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Prenatal maternal distress associates with a blunted cortisol response in rhinovirus-positive infants.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2019 09; 107:187-190.P

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Prenatal exposure to maternal psychological distress (PD) may have programming effects on the fetus/infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and subsequently on the development of the fetus' immune function. Therefore, our aim was to study whether prenatal exposure to PD is related to early infant HPA axis reactivity in the context of a subclinical rhinovirus infection that challenges infants HPA axis postnatally.

METHODS

This study included 336 10-week-old infants from the nested case control Focus Cohort of the FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. The outcome was infant HPA axis reactivity in a stress test. The acute stressor comprised of pediatric examination with venipuncture and nasal swabs for virus assessment. Saliva cortisol samples were collected at 5 time points: baseline, 0, 15, 25 and 35 min after the stressor. HPA axis reactivity was defined by the cumulative post-stressor cortisol concentration.

RESULTS

HPA axis reactivity was blunted in the PD/rhinovirus + group compared to the average of control/rhinovirus+, PD/rhinovirus-, and control/rhinovirus- groups (difference: 14.7 ln [nmol/L] × min, 95% confidence interval 3.8-25.6, p = .008). HPA axis reactivity was significantly blunted only in boys with rhinovirus detected when separately tested for boys and girls (p = .04).

CONCLUSION

Our finding of PD-exposed rhinovirus-positive infants having blunted cortisol secretion gives rise to a hypothesis that maternal PD during pregnancy influences infant HPA axis functioning and the functioning of the immune system. Future studies are needed to test whether this suppression of the HPA axis that co-occurs with rhinovirus infection associates with later disease development (e.g., asthma).

Authors+Show Affiliations

FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, P.O. Box 52, 20521, Turku, Finland. Electronic address: lasula@utu.fi.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland; Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, 20520, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, P.O. Box 52, 20521, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, P.O. Box 52, 20521, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Kiinamyllynkatu 4-8, Building 11B, 20520, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, P.O. Box 52, 20521, Turku, Finland.Department of Clinical Microbiology, Turku University Hospital, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, 20520, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Kiinamyllynkatu 4-8, Building 11B, 20520, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 3A, Teutori building, 2(nd)floor, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Building 10, Kiinamyllynkatu 4-8, 20521, Turku, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31146139

Citation

Korhonen, Laura S., et al. "Prenatal Maternal Distress Associates With a Blunted Cortisol Response in Rhinovirus-positive Infants." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 107, 2019, pp. 187-190.
Korhonen LS, Kortesluoma S, Lukkarinen M, et al. Prenatal maternal distress associates with a blunted cortisol response in rhinovirus-positive infants. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2019;107:187-190.
Korhonen, L. S., Kortesluoma, S., Lukkarinen, M., Peltola, V., Pesonen, H., Pelto, J., Tuulari, J. J., Lukkarinen, H., Vuorinen, T., Karlsson, H., & Karlsson, L. (2019). Prenatal maternal distress associates with a blunted cortisol response in rhinovirus-positive infants. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 107, 187-190. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2019.05.023
Korhonen LS, et al. Prenatal Maternal Distress Associates With a Blunted Cortisol Response in Rhinovirus-positive Infants. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2019;107:187-190. PubMed PMID: 31146139.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal maternal distress associates with a blunted cortisol response in rhinovirus-positive infants. AU - Korhonen,Laura S, AU - Kortesluoma,Susanna, AU - Lukkarinen,Minna, AU - Peltola,Ville, AU - Pesonen,Henri, AU - Pelto,Juho, AU - Tuulari,Jetro J, AU - Lukkarinen,Heikki, AU - Vuorinen,Tytti, AU - Karlsson,Hasse, AU - Karlsson,Linnea, Y1 - 2019/05/23/ PY - 2018/11/04/received PY - 2019/05/22/revised PY - 2019/05/22/accepted PY - 2019/5/31/pubmed PY - 2020/5/19/medline PY - 2019/5/31/entrez KW - Cortisol KW - HPA axis KW - Infant KW - Prenatal distress KW - Programming KW - Rhinovirus SP - 187 EP - 190 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 107 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Prenatal exposure to maternal psychological distress (PD) may have programming effects on the fetus/infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and subsequently on the development of the fetus' immune function. Therefore, our aim was to study whether prenatal exposure to PD is related to early infant HPA axis reactivity in the context of a subclinical rhinovirus infection that challenges infants HPA axis postnatally. METHODS: This study included 336 10-week-old infants from the nested case control Focus Cohort of the FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. The outcome was infant HPA axis reactivity in a stress test. The acute stressor comprised of pediatric examination with venipuncture and nasal swabs for virus assessment. Saliva cortisol samples were collected at 5 time points: baseline, 0, 15, 25 and 35 min after the stressor. HPA axis reactivity was defined by the cumulative post-stressor cortisol concentration. RESULTS: HPA axis reactivity was blunted in the PD/rhinovirus + group compared to the average of control/rhinovirus+, PD/rhinovirus-, and control/rhinovirus- groups (difference: 14.7 ln [nmol/L] × min, 95% confidence interval 3.8-25.6, p = .008). HPA axis reactivity was significantly blunted only in boys with rhinovirus detected when separately tested for boys and girls (p = .04). CONCLUSION: Our finding of PD-exposed rhinovirus-positive infants having blunted cortisol secretion gives rise to a hypothesis that maternal PD during pregnancy influences infant HPA axis functioning and the functioning of the immune system. Future studies are needed to test whether this suppression of the HPA axis that co-occurs with rhinovirus infection associates with later disease development (e.g., asthma). SN - 1873-3360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31146139/Prenatal_maternal_distress_associates_with_a_blunted_cortisol_response_in_rhinovirus_positive_infants_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(18)31072-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -