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A protocol for measuring the impact of a smoke-free housing policy on indoor tobacco smoke exposure.
BMC Public Health. 2019 May 30; 19(1):666.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Tobacco remains a leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., responsible for more than 440,000 deaths each year. Approximately 10% of these deaths are attributable to exposure of non-smokers to secondhand smoke (SHS). Residents living in public multi-unit housing (MUH) are at excess risk for SHS exposure compared to the general population. On November 30, 2016, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) passed a rule requiring all public housing agencies to implement smoke-free housing (SFH) policies in their housing developments by July 30, 2018.

METHODS

As part of a larger natural experiment study, we designed a protocol to evaluate indoor SHS levels before and after policy implementation through collection of repeat indoor air samples in non-smoking apartments and common areas of select high-rise NYCHA buildings subject to the HUD SFH rule, and also from socio-demographically matched private-sector high-rise control buildings not subject to the rule. A baseline telephone survey was conducted in all selected buildings to facilitate rapid recruitment into the longitudinal study and assess smoking prevalence, behaviors, and attitudes regarding the SFH policy prior to implementation. Data collection began in early 2018 and will continue through 2021.

DISCUSSION

The baseline survey was completed by 559 NYCHA residents and 471 comparison building residents (response rates, 35, and 32%, respectively). Smoking prevalence was comparable between study arms (15.7% among NYCHA residents and 15.2% among comparison residents). The majority of residents reported supporting a building-wide smoke-free policy (63.0 and 59.9%, respectively). We enrolled 157 NYCHA and 118 comparison non-smoking households into the longitudinal air monitoring study and performed air monitoring in common areas. Follow up surveys and air monitoring in participant households occur every 6 months for 2.5 years. Capitalizing on the opportunity of this federal policy rollout, the large and diverse public housing population in NYC, and robust municipal data sources, this study offers a unique opportunity to evaluate the policy's direct impacts on SHS exposure. Methods in this protocol can inform similar SFH policy evaluations elsewhere.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 180 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, USA.Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 180 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, USA.Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 180 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, USA.Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 341 East 25th Street, New York, NY, 10010, USA.Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 180 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, USA.Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 180 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, USA.Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 180 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, USA.Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, City University of New York, New York, NY, 10027, USA.Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 341 East 25th Street, New York, NY, 10010, USA.Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 180 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, USA. lorna.thorpe@nyulangone.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31146711

Citation

Cardozo, Rodrigo Arce, et al. "A Protocol for Measuring the Impact of a Smoke-free Housing Policy On Indoor Tobacco Smoke Exposure." BMC Public Health, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019, p. 666.
Cardozo RA, Feinberg A, Tovar A, et al. A protocol for measuring the impact of a smoke-free housing policy on indoor tobacco smoke exposure. BMC Public Health. 2019;19(1):666.
Cardozo, R. A., Feinberg, A., Tovar, A., Vilcassim, M. J. R., Shelley, D., Elbel, B., Kaplan, S., Wyka, K., Rule, A. M., Gordon, T., & Thorpe, L. E. (2019). A protocol for measuring the impact of a smoke-free housing policy on indoor tobacco smoke exposure. BMC Public Health, 19(1), 666. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-7043-3
Cardozo RA, et al. A Protocol for Measuring the Impact of a Smoke-free Housing Policy On Indoor Tobacco Smoke Exposure. BMC Public Health. 2019 May 30;19(1):666. PubMed PMID: 31146711.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A protocol for measuring the impact of a smoke-free housing policy on indoor tobacco smoke exposure. AU - Cardozo,Rodrigo Arce, AU - Feinberg,Alexis, AU - Tovar,Albert, AU - Vilcassim,M J Ruzmyn, AU - Shelley,Donna, AU - Elbel,Brian, AU - Kaplan,Sue, AU - Wyka,Katarzyna, AU - Rule,Ana M, AU - Gordon,Terry, AU - Thorpe,Lorna E, Y1 - 2019/05/30/ PY - 2019/04/23/received PY - 2019/05/23/accepted PY - 2019/6/1/entrez PY - 2019/5/31/pubmed PY - 2019/7/25/medline KW - Air monitoring, protocol KW - Multi-unit housing KW - Public housing KW - Smoke free housing KW - Tobacco smoke pollution SP - 666 EP - 666 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Tobacco remains a leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., responsible for more than 440,000 deaths each year. Approximately 10% of these deaths are attributable to exposure of non-smokers to secondhand smoke (SHS). Residents living in public multi-unit housing (MUH) are at excess risk for SHS exposure compared to the general population. On November 30, 2016, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) passed a rule requiring all public housing agencies to implement smoke-free housing (SFH) policies in their housing developments by July 30, 2018. METHODS: As part of a larger natural experiment study, we designed a protocol to evaluate indoor SHS levels before and after policy implementation through collection of repeat indoor air samples in non-smoking apartments and common areas of select high-rise NYCHA buildings subject to the HUD SFH rule, and also from socio-demographically matched private-sector high-rise control buildings not subject to the rule. A baseline telephone survey was conducted in all selected buildings to facilitate rapid recruitment into the longitudinal study and assess smoking prevalence, behaviors, and attitudes regarding the SFH policy prior to implementation. Data collection began in early 2018 and will continue through 2021. DISCUSSION: The baseline survey was completed by 559 NYCHA residents and 471 comparison building residents (response rates, 35, and 32%, respectively). Smoking prevalence was comparable between study arms (15.7% among NYCHA residents and 15.2% among comparison residents). The majority of residents reported supporting a building-wide smoke-free policy (63.0 and 59.9%, respectively). We enrolled 157 NYCHA and 118 comparison non-smoking households into the longitudinal air monitoring study and performed air monitoring in common areas. Follow up surveys and air monitoring in participant households occur every 6 months for 2.5 years. Capitalizing on the opportunity of this federal policy rollout, the large and diverse public housing population in NYC, and robust municipal data sources, this study offers a unique opportunity to evaluate the policy's direct impacts on SHS exposure. Methods in this protocol can inform similar SFH policy evaluations elsewhere. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31146711/A_protocol_for_measuring_the_impact_of_a_smoke_free_housing_policy_on_indoor_tobacco_smoke_exposure_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-019-7043-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -