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Bee pathogen transmission dynamics: deposition, persistence and acquisition on flowers.
Proc Biol Sci 2019; 286(1903):20190603PB

Abstract

Infectious diseases are a primary driver of bee decline worldwide, but limited understanding of how pathogens are transmitted hampers effective management. Flowers have been implicated as hubs of bee disease transmission, but we know little about how interspecific floral variation affects transmission dynamics. Using bumblebees (Bombus impatiens), a trypanosomatid pathogen (Crithidia bombi) and three plant species varying in floral morphology, we assessed how host infection and plant species affect pathogen deposition on flowers, and plant species and flower parts impact pathogen survival and acquisition at flowers. We found that host infection with Crithidia increased defaecation rates on flowers, and that bees deposited faeces onto bracts of Lobelia siphilitica and Lythrum salicaria more frequently than onto Monarda didyma bracts . Among flower parts, bracts were associated with the lowest pathogen survival but highest resulting infection intensity in bee hosts. Additionally, we found that Crithidia survival across flower parts was reduced with sun exposure. These results suggest that efficiency of pathogen transmission depends on where deposition occurs and the timing and place of acquisition, which varies among plant species and environmental conditions. This information could be used for development of wildflower mixes that maximize forage while minimizing disease spread.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Entomology, Cornell University , Ithaca, NY 14853 , USA.2 Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts , Amherst, MA 01003 , USA.2 Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts , Amherst, MA 01003 , USA.2 Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts , Amherst, MA 01003 , USA.2 Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts , Amherst, MA 01003 , USA.2 Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts , Amherst, MA 01003 , USA.2 Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts , Amherst, MA 01003 , USA.2 Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts , Amherst, MA 01003 , USA.3 Department of Applied Ecology, North Carolina State University , 127 David Clark Laboratories, Raleigh, NC 27695 , USA.1 Department of Entomology, Cornell University , Ithaca, NY 14853 , USA.2 Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts , Amherst, MA 01003 , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31138075

Citation

Figueroa, Laura L., et al. "Bee Pathogen Transmission Dynamics: Deposition, Persistence and Acquisition On Flowers." Proceedings. Biological Sciences, vol. 286, no. 1903, 2019, p. 20190603.
Figueroa LL, Blinder M, Grincavitch C, et al. Bee pathogen transmission dynamics: deposition, persistence and acquisition on flowers. Proc Biol Sci. 2019;286(1903):20190603.
Figueroa, L. L., Blinder, M., Grincavitch, C., Jelinek, A., Mann, E. K., Merva, L. A., ... Adler, L. S. (2019). Bee pathogen transmission dynamics: deposition, persistence and acquisition on flowers. Proceedings. Biological Sciences, 286(1903), p. 20190603. doi:10.1098/rspb.2019.0603.
Figueroa LL, et al. Bee Pathogen Transmission Dynamics: Deposition, Persistence and Acquisition On Flowers. Proc Biol Sci. 2019 May 29;286(1903):20190603. PubMed PMID: 31138075.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bee pathogen transmission dynamics: deposition, persistence and acquisition on flowers. AU - Figueroa,Laura L, AU - Blinder,Malcolm, AU - Grincavitch,Cali, AU - Jelinek,Angus, AU - Mann,Emilia K, AU - Merva,Liam A, AU - Metz,Lucy E, AU - Zhao,Amy Y, AU - Irwin,Rebecca E, AU - McArt,Scott H, AU - Adler,Lynn S, Y1 - 2019/05/29/ PY - 2020/05/29/pmc-release PY - 2019/5/30/entrez PY - 2019/5/30/pubmed PY - 2019/5/30/medline KW - Bombus impatiens KW - Crithidia bombi KW - disease spread KW - floral morphology KW - pollinator health SP - 20190603 EP - 20190603 JF - Proceedings. Biological sciences JO - Proc. Biol. Sci. VL - 286 IS - 1903 N2 - Infectious diseases are a primary driver of bee decline worldwide, but limited understanding of how pathogens are transmitted hampers effective management. Flowers have been implicated as hubs of bee disease transmission, but we know little about how interspecific floral variation affects transmission dynamics. Using bumblebees (Bombus impatiens), a trypanosomatid pathogen (Crithidia bombi) and three plant species varying in floral morphology, we assessed how host infection and plant species affect pathogen deposition on flowers, and plant species and flower parts impact pathogen survival and acquisition at flowers. We found that host infection with Crithidia increased defaecation rates on flowers, and that bees deposited faeces onto bracts of Lobelia siphilitica and Lythrum salicaria more frequently than onto Monarda didyma bracts . Among flower parts, bracts were associated with the lowest pathogen survival but highest resulting infection intensity in bee hosts. Additionally, we found that Crithidia survival across flower parts was reduced with sun exposure. These results suggest that efficiency of pathogen transmission depends on where deposition occurs and the timing and place of acquisition, which varies among plant species and environmental conditions. This information could be used for development of wildflower mixes that maximize forage while minimizing disease spread. SN - 1471-2954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31138075/Bee_pathogen_transmission_dynamics:_deposition,_persistence_and_acquisition_on_flowers L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rspb.2019.0603?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -