Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association of gait speed and grip strength with risk of cardiovascular events in patients on haemodialysis: a prospective study.
BMC Nephrol. 2019 05 30; 20(1):196.BN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Gait speed (GS) and handgrip strength (HGS), both factors associated with frailty and sarcopenia, are reportedly associated with CV events in the general population. However, little is known about the impact of these factors on the outcome of patients on dialysis. This study aimed to evaluate whether evaluation of GS and HGS could be associated the onset of fatal/non-fatal cardiovascular (CV) events in patients on haemodialysis (HD).

METHODS

One-hundred-eighty-two patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing HD at four dialysis clinics in April 2015 provided written informed consent to participate in the study. We excluded patients who had physical disability, were unable to walk without help, or had recently experienced CV events. Usual GS over a 4-m walk and HGS were measured at baseline, and 173 patients (men, 124; women, 49) were divided into sex-specific quartiles according to GS and HGS and were followed-up for fatal/non-fatal CV events for a median of 2 years. We examined the association of GS and HGS with CV events and determined cut-off values using Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, HD duration, history of CVD, and diabetes.

RESULTS

During the follow-up period, 46 CV events occurred. Both physical performance factors were significantly associated with CV events. Low GS (< 0.82 m/s for men and 0.81 m/s for women) and weak HGS (< 29.0 kg for men and 19.7 kg for women) were associated with CV events. For low vs. high GS, the hazard ratio (HR) for CV events was 2.29 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20-4.33; P = 0.01], and for low vs. high HGS, the HR was 2.15 [95% CI: 1.00-5.04; P < 0.05]. These HRs remained significant after adjusting for confounding factors, such as sex, age, dialysis vintage, history of CV disease, and diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS

Slow GS and weak HGS in patients on HD were suggested to be independent predictors of fatal/non-fatal CV events.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Kitahachiouji Clinic, 2960-5 Ishikawa-cho, Hochiuji-shi, Tokyo, 1920032, Japan.Higashikurume Ekimae Clinic, 1-3-6 Honmachi, Higashikuruume-shi, Tokyo, 2030053, Japan. The Division of Diabetes and Metabolism, The Institute for Adult Diseases, Asahi Life Foundation, 2-2-6, Bakuro-cho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 103-0002, Japan.Department of Pharmacotherapy, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, 2-522-1 Noshio, Kiyose, Tokyo, 204-8588, Japan. kusiyaa-tky@umin.ac.jp.Kumegawa tousekinaika Clinic, 3-6-3 Onda-cho, Musashimurayama-shi, Tokyo, 189-0011, Japan.Higashiyamato Nangai Clinic, 4-2-8 Nangai, Higashiyamato-shi, Tokyo, 2070014, Japan.Kitahachiouji Clinic, 2960-5 Ishikawa-cho, Hochiuji-shi, Tokyo, 1920032, Japan.Higashikurume Clinic, 2-2-22 Shinkawa-cho, Higashikurume-shi, Tokyo, 2030013, Japan.Kodaira Kitaguchi Clinic, 2-2-11 Onuma-cho, Kodaira-shi, Tokyo, 1870001, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31146702

Citation

Kuki, Atsumi, et al. "Association of Gait Speed and Grip Strength With Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Patients On Haemodialysis: a Prospective Study." BMC Nephrology, vol. 20, no. 1, 2019, p. 196.
Kuki A, Tanaka K, Kushiyama A, et al. Association of gait speed and grip strength with risk of cardiovascular events in patients on haemodialysis: a prospective study. BMC Nephrol. 2019;20(1):196.
Kuki, A., Tanaka, K., Kushiyama, A., Tanaka, Y., Motonishi, S., Sugano, Y., Furuya, T., & Ozawa, T. (2019). Association of gait speed and grip strength with risk of cardiovascular events in patients on haemodialysis: a prospective study. BMC Nephrology, 20(1), 196. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12882-019-1370-6
Kuki A, et al. Association of Gait Speed and Grip Strength With Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Patients On Haemodialysis: a Prospective Study. BMC Nephrol. 2019 05 30;20(1):196. PubMed PMID: 31146702.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of gait speed and grip strength with risk of cardiovascular events in patients on haemodialysis: a prospective study. AU - Kuki,Atsumi, AU - Tanaka,Kentaro, AU - Kushiyama,Akifumi, AU - Tanaka,Yoshihide, AU - Motonishi,Shuta, AU - Sugano,Yasuji, AU - Furuya,Toru, AU - Ozawa,Takashi, Y1 - 2019/05/30/ PY - 2019/01/01/received PY - 2019/05/02/accepted PY - 2019/6/1/entrez PY - 2019/5/31/pubmed PY - 2020/9/1/medline KW - Cardiovascular events KW - Chronic haemodialysis KW - Physical activity KW - Prognosis SP - 196 EP - 196 JF - BMC nephrology JO - BMC Nephrol VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Gait speed (GS) and handgrip strength (HGS), both factors associated with frailty and sarcopenia, are reportedly associated with CV events in the general population. However, little is known about the impact of these factors on the outcome of patients on dialysis. This study aimed to evaluate whether evaluation of GS and HGS could be associated the onset of fatal/non-fatal cardiovascular (CV) events in patients on haemodialysis (HD). METHODS: One-hundred-eighty-two patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing HD at four dialysis clinics in April 2015 provided written informed consent to participate in the study. We excluded patients who had physical disability, were unable to walk without help, or had recently experienced CV events. Usual GS over a 4-m walk and HGS were measured at baseline, and 173 patients (men, 124; women, 49) were divided into sex-specific quartiles according to GS and HGS and were followed-up for fatal/non-fatal CV events for a median of 2 years. We examined the association of GS and HGS with CV events and determined cut-off values using Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, HD duration, history of CVD, and diabetes. RESULTS: During the follow-up period, 46 CV events occurred. Both physical performance factors were significantly associated with CV events. Low GS (< 0.82 m/s for men and 0.81 m/s for women) and weak HGS (< 29.0 kg for men and 19.7 kg for women) were associated with CV events. For low vs. high GS, the hazard ratio (HR) for CV events was 2.29 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20-4.33; P = 0.01], and for low vs. high HGS, the HR was 2.15 [95% CI: 1.00-5.04; P < 0.05]. These HRs remained significant after adjusting for confounding factors, such as sex, age, dialysis vintage, history of CV disease, and diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Slow GS and weak HGS in patients on HD were suggested to be independent predictors of fatal/non-fatal CV events. SN - 1471-2369 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31146702/Association_of_gait_speed_and_grip_strength_with_risk_of_cardiovascular_events_in_patients_on_haemodialysis:_a_prospective_study_ L2 - https://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2369/20/196 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -