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Inverse association of long-term nut consumption with weight gain and risk of overweight/obesity: a systematic review.
Nutr Res. 2019 08; 68:1-8.NR

Abstract

Nuts contain a variety of nutrients and bioactive compounds that are capable of promoting metabolic health. However, due to their high energy density, concerns have been raised that nut consumption in the long term may contribute to weight gain. This systematic review summarizes the findings of prospective studies regarding the relationship between long-term nut consumption and obesity. Searches were conducted up through February 2018, using the PUBMED, EMBASE, and SCOPUS databases with the relevant MeSH terms and phrases. This systematic review included prospective cohort studies investigating the relationship between consumption of total nut and/or nut subtypes with changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), as well as the risk of overweight/obesity, with follow-up duration ≥1-year. Out of a total of 1580 papers that were initially examined, 6 met the inclusion criteria. Four out of the 6 studies showed an inverse association between nut consumption (typically at the dosages of ≥1 to 2 servings per week) and weight gain and risk of overweight/obesity. The remaining 2 studies evaluated the association between nut intake and changes in WC. From these 2 studies, only one study reported a significant inverse association. Overall, evidence from limited cohort studies demonstrated that long-term nut intake was associated with less weight gain and reduced risk of overweight/obesity. Whether such findings are generalizable to racially diverse ethnic groups, individuals of low socioeconomic status, and populations in developing countries should be addressed in future studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Growth and Development Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: shidfar.f@iums.ac.ir.Department of English Language, School of Health Management and Information Sciences, Center for Educational Research in Medical Sciences (CERMS), Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31151081

Citation

Eslami, Omid, et al. "Inverse Association of Long-term Nut Consumption With Weight Gain and Risk of Overweight/obesity: a Systematic Review." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 68, 2019, pp. 1-8.
Eslami O, Shidfar F, Dehnad A. Inverse association of long-term nut consumption with weight gain and risk of overweight/obesity: a systematic review. Nutr Res. 2019;68:1-8.
Eslami, O., Shidfar, F., & Dehnad, A. (2019). Inverse association of long-term nut consumption with weight gain and risk of overweight/obesity: a systematic review. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 68, 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2019.04.001
Eslami O, Shidfar F, Dehnad A. Inverse Association of Long-term Nut Consumption With Weight Gain and Risk of Overweight/obesity: a Systematic Review. Nutr Res. 2019;68:1-8. PubMed PMID: 31151081.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inverse association of long-term nut consumption with weight gain and risk of overweight/obesity: a systematic review. AU - Eslami,Omid, AU - Shidfar,Farzad, AU - Dehnad,Afsaneh, Y1 - 2019/04/11/ PY - 2018/09/16/received PY - 2019/03/13/revised PY - 2019/04/04/accepted PY - 2019/6/1/pubmed PY - 2020/9/20/medline PY - 2019/6/1/entrez KW - Body mass index KW - Cohort study KW - Nut KW - Obesity KW - Weight gain SP - 1 EP - 8 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 68 N2 - Nuts contain a variety of nutrients and bioactive compounds that are capable of promoting metabolic health. However, due to their high energy density, concerns have been raised that nut consumption in the long term may contribute to weight gain. This systematic review summarizes the findings of prospective studies regarding the relationship between long-term nut consumption and obesity. Searches were conducted up through February 2018, using the PUBMED, EMBASE, and SCOPUS databases with the relevant MeSH terms and phrases. This systematic review included prospective cohort studies investigating the relationship between consumption of total nut and/or nut subtypes with changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), as well as the risk of overweight/obesity, with follow-up duration ≥1-year. Out of a total of 1580 papers that were initially examined, 6 met the inclusion criteria. Four out of the 6 studies showed an inverse association between nut consumption (typically at the dosages of ≥1 to 2 servings per week) and weight gain and risk of overweight/obesity. The remaining 2 studies evaluated the association between nut intake and changes in WC. From these 2 studies, only one study reported a significant inverse association. Overall, evidence from limited cohort studies demonstrated that long-term nut intake was associated with less weight gain and reduced risk of overweight/obesity. Whether such findings are generalizable to racially diverse ethnic groups, individuals of low socioeconomic status, and populations in developing countries should be addressed in future studies. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31151081/Inverse_association_of_long_term_nut_consumption_with_weight_gain_and_risk_of_overweight/obesity:_a_systematic_review_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(18)31066-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -