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Low-Load vs. High-Load Resistance Training to Failure on One Repetition Maximum Strength and Body Composition in Untrained Women.
J Strength Cond Res. 2019 Jul; 33(7):1737-1744.JS

Abstract

Dinyer, TK, Byrd, MT, Garver, MJ, Rickard, AJ, Miller, WM, Burns, S, Clasey, JL, and Bergstrom, HC. Low-load vs. high-load resistance training to failure on one repetition maximum strength and body composition in untrained women. J Strength Cond Res 33(7): 1737-1744, 2019-This study examined the effects of resistance training (RT) to failure at low and high loads on one repetition maximum (1RM) strength and body composition (bone- and fat-free mass [BFFM] and percent body fat [%BF]) in untrained women. Twenty-three untrained women (age: 21.2 ± 2.2 years; height: 167.1 ± 5.7 cm; body mass: 62.3 ± 16.2 kg) completed a 12-week RT to failure intervention at a low (30% 1RM) (n = 11) or high (80% 1RM) (n = 12) load. On weeks 1, 5, and 12, subjects completed 1RM testing for 4 different exercises (leg extension [LE], seated military press [SMP], leg curl [LC], and lat pull down [LPD]) and a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan to assess body composition. During weeks 2-4 and 6-7, the subjects completed 2 sets to failure for each exercise. During weeks 8-11, the subjects completed 3 sets to failure for each exercise. The 1RM strength increased from week 1 to week 5 (LE: 18 ± 16%; SMP: 9 ± 11%; LC: 12 ± 22%; LPD: 13 ± 9%), week 1 to week 12 (LE: 32 ± 24%; SMP: 17 ± 14%; LC: 23 ± 26%; LPD: 25 ± 13%), and week 5 to week 12 (LE: 11 ± 9%; SMP: 7 ± 9%; LC: 10 ± 7%; LPD: 11 ± 11%) in each exercise, with no significant differences between groups. There were no significant changes in BFFM (p = 0.241) or %BF (p = 0.740) for either group. Resistance training to failure at 30% 1RM and 80% 1RM resulted in similar increases in 1RM strength, but no change in BFFM or %BF. Untrained women can increase 1RM strength during RT at low and high loads, if repetitions are taken to failure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.School of Nutrition, Kinesiology, and Psychological Science, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, Missouri.School of Nutrition, Kinesiology, and Psychological Science, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, Missouri.Department of Health, Science, and Recreation Management, University of Mississippi, Oxford, Mississippi.School of Nutrition, Kinesiology, and Psychological Science, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, Missouri.Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31136545

Citation

Dinyer, Taylor K., et al. "Low-Load Vs. High-Load Resistance Training to Failure On One Repetition Maximum Strength and Body Composition in Untrained Women." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 33, no. 7, 2019, pp. 1737-1744.
Dinyer TK, Byrd MT, Garver MJ, et al. Low-Load vs. High-Load Resistance Training to Failure on One Repetition Maximum Strength and Body Composition in Untrained Women. J Strength Cond Res. 2019;33(7):1737-1744.
Dinyer, T. K., Byrd, M. T., Garver, M. J., Rickard, A. J., Miller, W. M., Burns, S., Clasey, J. L., & Bergstrom, H. C. (2019). Low-Load vs. High-Load Resistance Training to Failure on One Repetition Maximum Strength and Body Composition in Untrained Women. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 33(7), 1737-1744. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003194
Dinyer TK, et al. Low-Load Vs. High-Load Resistance Training to Failure On One Repetition Maximum Strength and Body Composition in Untrained Women. J Strength Cond Res. 2019;33(7):1737-1744. PubMed PMID: 31136545.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low-Load vs. High-Load Resistance Training to Failure on One Repetition Maximum Strength and Body Composition in Untrained Women. AU - Dinyer,Taylor K, AU - Byrd,M Travis, AU - Garver,Matthew J, AU - Rickard,Alex J, AU - Miller,William M, AU - Burns,Steve, AU - Clasey,Jody L, AU - Bergstrom,Haley C, PY - 2019/5/29/pubmed PY - 2019/9/26/medline PY - 2019/5/29/entrez SP - 1737 EP - 1744 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 33 IS - 7 N2 - Dinyer, TK, Byrd, MT, Garver, MJ, Rickard, AJ, Miller, WM, Burns, S, Clasey, JL, and Bergstrom, HC. Low-load vs. high-load resistance training to failure on one repetition maximum strength and body composition in untrained women. J Strength Cond Res 33(7): 1737-1744, 2019-This study examined the effects of resistance training (RT) to failure at low and high loads on one repetition maximum (1RM) strength and body composition (bone- and fat-free mass [BFFM] and percent body fat [%BF]) in untrained women. Twenty-three untrained women (age: 21.2 ± 2.2 years; height: 167.1 ± 5.7 cm; body mass: 62.3 ± 16.2 kg) completed a 12-week RT to failure intervention at a low (30% 1RM) (n = 11) or high (80% 1RM) (n = 12) load. On weeks 1, 5, and 12, subjects completed 1RM testing for 4 different exercises (leg extension [LE], seated military press [SMP], leg curl [LC], and lat pull down [LPD]) and a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan to assess body composition. During weeks 2-4 and 6-7, the subjects completed 2 sets to failure for each exercise. During weeks 8-11, the subjects completed 3 sets to failure for each exercise. The 1RM strength increased from week 1 to week 5 (LE: 18 ± 16%; SMP: 9 ± 11%; LC: 12 ± 22%; LPD: 13 ± 9%), week 1 to week 12 (LE: 32 ± 24%; SMP: 17 ± 14%; LC: 23 ± 26%; LPD: 25 ± 13%), and week 5 to week 12 (LE: 11 ± 9%; SMP: 7 ± 9%; LC: 10 ± 7%; LPD: 11 ± 11%) in each exercise, with no significant differences between groups. There were no significant changes in BFFM (p = 0.241) or %BF (p = 0.740) for either group. Resistance training to failure at 30% 1RM and 80% 1RM resulted in similar increases in 1RM strength, but no change in BFFM or %BF. Untrained women can increase 1RM strength during RT at low and high loads, if repetitions are taken to failure. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31136545/Low_Load_vs__High_Load_Resistance_Training_to_Failure_on_One_Repetition_Maximum_Strength_and_Body_Composition_in_Untrained_Women_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003194 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -