclerosis. Physiother Res Int. 2019.
Al-Sharman, A., Khalil, H., El-Salem, K., Alghwiri, A. A., Khazaaleh, S., & Khraim, M. (2019). Motor performance improvement through virtual reality task is related to fatigue and cognition in people with multiple sclerosis. Physiotherapy Research International : the Journal for Researchers and Clinicians in Physical Therapy, pp. e1782. doi:10.1002/pri.1782.
Al-Sharman A, et al. Motor Performance Improvement Through Virtual Reality Task Is Related to Fatigue and Cognition in People With Multiple Sclerosis. Physiother Res Int. 2019 May 23;e1782. PubMed PMID: 31120581.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Motor performance improvement through virtual reality task is related to fatigue and cognition in people with multiple sclerosis. AU - Al-Sharman,Alham, AU - Khalil,Hanan, AU - El-Salem,Khalid, AU - Alghwiri,Alia A, AU - Khazaaleh,Shada, AU - Khraim,Mohammad, Y1 - 2019/05/23/ PY - 2018/04/26/received PY - 2019/02/10/revised PY - 2019/03/28/accepted PY - 2019/5/24/entrez KW - motor performance KW - multiple sclerosis KW - rehabilitation KW - virtual reality SP - e1782 EP - e1782 JF - Physiotherapy research international : the journal for researchers and clinicians in physical therapy JO - Physiother Res Int N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: People with multiple sclerosis (MS) who undergo rehabilitation need to perform new motor skills or relearn old motor skills. It is not clear whether people with MS retain the ability to improve motor performance or learning. Furthermore, factors that influence motor performance in people with MS need to be investigated. This study explored motor performance in people with MS using virtual reality (VR). The effect of fatigue and cognitive function on motor performance improvement in people with MS was investigated. METHODS: Twenty MS participants and 20 controls were recruited into the study. To assess motor performance, each participant was asked to perform a VR game for five times (blocks). The main outcome was time to complete the VR game and number of recorded errors. To assess fatigue level and cognitive function, participants were asked to complete the Arabic versions of the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) and the Montréal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA), respectively. RESULTS: MS participants and controls demonstrated a practice-related improvement in performance as shown by the main effect of block for each of the outcome measures (p < .001, time required to complete VR game; p < .001, errors recorded). Strong and significant negative correlations between recorded errors and MOCA (r = .75, p < .001) and between recorded errors and MFIS (r = .55, p = .011) were found in people with MS. CONCLUSIONS: Ability to improve motor performance in people with MS is preserved and related to cognitive function and fatigue impact. Health-care professionals should be made aware of the negative impact of cognitive function and fatigue on motor performance. A multicomponent intervention that targets these factors is advisable. Future research, however, is required to determine the content and potential benefits of such an intervention in the MS population. SN - 1471-2865 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31120581/Motor_performance_improvement_through_virtual_reality_task_is_related_to_fatigue_and_cognition_in_people_with_multiple_sclerosis L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/pri.1782 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -