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Exploiting the Legacy of the Arbovirus Hunters.
Viruses 2019; 11(5)V

Abstract

In recent years, it has become evident that a generational gap has developed in the community of arbovirus research. This apparent gap is due to the dis-investment of training for the next generation of arbovirologists, which threatens to derail the rich history of virus discovery, field epidemiology, and understanding of the richness of diversity that surrounds us. On the other hand, new technologies have resulted in an explosion of virus discovery that is constantly redefining the virosphere and the evolutionary relationships between viruses. This paradox presents new challenges that may have immediate and disastrous consequences for public health when yet to be discovered arboviruses emerge. In this review we endeavor to bridge this gap by providing a historical context for the work being conducted today and provide continuity between the generations. To this end, we will provide a narrative of the thrill of scientific discovery and excitement and the challenges lying ahead.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. nivasila@utmb.edu. Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. nivasila@utmb.edu. Institute for Human Infection and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. nivasila@utmb.edu. Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. nivasila@utmb.edu.Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. rtesh@utmb.edu. Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. rtesh@utmb.edu. Institute for Human Infection and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. rtesh@utmb.edu. Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. rtesh@utmb.edu.Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. vpopov@utmb.edu. Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. vpopov@utmb.edu. Institute for Human Infection and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. vpopov@utmb.edu. Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. vpopov@utmb.edu.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston TX 77555, USA. sgwiden@utmb.edu.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston TX 77555, USA. tgwood@utmb.edu.Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. naforres@utmb.edu. Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. naforres@utmb.edu. Institute for Human Infection and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. naforres@utmb.edu. Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA. naforres@utmb.edu.Center of Excellence for Emerging & Zoonotic Animal Disease, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66502, USA. jpgonzalez@vet.k-state.edu.Oncovita, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Dr Roux, 75015 Paris, France. jfsaluzzo@gmail.com.Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, N.F. Gamaleya National Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology, Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation, 123098, 18 Gamaleya str., Moscow, Russia. salkh@yandex.ru.Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia. lamsk@nipahvirus.org.Faculty of Medical Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6102, Australia. J.Mackenzie@curtin.edu.au.School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia. peter.walker@uq.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31126128

Citation

Vasilakis, Nikos, et al. "Exploiting the Legacy of the Arbovirus Hunters." Viruses, vol. 11, no. 5, 2019.
Vasilakis N, Tesh RB, Popov VL, et al. Exploiting the Legacy of the Arbovirus Hunters. Viruses. 2019;11(5).
Vasilakis, N., Tesh, R. B., Popov, V. L., Widen, S. G., Wood, T. G., Forrester, N. L., ... Walker, P. J. (2019). Exploiting the Legacy of the Arbovirus Hunters. Viruses, 11(5), doi:10.3390/v11050471.
Vasilakis N, et al. Exploiting the Legacy of the Arbovirus Hunters. Viruses. 2019 May 23;11(5) PubMed PMID: 31126128.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exploiting the Legacy of the Arbovirus Hunters. AU - Vasilakis,Nikos, AU - Tesh,Robert B, AU - Popov,Vsevolod L, AU - Widen,Steve G, AU - Wood,Thomas G, AU - Forrester,Naomi L, AU - Gonzalez,Jean Paul, AU - Saluzzo,Jean Francois, AU - Alkhovsky,Sergey, AU - Lam,Sai Kit, AU - Mackenzie,John S, AU - Walker,Peter J, Y1 - 2019/05/23/ PY - 2019/03/26/received PY - 2019/05/15/revised PY - 2019/05/21/accepted PY - 2019/5/26/entrez PY - 2019/5/28/pubmed PY - 2019/5/28/medline KW - arbovirus discovery KW - arbovirus history KW - electron microscopy KW - metagenomics KW - next generation sequencing KW - taxonomy JF - Viruses JO - Viruses VL - 11 IS - 5 N2 - In recent years, it has become evident that a generational gap has developed in the community of arbovirus research. This apparent gap is due to the dis-investment of training for the next generation of arbovirologists, which threatens to derail the rich history of virus discovery, field epidemiology, and understanding of the richness of diversity that surrounds us. On the other hand, new technologies have resulted in an explosion of virus discovery that is constantly redefining the virosphere and the evolutionary relationships between viruses. This paradox presents new challenges that may have immediate and disastrous consequences for public health when yet to be discovered arboviruses emerge. In this review we endeavor to bridge this gap by providing a historical context for the work being conducted today and provide continuity between the generations. To this end, we will provide a narrative of the thrill of scientific discovery and excitement and the challenges lying ahead. SN - 1999-4915 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31126128/Exploiting_the_Legacy_of_the_Arbovirus_Hunters L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=v11050471 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -