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Last and least: Findings on intrahousehold undernutrition from participatory research in South Asia.
Soc Sci Med 2019; 232:316-323SS

Abstract

We analyze intrahousehold mechanisms that rural South Asian women themselves identify as contributing to their inabilities to achieve adequate nutrition. The majority of our female respondents explain that, within their families, they are most likely to eat least and last and to seek lower quality healthcare later, both of which can lead to undernutrition. We analyze the explanations that women provide for why they do so. In addition to norm abidance, we highlight two social factors: a partner's heavy alcohol use and intimate partner violence. Women report that these factors adversely impact their own health and food security status and potentially contribute to differential nutritional outcomes within the same household. The emic perspectives presented here show us: (1) many rural South Asian women report shouldering a relatively greater share of food and nutrition insecurity within their households, and (2) taking their perspectives seriously assists in identifying the underlying contributors to intrahousehold differences. These findings indicate the value a gendered perspective on both the drivers of and measurement of undernutrition. Attending to these intrahousehold factors in future research may yield important insights for understanding drivers of nutritional outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas, Austin, USA. Electronic address: erinclentz@utexas.edu.Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research (IGIDR), Mumbai, India.Collaborative Research and Dissemination (CORD), New Delhi, India.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31125800

Citation

Lentz, Erin C., et al. "Last and Least: Findings On Intrahousehold Undernutrition From Participatory Research in South Asia." Social Science & Medicine (1982), vol. 232, 2019, pp. 316-323.
Lentz EC, Narayanan S, De A. Last and least: Findings on intrahousehold undernutrition from participatory research in South Asia. Soc Sci Med. 2019;232:316-323.
Lentz, E. C., Narayanan, S., & De, A. (2019). Last and least: Findings on intrahousehold undernutrition from participatory research in South Asia. Social Science & Medicine (1982), 232, pp. 316-323. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.05.024.
Lentz EC, Narayanan S, De A. Last and Least: Findings On Intrahousehold Undernutrition From Participatory Research in South Asia. Soc Sci Med. 2019;232:316-323. PubMed PMID: 31125800.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Last and least: Findings on intrahousehold undernutrition from participatory research in South Asia. AU - Lentz,Erin C, AU - Narayanan,Sudha, AU - De,Anuradha, Y1 - 2019/05/17/ PY - 2018/06/14/received PY - 2019/05/11/revised PY - 2019/05/16/accepted PY - 2019/5/28/pubmed PY - 2019/5/28/medline PY - 2019/5/25/entrez KW - Alcohol KW - Gender KW - Intimate partner violence KW - Intrahousehold KW - Nutrition KW - South Asia SP - 316 EP - 323 JF - Social science & medicine (1982) JO - Soc Sci Med VL - 232 N2 - We analyze intrahousehold mechanisms that rural South Asian women themselves identify as contributing to their inabilities to achieve adequate nutrition. The majority of our female respondents explain that, within their families, they are most likely to eat least and last and to seek lower quality healthcare later, both of which can lead to undernutrition. We analyze the explanations that women provide for why they do so. In addition to norm abidance, we highlight two social factors: a partner's heavy alcohol use and intimate partner violence. Women report that these factors adversely impact their own health and food security status and potentially contribute to differential nutritional outcomes within the same household. The emic perspectives presented here show us: (1) many rural South Asian women report shouldering a relatively greater share of food and nutrition insecurity within their households, and (2) taking their perspectives seriously assists in identifying the underlying contributors to intrahousehold differences. These findings indicate the value a gendered perspective on both the drivers of and measurement of undernutrition. Attending to these intrahousehold factors in future research may yield important insights for understanding drivers of nutritional outcomes. SN - 1873-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31125800/Last_and_least:_Findings_on_intrahousehold_undernutrition_from_participatory_research_in_South_Asia L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0277-9536(19)30288-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -