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Enterovirus D68 respiratory infection in a children's hospital in Japan in 2015.
Pediatr Int. 2019 Aug; 61(8):768-776.PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Outbreaks of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) respiratory infections in children were reported globally in 2014. In Japan, there was an EV-D68 outbreak in the autumn of 2015 (September-October). The aim of this study was to compare EV-D68-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive and EV-D68-specific PCR-negative patients.

METHODS

Pediatric patients admitted for any respiratory symptoms between September and October 2015 were enrolled. Nasopharyngeal swabs were tested for multiplex respiratory virus PCR and EV-D68-specific reverse transcription-PCR. EV-D68-specific PCR-positive and -negative patients were compared regarding demographic data and clinical information.

RESULTS

A nasopharyngeal swab was obtained from 76 of 165 patients admitted with respiratory symptoms during the study period. EV-D68 was detected in 40 samples (52.6%). Median age in the EV-D68-specific PCR-positive and -negative groups was 3.0 years (IQR, 5.5 years) and 3.0 years (IQR, 4.0 years), respectively. The rates of coinfection in the two groups were 32.5% and 47.2%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the history of asthma or recurrent wheezing, length of hospitalization, or pediatric intensive care unit admission rate between the groups. The median days between symptom onset and admission was significantly lower for the EV-D68-positive group (3.0 days vs 5.0 days, P = 0.001). EV-D68 was identified as clade B on phylogenetic analysis. No cases of acute flaccid myelitis were encountered.

CONCLUSIONS

More than half of the samples from the children admitted with respiratory symptoms were positive for EV-D68-specific PCR during the outbreak. Asthma history was not associated with the risk of developing severe respiratory infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Pediatrics, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan.Infectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan.Clinical Research Support Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Musashi-Murayama, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Musashi-Murayama, Tokyo, Japan.Infectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.Infectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.Infectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Microbiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Public Health, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Microbiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Public Health, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Microbiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Public Health, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Medical Science, Department of Virology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Medical Science, Department of Virology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Medical Science, Department of Virology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31136073

Citation

Funakoshi, Yu, et al. "Enterovirus D68 Respiratory Infection in a Children's Hospital in Japan in 2015." Pediatrics International : Official Journal of the Japan Pediatric Society, vol. 61, no. 8, 2019, pp. 768-776.
Funakoshi Y, Ito K, Morino S, et al. Enterovirus D68 respiratory infection in a children's hospital in Japan in 2015. Pediatr Int. 2019;61(8):768-776.
Funakoshi, Y., Ito, K., Morino, S., Kinoshita, K., Morikawa, Y., Kono, T., Doan, Y. H., Shimizu, H., Hanaoka, N., Konagaya, M., Fujimoto, T., Suzuki, A., Chiba, T., Akiba, T., Tomaru, Y., Watanabe, K., Shimizu, N., & Horikoshi, Y. (2019). Enterovirus D68 respiratory infection in a children's hospital in Japan in 2015. Pediatrics International : Official Journal of the Japan Pediatric Society, 61(8), 768-776. https://doi.org/10.1111/ped.13903
Funakoshi Y, et al. Enterovirus D68 Respiratory Infection in a Children's Hospital in Japan in 2015. Pediatr Int. 2019;61(8):768-776. PubMed PMID: 31136073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Enterovirus D68 respiratory infection in a children's hospital in Japan in 2015. AU - Funakoshi,Yu, AU - Ito,Kenta, AU - Morino,Saeko, AU - Kinoshita,Kazue, AU - Morikawa,Yoshihiko, AU - Kono,Tatsuo, AU - Doan,Yen Hai, AU - Shimizu,Hiroyuki, AU - Hanaoka,Nozomu, AU - Konagaya,Masami, AU - Fujimoto,Tsuguto, AU - Suzuki,Ai, AU - Chiba,Takashi, AU - Akiba,Tetsuya, AU - Tomaru,Yasuhiro, AU - Watanabe,Ken, AU - Shimizu,Norio, AU - Horikoshi,Yuho, Y1 - 2019/08/22/ PY - 2018/04/27/received PY - 2019/02/22/revised PY - 2019/04/04/accepted PY - 2019/5/29/pubmed PY - 2020/2/13/medline PY - 2019/5/29/entrez KW - asthma KW - children KW - disease outbreak KW - enterovirus 68 SP - 768 EP - 776 JF - Pediatrics international : official journal of the Japan Pediatric Society JO - Pediatr Int VL - 61 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) respiratory infections in children were reported globally in 2014. In Japan, there was an EV-D68 outbreak in the autumn of 2015 (September-October). The aim of this study was to compare EV-D68-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive and EV-D68-specific PCR-negative patients. METHODS: Pediatric patients admitted for any respiratory symptoms between September and October 2015 were enrolled. Nasopharyngeal swabs were tested for multiplex respiratory virus PCR and EV-D68-specific reverse transcription-PCR. EV-D68-specific PCR-positive and -negative patients were compared regarding demographic data and clinical information. RESULTS: A nasopharyngeal swab was obtained from 76 of 165 patients admitted with respiratory symptoms during the study period. EV-D68 was detected in 40 samples (52.6%). Median age in the EV-D68-specific PCR-positive and -negative groups was 3.0 years (IQR, 5.5 years) and 3.0 years (IQR, 4.0 years), respectively. The rates of coinfection in the two groups were 32.5% and 47.2%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the history of asthma or recurrent wheezing, length of hospitalization, or pediatric intensive care unit admission rate between the groups. The median days between symptom onset and admission was significantly lower for the EV-D68-positive group (3.0 days vs 5.0 days, P = 0.001). EV-D68 was identified as clade B on phylogenetic analysis. No cases of acute flaccid myelitis were encountered. CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the samples from the children admitted with respiratory symptoms were positive for EV-D68-specific PCR during the outbreak. Asthma history was not associated with the risk of developing severe respiratory infection. SN - 1442-200X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31136073/Enterovirus_D68_respiratory_infection_in_a_children's_hospital_in_Japan_in_2015_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ped.13903 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -