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Outpatient Prescription Opioid Use in Pediatric Medicaid Enrollees With Special Health Care Needs.
Pediatrics 2019; 143(6)Ped

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Although potentially dangerous, little is known about outpatient opioid exposure (OE) in children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN). We assessed the prevalence and types of OE and the diagnoses and health care encounters proximal to OE in CYSHCN.

METHODS

This is a retrospective cohort study of 2 597 987 CYSHCN aged 0-to-18 years from 11 states, continuously enrolled in Medicaid in 2016, with ≥1 chronic condition. OE included any filled prescription (single or multiple) for opioids. Health care encounters were assessed within 7 days before and 7 and 30 days after OE.

RESULTS

Among CYSHCN, 7.4% had OE. CYSHCN with OE versus without OE were older (ages 10-18 years: 69.4% vs 47.7%), had more chronic conditions (≥3 conditions: 49.1% vs 30.6%), and had more polypharmacy (≥5 other medication classes: 54.7% vs 31.2%), P < .001 for all. Most (76.7%) OEs were single fills with a median duration of 4 days (interquartile range: 3-6). The most common OEs were acetaminophen-hydrocodone (47.5%), acetaminophen-codeine (21.5%), and oxycodone (9.5%). Emergency department visits preceded 28.8% of OEs, followed by outpatient surgery (28.8%) and outpatient specialty care (19.1%). Most OEs were preceded by a diagnosis of infection (25.9%) or injury (22.3%). Only 35.1% and 62.2% of OEs were associated with follow-up visits within 7 and 30 days, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

OE in CYSHCN is common, especially with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy. In subsequent studies, researchers should examine the appropriateness of opioid prescribing, particularly in emergency departments, as well as assess for drug interactions with chronic medications and reasons for insufficient follow-up.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado; james.feinstein@ucdenver.edu.Children's Hospital Association, Lenexa, Kansas.Children's Hospital Association, Lenexa, Kansas.Division of General Pediatrics, Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, PolicyLab, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.Department of Pediatrics, Children's Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri; and.Department of Pediatrics, Children's Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri; and.Department of Pediatrics, Children's Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri; and.Complex Care Service, Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts.Complex Care Service, Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31138667

Citation

Feinstein, James A., et al. "Outpatient Prescription Opioid Use in Pediatric Medicaid Enrollees With Special Health Care Needs." Pediatrics, vol. 143, no. 6, 2019.
Feinstein JA, Rodean J, Hall M, et al. Outpatient Prescription Opioid Use in Pediatric Medicaid Enrollees With Special Health Care Needs. Pediatrics. 2019;143(6).
Feinstein, J. A., Rodean, J., Hall, M., Doupnik, S. K., Gay, J. C., Markham, J. L., ... Berry, J. G. (2019). Outpatient Prescription Opioid Use in Pediatric Medicaid Enrollees With Special Health Care Needs. Pediatrics, 143(6), doi:10.1542/peds.2018-2199.
Feinstein JA, et al. Outpatient Prescription Opioid Use in Pediatric Medicaid Enrollees With Special Health Care Needs. Pediatrics. 2019;143(6) PubMed PMID: 31138667.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Outpatient Prescription Opioid Use in Pediatric Medicaid Enrollees With Special Health Care Needs. AU - Feinstein,James A, AU - Rodean,Jonathan, AU - Hall,Matt, AU - Doupnik,Stephanie K, AU - Gay,James C, AU - Markham,Jessica L, AU - Bettenhausen,Jessica L, AU - Simmons,Julia, AU - Garrity,Brigid, AU - Berry,Jay G, PY - 2019/03/18/accepted PY - 2020/06/01/pmc-release PY - 2019/5/30/pubmed PY - 2019/5/30/medline PY - 2019/5/30/entrez JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 143 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although potentially dangerous, little is known about outpatient opioid exposure (OE) in children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN). We assessed the prevalence and types of OE and the diagnoses and health care encounters proximal to OE in CYSHCN. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of 2 597 987 CYSHCN aged 0-to-18 years from 11 states, continuously enrolled in Medicaid in 2016, with ≥1 chronic condition. OE included any filled prescription (single or multiple) for opioids. Health care encounters were assessed within 7 days before and 7 and 30 days after OE. RESULTS: Among CYSHCN, 7.4% had OE. CYSHCN with OE versus without OE were older (ages 10-18 years: 69.4% vs 47.7%), had more chronic conditions (≥3 conditions: 49.1% vs 30.6%), and had more polypharmacy (≥5 other medication classes: 54.7% vs 31.2%), P < .001 for all. Most (76.7%) OEs were single fills with a median duration of 4 days (interquartile range: 3-6). The most common OEs were acetaminophen-hydrocodone (47.5%), acetaminophen-codeine (21.5%), and oxycodone (9.5%). Emergency department visits preceded 28.8% of OEs, followed by outpatient surgery (28.8%) and outpatient specialty care (19.1%). Most OEs were preceded by a diagnosis of infection (25.9%) or injury (22.3%). Only 35.1% and 62.2% of OEs were associated with follow-up visits within 7 and 30 days, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: OE in CYSHCN is common, especially with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy. In subsequent studies, researchers should examine the appropriateness of opioid prescribing, particularly in emergency departments, as well as assess for drug interactions with chronic medications and reasons for insufficient follow-up. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31138667/Outpatient_Prescription_Opioid_Use_in_Pediatric_Medicaid_Enrollees_With_Special_Health_Care_Needs L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=31138667 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -