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How to increase public participation in advance care planning: findings from a World Café to elicit community group perspectives.
BMC Public Health 2019; 19(1):679BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In 2014, Alberta, Canada broke new ground in having the first provincial healthcare policy and procedure for advance care planning (ACP), the process of communicating and documenting a person's future healthcare preferences. However, to date public participation and awareness of ACP remains limited. The aim of this initiative was to elicit community group perspectives on how to help people learn about and participate in ACP.

METHODS

Targeted invitations were sent to over 300 community groups in Alberta (e.g. health/disease, seniors/retirement, social/service, legal, faith-based, funeral planning, financial, and others). Sixty-seven participants from 47 community groups attended a "World Café". Participants moved between tables at fixed time intervals, and in small groups discussed three separate ACP-related questions. Written comments were captured by participants and facilitators. Each comment was coded according to Michie et al.'s Theoretical Domains Framework, and mapped to the Capability, Opportunity and Motivation behavior change system (COM-B) in order to identify candidate intervention strategies.

RESULTS

Of 800 written comments, 76% mapped to the Opportunity: Physical COM-B component of behavior, reflecting a need for access to ACP resources. The most common intervention functions identified pertained to Education, Environmental Restructuring, Training, and Enablement. We synthesized the intervention functions and qualitative comments into eight recommendations for engaging people in ACP. These pertain to access to informational resources, group education and facilitation, health system processes, use of stories, marketing, integration into life events, inclusion of business partners, and harmonization of terminology.

CONCLUSIONS

There was broad support for the role of community groups in promoting ACP. Eight recommendations for engaging the public in ACP were generated and have been shared with stakeholders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Advance Care Planning Collaborative Research and Innovation Opportunities Program (ACP CRIO), University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Advance Care Planning Collaborative Research and Innovation Opportunities Program (ACP CRIO), University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Advance Care Planning Collaborative Research and Innovation Opportunities Program (ACP CRIO), University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Advance Care Planning Collaborative Research and Innovation Opportunities Program (ACP CRIO), University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Covenant Health Palliative Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.Advance Care Planning Collaborative Research and Innovation Opportunities Program (ACP CRIO), University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. jessica.simon@ahs.ca. Departments of Oncology, Medicine, and Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. jessica.simon@ahs.ca.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31159829

Citation

Biondo, Patricia D., et al. "How to Increase Public Participation in Advance Care Planning: Findings From a World Café to Elicit Community Group Perspectives." BMC Public Health, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019, p. 679.
Biondo PD, King S, Minhas B, et al. How to increase public participation in advance care planning: findings from a World Café to elicit community group perspectives. BMC Public Health. 2019;19(1):679.
Biondo, P. D., King, S., Minhas, B., Fassbender, K., & Simon, J. E. (2019). How to increase public participation in advance care planning: findings from a World Café to elicit community group perspectives. BMC Public Health, 19(1), p. 679. doi:10.1186/s12889-019-7034-4.
Biondo PD, et al. How to Increase Public Participation in Advance Care Planning: Findings From a World Café to Elicit Community Group Perspectives. BMC Public Health. 2019 Jun 3;19(1):679. PubMed PMID: 31159829.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How to increase public participation in advance care planning: findings from a World Café to elicit community group perspectives. AU - Biondo,Patricia D, AU - King,Seema, AU - Minhas,Barinder, AU - Fassbender,Konrad, AU - Simon,Jessica E, AU - ,, Y1 - 2019/06/03/ PY - 2018/05/18/received PY - 2019/05/22/accepted PY - 2019/6/5/entrez PY - 2019/6/5/pubmed PY - 2019/8/15/medline KW - Advance care planning KW - Community engagement KW - Community groups KW - Public KW - World Café SP - 679 EP - 679 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: In 2014, Alberta, Canada broke new ground in having the first provincial healthcare policy and procedure for advance care planning (ACP), the process of communicating and documenting a person's future healthcare preferences. However, to date public participation and awareness of ACP remains limited. The aim of this initiative was to elicit community group perspectives on how to help people learn about and participate in ACP. METHODS: Targeted invitations were sent to over 300 community groups in Alberta (e.g. health/disease, seniors/retirement, social/service, legal, faith-based, funeral planning, financial, and others). Sixty-seven participants from 47 community groups attended a "World Café". Participants moved between tables at fixed time intervals, and in small groups discussed three separate ACP-related questions. Written comments were captured by participants and facilitators. Each comment was coded according to Michie et al.'s Theoretical Domains Framework, and mapped to the Capability, Opportunity and Motivation behavior change system (COM-B) in order to identify candidate intervention strategies. RESULTS: Of 800 written comments, 76% mapped to the Opportunity: Physical COM-B component of behavior, reflecting a need for access to ACP resources. The most common intervention functions identified pertained to Education, Environmental Restructuring, Training, and Enablement. We synthesized the intervention functions and qualitative comments into eight recommendations for engaging people in ACP. These pertain to access to informational resources, group education and facilitation, health system processes, use of stories, marketing, integration into life events, inclusion of business partners, and harmonization of terminology. CONCLUSIONS: There was broad support for the role of community groups in promoting ACP. Eight recommendations for engaging the public in ACP were generated and have been shared with stakeholders. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31159829/How_to_increase_public_participation_in_advance_care_planning:_findings_from_a_World_Café_to_elicit_community_group_perspectives L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-019-7034-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -