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Mood induction alters attention toward negative-positive stimulus pairs in sheep.

Abstract

Mood is a lasting affective state that influences motivation and decision-making by pre-shaping a subject's expectations (pessimism/optimism). Mood states affect biases in judgment, memory, and attention. Due to a lack of verbal report, assessing mood in non-human animals is challenging and is often compromised by intense training sessions. Measuring mood using attentional biases can circumvent this problem, as it takes advantage of observing a spontaneous reaction. As in humans, we expected that negative mood will heighten attention toward negative compared to positive stimuli. Here, we validate measures of attention toward acoustic stimuli in sheep (N = 64) and assess sheep's differential attention toward acoustic stimuli before and after mood induction (N = 32). Mood was induced by manipulating the environment. We used animal vocalizations (dog barking and sheep bleating as negative and positive stimuli, respectively) varying in intensity and played simultaneously from one side each, and measured lateral attention based on the sheep's behavior. Overall results were somewhat ambiguous. Yet, negative mood sheep seemed to shift their attention more toward dog vocalizations when the stimulus pair was well balanced at baseline. Though some adaptations are still needed, our approach could be a promising alternative to measure animals' mood without prior training.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Centre for Proper Housing of Ruminants and Pigs, Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office FSVO, Agroscope, Tänikon 1, CH-8356, Ettenhausen, Switzerland. Animal Welfare Division, Veterinary Public Health Institute, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Länggassstrasse 120, CH-3012, Bern, Switzerland.

    Animal Husbandry & Ethology, Albrecht Daniel Thaer-Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10115, Berlin, Germany. lorenz.gygax@hu-berlin.de.

    Source

    Scientific reports 9:1 2019 May 23 pg 7759

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    31123314

    Citation

    Raoult, Camille M C., and Lorenz Gygax. "Mood Induction Alters Attention Toward Negative-positive Stimulus Pairs in Sheep." Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, 2019, p. 7759.
    Raoult CMC, Gygax L. Mood induction alters attention toward negative-positive stimulus pairs in sheep. Sci Rep. 2019;9(1):7759.
    Raoult, C. M. C., & Gygax, L. (2019). Mood induction alters attention toward negative-positive stimulus pairs in sheep. Scientific Reports, 9(1), p. 7759. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44330-z.
    Raoult CMC, Gygax L. Mood Induction Alters Attention Toward Negative-positive Stimulus Pairs in Sheep. Sci Rep. 2019 May 23;9(1):7759. PubMed PMID: 31123314.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Mood induction alters attention toward negative-positive stimulus pairs in sheep. AU - Raoult,Camille M C, AU - Gygax,Lorenz, Y1 - 2019/05/23/ PY - 2019/01/15/received PY - 2019/05/14/accepted PY - 2019/5/25/entrez PY - 2019/5/28/pubmed PY - 2019/5/28/medline SP - 7759 EP - 7759 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - Mood is a lasting affective state that influences motivation and decision-making by pre-shaping a subject's expectations (pessimism/optimism). Mood states affect biases in judgment, memory, and attention. Due to a lack of verbal report, assessing mood in non-human animals is challenging and is often compromised by intense training sessions. Measuring mood using attentional biases can circumvent this problem, as it takes advantage of observing a spontaneous reaction. As in humans, we expected that negative mood will heighten attention toward negative compared to positive stimuli. Here, we validate measures of attention toward acoustic stimuli in sheep (N = 64) and assess sheep's differential attention toward acoustic stimuli before and after mood induction (N = 32). Mood was induced by manipulating the environment. We used animal vocalizations (dog barking and sheep bleating as negative and positive stimuli, respectively) varying in intensity and played simultaneously from one side each, and measured lateral attention based on the sheep's behavior. Overall results were somewhat ambiguous. Yet, negative mood sheep seemed to shift their attention more toward dog vocalizations when the stimulus pair was well balanced at baseline. Though some adaptations are still needed, our approach could be a promising alternative to measure animals' mood without prior training. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31123314/Mood_induction_alters_attention_toward_negative-positive_stimulus_pairs_in_sheep L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-44330-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -