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Snack Consumption Patterns among Canadians.
Nutrients. 2019 May 23; 11(5)N

Abstract

The snacking prevalence, frequency of daily snack consumption, and the contribution of snacks to daily energy intake have substantially increased globally. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of snack consumption among a representative sample of Canadians aged 2 and older. Nationally representative dietary data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) conducted in 2015 (n = 19,677 participants aged ≥2 years) were used to describe snacking patterns. In all, 80.4% of Canadians reported consuming at least one snack per day, which varied between different age groups from 77.0% (≥55 years) to 96.4% (2-5 years). About 37% of snack consumers reported only one snack episode per day but nearly 10% reported four or more episodes of snacking. Snacking contributed to nearly 23% of total daily energy intake in Canadians, which was highest among younger children (27%) and lowest among older adults (20.8%). There were no significant differences in obesity measures comparing snack consumers and non-consumers in children and adults. Snacking considerably contributes to total nutrient and energy intake of Canadians. Promoting nutrient-dense snacks provides an opportunity to improve overall diet quality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 4Z2, Canada. vatan.h@usask.ca.College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 4Z2, Canada. naorin.islam@usask.ca.College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 4Z2, Canada. rashmi.patil@usask.ca.College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 4Z2, Canada. mos866@usask.ca.Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition, General Mills, Minneapolis, MN 55427-3870, USA. Jessica.Smith@genmills.com.College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 4Z2, Canada. susan.whiting@usask.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31126080

Citation

Vatanparast, Hassan, et al. "Snack Consumption Patterns Among Canadians." Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 5, 2019.
Vatanparast H, Islam N, Patil RP, et al. Snack Consumption Patterns among Canadians. Nutrients. 2019;11(5).
Vatanparast, H., Islam, N., Patil, R. P., Shafiee, M., Smith, J., & Whiting, S. (2019). Snack Consumption Patterns among Canadians. Nutrients, 11(5). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051152
Vatanparast H, et al. Snack Consumption Patterns Among Canadians. Nutrients. 2019 May 23;11(5) PubMed PMID: 31126080.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Snack Consumption Patterns among Canadians. AU - Vatanparast,Hassan, AU - Islam,Naorin, AU - Patil,Rashmi Prakash, AU - Shafiee,Mojtaba, AU - Smith,Jessica, AU - Whiting,Susan, Y1 - 2019/05/23/ PY - 2019/04/09/received PY - 2019/05/17/revised PY - 2019/05/21/accepted PY - 2019/5/26/entrez PY - 2019/5/28/pubmed PY - 2019/12/28/medline KW - Canadian population KW - body mass index KW - food choices KW - food occasions KW - national survey KW - nutrient intake KW - snack KW - snacking patterns JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 11 IS - 5 N2 - The snacking prevalence, frequency of daily snack consumption, and the contribution of snacks to daily energy intake have substantially increased globally. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of snack consumption among a representative sample of Canadians aged 2 and older. Nationally representative dietary data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) conducted in 2015 (n = 19,677 participants aged ≥2 years) were used to describe snacking patterns. In all, 80.4% of Canadians reported consuming at least one snack per day, which varied between different age groups from 77.0% (≥55 years) to 96.4% (2-5 years). About 37% of snack consumers reported only one snack episode per day but nearly 10% reported four or more episodes of snacking. Snacking contributed to nearly 23% of total daily energy intake in Canadians, which was highest among younger children (27%) and lowest among older adults (20.8%). There were no significant differences in obesity measures comparing snack consumers and non-consumers in children and adults. Snacking considerably contributes to total nutrient and energy intake of Canadians. Promoting nutrient-dense snacks provides an opportunity to improve overall diet quality. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31126080/Snack_Consumption_Patterns_among_Canadians_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu11051152 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -