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The residual dentition among New Zealanders in aged residential care.
Gerodontology. 2019 Sep; 36(3):216-222.G

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Descriptions of the older population's dentition status are usually limited to indicators such as the edentulous proportion, the mean number of restored and missing teeth, and the proportion with a functional dentition, with very few reports describing in detail the nature of the residual dentition.

OBJECTIVES

This study described the residual dentition among older New Zealanders living in residential aged care facilities.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Using national data from the Older People's Oral Health Survey, we determined the residual dentition arrangement and Kennedy classification for each dental arch. Individuals were categorised according to their maxillary-mandibular dental configuration. Data were weighted to make the estimates generalisable to the source population.

RESULTS

Among the dentate 45% of the 987 clinically examined participants, the most prevalent configuration was maxillary tooth-bounded saddles against a partially dentate lower (24.7%; 95% CI: 20.4, 29.7). More younger participants generally had less tooth loss experience and had higher prevalence of Kennedy Classes II, III and IV. There were few sex differences, although more females had a fully dentate arch. Marked ethnic differences were observed: Māori were up to eight times as likely to have only mandibular anterior teeth remaining. Upper dentures were worn more than their lower counterpart. Age, sex and ethnic characteristics were associated with particular residual teeth configurations.

CONCLUSIONS

Having various degrees of tooth loss was the norm, with the upper tooth-bounded saddles against any partially dentate lower combination most common, and limited to females. An edentulous maxilla opposed by some standing teeth was observed in over one-quarter of the population, and most common among Māori and those who were older. Maxillary prostheses were much more common than mandibular ones. Caring for dentate older people in aged residential care is likely to be complicated by the wide range of dentition configurations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sir John Walsh Research Institute, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.CBG Health Research Ltd, Auckland, New Zealand.Sir John Walsh Research Institute, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31148261

Citation

Hyland, Natalie, et al. "The Residual Dentition Among New Zealanders in Aged Residential Care." Gerodontology, vol. 36, no. 3, 2019, pp. 216-222.
Hyland N, Smith MB, Gribben B, et al. The residual dentition among New Zealanders in aged residential care. Gerodontology. 2019;36(3):216-222.
Hyland, N., Smith, M. B., Gribben, B., & Thomson, W. M. (2019). The residual dentition among New Zealanders in aged residential care. Gerodontology, 36(3), 216-222. https://doi.org/10.1111/ger.12414
Hyland N, et al. The Residual Dentition Among New Zealanders in Aged Residential Care. Gerodontology. 2019;36(3):216-222. PubMed PMID: 31148261.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The residual dentition among New Zealanders in aged residential care. AU - Hyland,Natalie, AU - Smith,Moira B, AU - Gribben,Barry, AU - Thomson,William M, Y1 - 2019/05/30/ PY - 2019/03/03/received PY - 2019/04/18/revised PY - 2019/04/20/accepted PY - 2019/5/31/pubmed PY - 2019/10/30/medline PY - 2019/6/1/entrez KW - dependency KW - epidemiological study KW - ethnicity KW - residual dentition KW - tooth loss SP - 216 EP - 222 JF - Gerodontology JO - Gerodontology VL - 36 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Descriptions of the older population's dentition status are usually limited to indicators such as the edentulous proportion, the mean number of restored and missing teeth, and the proportion with a functional dentition, with very few reports describing in detail the nature of the residual dentition. OBJECTIVES: This study described the residual dentition among older New Zealanders living in residential aged care facilities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using national data from the Older People's Oral Health Survey, we determined the residual dentition arrangement and Kennedy classification for each dental arch. Individuals were categorised according to their maxillary-mandibular dental configuration. Data were weighted to make the estimates generalisable to the source population. RESULTS: Among the dentate 45% of the 987 clinically examined participants, the most prevalent configuration was maxillary tooth-bounded saddles against a partially dentate lower (24.7%; 95% CI: 20.4, 29.7). More younger participants generally had less tooth loss experience and had higher prevalence of Kennedy Classes II, III and IV. There were few sex differences, although more females had a fully dentate arch. Marked ethnic differences were observed: Māori were up to eight times as likely to have only mandibular anterior teeth remaining. Upper dentures were worn more than their lower counterpart. Age, sex and ethnic characteristics were associated with particular residual teeth configurations. CONCLUSIONS: Having various degrees of tooth loss was the norm, with the upper tooth-bounded saddles against any partially dentate lower combination most common, and limited to females. An edentulous maxilla opposed by some standing teeth was observed in over one-quarter of the population, and most common among Māori and those who were older. Maxillary prostheses were much more common than mandibular ones. Caring for dentate older people in aged residential care is likely to be complicated by the wide range of dentition configurations. SN - 1741-2358 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31148261/The_residual_dentition_among_New_Zealanders_in_aged_residential_care L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ger.12414 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -