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A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess the Prevalence of Adult Thyroid Dysfunction Disorders in Jordan.
Thyroid. 2019 08; 29(8):1052-1059.T

Abstract

Background: Insufficient production of thyroid hormones results in hypothyroidism, while overproduction results in hyperthyroidism. These are common adult disorders, with hypothyroidism more common in the elderly. Jordan has had past problems with dietary iodine deficiency but there are no published studies assessing the population prevalence of these disorders in the Arab Middle East. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in three representative areas of Jordan. There were 7085 participants with a mean age of 40.8 years. Participants completed a questionnaire and had blood taken for thyroid analysis. Results:Hypothyroidism: The prevalence of any hypothyroidism (already diagnosed and/or identified by blood testing) was 17.2% in females and 9.1% in males. Undiagnosed prevalence was 8% and 6.2% for females and males, respectively. The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism, defined as high serum thyrotropin (TSH) and normal serum-free thyroxine (fT4), was 5.98% among females and 4.40% among males. The prevalence of overt hypothyroidism, defined as high TSH and low fT4, was 2.00% among females and 1.80% among males. Only 53.5% (55.3% for females, 42.1% males) of those previously diagnosed with hypothyroidism had TSH levels within the appropriate range. Hyperthyroidism: The prevalence of any hyperthyroidism (already diagnosed and/or identified by blood testing) was 1.8% in females and 2.27% in males. The undiagnosed prevalence was 1.4% and 2.1% for females and males, respectively. The prevalence of subclinical hyperthyroidism (low TSH and normal fT4) was 1.20% and 1.80% among males and females accordingly. The prevalence of overt hyperthyroidism (low TSH and high fT4) was 0.2% among females and 0.3% among males. About 85.7% (83.3% for females, 100% males) of those previously diagnosed with hyperthyroidism had TSH levels within the appropriate range. Conclusions: The results of this study reveal that the total prevalence of thyroid dysfunction among adult females and males in Jordan is very high compared with international statistics, particularly in the rates of undiagnosed cases. This indicates the need for further assessment of the value of screening for adult hypothyroidism in Jordan.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Mutah University, Karak, Jordan. 2Faculty of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.3Industrial Engineering Department; Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan. 4Industrial Engineering Department, American University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Mutah University, Karak, Jordan.6Diagnostic Radiology, AlBashir Hospital, Ministry of Health, Jordan.7King Hussein Medical Center, Royal Medical Services, Amman, Jordan.8Department of Surgery, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan.9Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine; Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31146635

Citation

Abu-Helalah, Munir, et al. "A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess the Prevalence of Adult Thyroid Dysfunction Disorders in Jordan." Thyroid : Official Journal of the American Thyroid Association, vol. 29, no. 8, 2019, pp. 1052-1059.
Abu-Helalah M, Alshraideh HA, Al-Sarayreh SA, et al. A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess the Prevalence of Adult Thyroid Dysfunction Disorders in Jordan. Thyroid. 2019;29(8):1052-1059.
Abu-Helalah, M., Alshraideh, H. A., Al-Sarayreh, S. A., Al Shawabkeh, A. H. K., Nesheiwat, A., Younes, N., & Al-Hader, A. (2019). A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess the Prevalence of Adult Thyroid Dysfunction Disorders in Jordan. Thyroid : Official Journal of the American Thyroid Association, 29(8), 1052-1059. https://doi.org/10.1089/thy.2018.0579
Abu-Helalah M, et al. A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess the Prevalence of Adult Thyroid Dysfunction Disorders in Jordan. Thyroid. 2019;29(8):1052-1059. PubMed PMID: 31146635.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess the Prevalence of Adult Thyroid Dysfunction Disorders in Jordan. AU - Abu-Helalah,Munir, AU - Alshraideh,Hussam Ahmad, AU - Al-Sarayreh,Sameeh Abdulkareem, AU - Al Shawabkeh,Ahmad Hassan Khalaf, AU - Nesheiwat,Adel, AU - Younes,Nidal, AU - Al-Hader,AbdelFattah, Y1 - 2019/07/01/ PY - 2019/5/31/pubmed PY - 2020/10/22/medline PY - 2019/6/1/entrez KW - Jordan KW - hyperthyroidism KW - hypothyroidism KW - prevalence KW - thyroid dysfunction SP - 1052 EP - 1059 JF - Thyroid : official journal of the American Thyroid Association JO - Thyroid VL - 29 IS - 8 N2 - Background: Insufficient production of thyroid hormones results in hypothyroidism, while overproduction results in hyperthyroidism. These are common adult disorders, with hypothyroidism more common in the elderly. Jordan has had past problems with dietary iodine deficiency but there are no published studies assessing the population prevalence of these disorders in the Arab Middle East. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in three representative areas of Jordan. There were 7085 participants with a mean age of 40.8 years. Participants completed a questionnaire and had blood taken for thyroid analysis. Results:Hypothyroidism: The prevalence of any hypothyroidism (already diagnosed and/or identified by blood testing) was 17.2% in females and 9.1% in males. Undiagnosed prevalence was 8% and 6.2% for females and males, respectively. The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism, defined as high serum thyrotropin (TSH) and normal serum-free thyroxine (fT4), was 5.98% among females and 4.40% among males. The prevalence of overt hypothyroidism, defined as high TSH and low fT4, was 2.00% among females and 1.80% among males. Only 53.5% (55.3% for females, 42.1% males) of those previously diagnosed with hypothyroidism had TSH levels within the appropriate range. Hyperthyroidism: The prevalence of any hyperthyroidism (already diagnosed and/or identified by blood testing) was 1.8% in females and 2.27% in males. The undiagnosed prevalence was 1.4% and 2.1% for females and males, respectively. The prevalence of subclinical hyperthyroidism (low TSH and normal fT4) was 1.20% and 1.80% among males and females accordingly. The prevalence of overt hyperthyroidism (low TSH and high fT4) was 0.2% among females and 0.3% among males. About 85.7% (83.3% for females, 100% males) of those previously diagnosed with hyperthyroidism had TSH levels within the appropriate range. Conclusions: The results of this study reveal that the total prevalence of thyroid dysfunction among adult females and males in Jordan is very high compared with international statistics, particularly in the rates of undiagnosed cases. This indicates the need for further assessment of the value of screening for adult hypothyroidism in Jordan. SN - 1557-9077 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31146635/A_Cross_Sectional_Study_to_Assess_the_Prevalence_of_Adult_Thyroid_Dysfunction_Disorders_in_Jordan_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -