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Microbiota Contribute to Obesity-related Increases in the Pulmonary Response to Ozone.
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2019 12; 61(6):702-712.AJ

Abstract

Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, especially nonatopic asthma, and attenuates the efficacy of standard asthma therapeutics. Obesity also augments pulmonary responses to ozone, a nonatopic asthma trigger. The purpose of this study was to determine whether obesity-related alterations in gut microbiota contribute to these augmented responses to ozone. Ozone-induced increases in airway responsiveness, a canonical feature of asthma, were greater in obese db/db mice than in lean wild-type control mice. Depletion of gut microbiota with a cocktail of antibiotics attenuated obesity-related increases in the response to ozone, indicating a role for microbiota. Moreover, ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was greater in germ-free mice that had been reconstituted with colonic contents of db/db than in wild-type mice. In addition, compared with dietary supplementation with the nonfermentable fiber cellulose, dietary supplementation with the fermentable fiber pectin attenuated obesity-related increases in the pulmonary response to ozone, likely by reducing ozone-induced release of IL-17A. Our data indicate a role for microbiota in obesity-related increases in the response to an asthma trigger and suggest that microbiome-based therapies such as prebiotics may provide an alternative therapeutic strategy for obese patients with asthma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Health and.Department of Environmental Health and.Department of Environmental Health and.Department of Environmental Health and.Massachusetts Host Microbiome Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; and.Massachusetts Host Microbiome Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; and.Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts.Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Environmental Health and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31144984

Citation

Tashiro, Hiroki, et al. "Microbiota Contribute to Obesity-related Increases in the Pulmonary Response to Ozone." American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 61, no. 6, 2019, pp. 702-712.
Tashiro H, Cho Y, Kasahara DI, et al. Microbiota Contribute to Obesity-related Increases in the Pulmonary Response to Ozone. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2019;61(6):702-712.
Tashiro, H., Cho, Y., Kasahara, D. I., Brand, J. D., Bry, L., Yeliseyev, V., Abu-Ali, G., Huttenhower, C., & Shore, S. A. (2019). Microbiota Contribute to Obesity-related Increases in the Pulmonary Response to Ozone. American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, 61(6), 702-712. https://doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2019-0144OC
Tashiro H, et al. Microbiota Contribute to Obesity-related Increases in the Pulmonary Response to Ozone. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2019;61(6):702-712. PubMed PMID: 31144984.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbiota Contribute to Obesity-related Increases in the Pulmonary Response to Ozone. AU - Tashiro,Hiroki, AU - Cho,Youngji, AU - Kasahara,David I, AU - Brand,Jeffrey D, AU - Bry,Lynn, AU - Yeliseyev,Vladimir, AU - Abu-Ali,Galeb, AU - Huttenhower,Curtis, AU - Shore,Stephanie A, PY - 2020/12/01/pmc-release PY - 2019/5/31/pubmed PY - 2020/4/25/medline PY - 2019/5/31/entrez KW - airway responsiveness KW - dietary fiber KW - gut microbiome KW - neutrophil KW - obesity SP - 702 EP - 712 JF - American journal of respiratory cell and molecular biology JO - Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. VL - 61 IS - 6 N2 - Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, especially nonatopic asthma, and attenuates the efficacy of standard asthma therapeutics. Obesity also augments pulmonary responses to ozone, a nonatopic asthma trigger. The purpose of this study was to determine whether obesity-related alterations in gut microbiota contribute to these augmented responses to ozone. Ozone-induced increases in airway responsiveness, a canonical feature of asthma, were greater in obese db/db mice than in lean wild-type control mice. Depletion of gut microbiota with a cocktail of antibiotics attenuated obesity-related increases in the response to ozone, indicating a role for microbiota. Moreover, ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was greater in germ-free mice that had been reconstituted with colonic contents of db/db than in wild-type mice. In addition, compared with dietary supplementation with the nonfermentable fiber cellulose, dietary supplementation with the fermentable fiber pectin attenuated obesity-related increases in the pulmonary response to ozone, likely by reducing ozone-induced release of IL-17A. Our data indicate a role for microbiota in obesity-related increases in the response to an asthma trigger and suggest that microbiome-based therapies such as prebiotics may provide an alternative therapeutic strategy for obese patients with asthma. SN - 1535-4989 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31144984/Microbiota_contribute_to_obesity_related_increases_in_the_pulmonary_response_to_ozone_ L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1165/rcmb.2019-0144OC?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -