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Harmful and nutrient elements in paddy soils and their transfer into rice grains (Oryza sativa) along two river systems in northern and central Vietnam.
Environ Geochem Health. 2020 Jan; 42(1):191-207.EG

Abstract

Thirty soil samples and 24 corresponding unpolished rice samples along the Red and Huong Rivers in northern and central Vietnam respectively, were analyzed in order to evaluate (a) soil geochemistry, (b) factors that determine the transfer of harmful and nutrient elements from soils into rice grains, (c) health risk to the local population through rice consumption. The concentrations of As, Bi, and U in the soils of this area are higher relative to those of average shale probably due to natural redox-related processes. Also, Zn, Ce, Th, La, Sn, Pb, and Cd are accumulated in some soils because of mining activities or industrial wastewater application. Arsenic concentrations exceed the Vietnamese allowable limit of 15 mg kg-1 in 80% of the tested soils. Twelve percent of the unpolished rice grains surpass the permissible maximum concentration of 0.2 mg Cd kg-1 grain dry matter by FAO/WHO and European Union, and all samples are below the Pb limit. The daily intake of As is within the range of the tolerable intake levels proposed by the European Food Safety Authority. Influences of soil parameters such as pH value, contents of soil organic matter, oxides/hydroxides of Al, Fe, and Mn cause a broad spread of transfer factors from soil to grains. Positive trends exist between the transfer factors within the groups (a) As, Sb, and U, (b) Co, Cu, Ni, and Zn, (c) Cd and Mn which indicate similar influences of soil parameters on their uptake. We propose that the allowable Cd maximum concentration for rice should be set to less than 0.2 mg kg-1. The analysis of As and Cd concentrations in soils and corresponding rice grains as well as the soil pH value should be made obligatory in order to prevent intoxication. In addition, critical elements from nonferrous metal mining and industrial areas should also be evaluated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sedimentology and Environmental Geology, Faculty of Geoscience and Geography, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Goldschmidtstr. 3, 37077, Göttingen, Germany. thuy-phuong.nguyen@geo.uni-goettingen.de. Department of Environment and Resources Management, Faculty of Land Resources and Agricultural Environment, Hue University of Agriculture and Forestry, 102 Phung Hung Street, Hue City, Vietnam. thuy-phuong.nguyen@geo.uni-goettingen.de.Department of Sedimentology and Environmental Geology, Faculty of Geoscience and Geography, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Goldschmidtstr. 3, 37077, Göttingen, Germany.Department of Sedimentology and Environmental Geology, Faculty of Geoscience and Geography, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Goldschmidtstr. 3, 37077, Göttingen, Germany.Department of Sedimentology and Environmental Geology, Faculty of Geoscience and Geography, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Goldschmidtstr. 3, 37077, Göttingen, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31140133

Citation

Nguyen, Thuy Phuong, et al. "Harmful and Nutrient Elements in Paddy Soils and Their Transfer Into Rice Grains (Oryza Sativa) Along Two River Systems in Northern and Central Vietnam." Environmental Geochemistry and Health, vol. 42, no. 1, 2020, pp. 191-207.
Nguyen TP, Ruppert H, Sauer B, et al. Harmful and nutrient elements in paddy soils and their transfer into rice grains (Oryza sativa) along two river systems in northern and central Vietnam. Environ Geochem Health. 2020;42(1):191-207.
Nguyen, T. P., Ruppert, H., Sauer, B., & Pasold, T. (2020). Harmful and nutrient elements in paddy soils and their transfer into rice grains (Oryza sativa) along two river systems in northern and central Vietnam. Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 42(1), 191-207. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10653-019-00333-3
Nguyen TP, et al. Harmful and Nutrient Elements in Paddy Soils and Their Transfer Into Rice Grains (Oryza Sativa) Along Two River Systems in Northern and Central Vietnam. Environ Geochem Health. 2020;42(1):191-207. PubMed PMID: 31140133.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Harmful and nutrient elements in paddy soils and their transfer into rice grains (Oryza sativa) along two river systems in northern and central Vietnam. AU - Nguyen,Thuy Phuong, AU - Ruppert,Hans, AU - Sauer,Benedikt, AU - Pasold,Tino, Y1 - 2019/05/28/ PY - 2018/12/20/received PY - 2019/05/21/accepted PY - 2019/5/30/pubmed PY - 2020/4/9/medline PY - 2019/5/30/entrez KW - Harmful elements KW - Human health KW - Nutrients KW - Paddy soils KW - Unpolished rice KW - Vietnam SP - 191 EP - 207 JF - Environmental geochemistry and health JO - Environ Geochem Health VL - 42 IS - 1 N2 - Thirty soil samples and 24 corresponding unpolished rice samples along the Red and Huong Rivers in northern and central Vietnam respectively, were analyzed in order to evaluate (a) soil geochemistry, (b) factors that determine the transfer of harmful and nutrient elements from soils into rice grains, (c) health risk to the local population through rice consumption. The concentrations of As, Bi, and U in the soils of this area are higher relative to those of average shale probably due to natural redox-related processes. Also, Zn, Ce, Th, La, Sn, Pb, and Cd are accumulated in some soils because of mining activities or industrial wastewater application. Arsenic concentrations exceed the Vietnamese allowable limit of 15 mg kg-1 in 80% of the tested soils. Twelve percent of the unpolished rice grains surpass the permissible maximum concentration of 0.2 mg Cd kg-1 grain dry matter by FAO/WHO and European Union, and all samples are below the Pb limit. The daily intake of As is within the range of the tolerable intake levels proposed by the European Food Safety Authority. Influences of soil parameters such as pH value, contents of soil organic matter, oxides/hydroxides of Al, Fe, and Mn cause a broad spread of transfer factors from soil to grains. Positive trends exist between the transfer factors within the groups (a) As, Sb, and U, (b) Co, Cu, Ni, and Zn, (c) Cd and Mn which indicate similar influences of soil parameters on their uptake. We propose that the allowable Cd maximum concentration for rice should be set to less than 0.2 mg kg-1. The analysis of As and Cd concentrations in soils and corresponding rice grains as well as the soil pH value should be made obligatory in order to prevent intoxication. In addition, critical elements from nonferrous metal mining and industrial areas should also be evaluated. SN - 1573-2983 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31140133/Harmful_and_nutrient_elements_in_paddy_soils_and_their_transfer_into_rice_grains__Oryza_sativa__along_two_river_systems_in_northern_and_central_Vietnam_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -