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Methylotrophs and Methylotroph Populations for Chloromethane Degradation.

Abstract

Chloromethane is a halogenated volatile organic compound, produced in large quantities by terrestrial vegetation. After its release to the troposphere and transport to the stratosphere, its photolysis contributes to the degradation of stratospheric ozone. A better knowledge of chloromethane sources (production) and sinks (degradation) is a prerequisite to estimate its atmospheric budget in the context of global warming. The degradation of chloromethane by methylotrophic communities in terrestrial environments is a major underestimated chloromethane sink. Methylotrophs isolated from soils, marine environments and more recently from the phyllosphere have been grown under laboratory conditions using chloromethane as the sole carbon source. In addition to anaerobes that degrade chloromethane, the majority of cultivated strains were isolated in aerobiosis for their ability to use chloromethane as sole carbon and energy source. Among those, the Proteobacterium Methylobacterium (recently reclassified as Methylorubrum) harbours the only characterisized 'chloromethane utilization' (cmu) pathway, so far. This pathway is not representative of chloromethane-utilizing populations in the environment as cmu genes are rare in metagenomes. Recently, combined 'omics' biological approaches with chloromethane carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation measurements in microcosms, indicated that microorganisms in soils and the phyllosphere (plant aerial parts) represent major sinks of chloromethane in contrast to more recently recognized microbe-inhabited environments, such as clouds. Cultivated chloromethane-degraders lacking the cmu genes display a singular isotope fractionation signature of chloromethane. Moreover, 13CH3Cl labelling of active methylotrophic communities by stable isotope probing in soils identify taxa that differ from the taxa known for chloromethane degradation. These observations suggest that new biomarkers for detecting active microbial chloromethane-utilizers in the environment are needed to assess the contribution of microorganisms to the global chloromethane cycle.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Université de Strasbourg UMR 7156 UNISTRA CNRS, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Genomics, Microbiology (GMGM), Strasbourg, France.

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    Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, Chaire AFERE, INRA, FARE UMR A614, Reims, France.

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    Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF), UMR6296 CNRS-UCA-Sigma, Clermont-Ferrand, France.

    ,

    Institute of Landscape Biogeochemistry - Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research - ZALF, Müncheberg, Germany.

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    Institute of Landscape Biogeochemistry - Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research - ZALF, Müncheberg, Germany.

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    Institute of Earth Sciences, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Center for the Environment HCE, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.

    ,

    Université de Strasbourg UMR 7156 UNISTRA CNRS, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Genomics, Microbiology (GMGM), Strasbourg, France.

    Université de Strasbourg UMR 7156 UNISTRA CNRS, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Genomics, Microbiology (GMGM), Strasbourg, France.

    Source

    Current issues in molecular biology 33: 2019 Jun 05 pg 149-172

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    31166190

    Citation

    Bringel, Françoise, et al. "Methylotrophs and Methylotroph Populations for Chloromethane Degradation." Current Issues in Molecular Biology, vol. 33, 2019, pp. 149-172.
    Bringel F, Besaury L, Amato P, et al. Methylotrophs and Methylotroph Populations for Chloromethane Degradation. Curr Issues Mol Biol. 2019;33:149-172.
    Bringel, F., Besaury, L., Amato, P., Kröber, E., Kolb, S., Keppler, F., ... Nadalig, T. (2019). Methylotrophs and Methylotroph Populations for Chloromethane Degradation. Current Issues in Molecular Biology, 33, pp. 149-172. doi:10.21775/cimb.033.149.
    Bringel F, et al. Methylotrophs and Methylotroph Populations for Chloromethane Degradation. Curr Issues Mol Biol. 2019 Jun 5;33:149-172. PubMed PMID: 31166190.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Methylotrophs and Methylotroph Populations for Chloromethane Degradation. AU - Bringel,Françoise, AU - Besaury,Ludovic, AU - Amato,Pierre, AU - Kröber,Eileen, AU - Kolb,Steffen, AU - Keppler,Frank, AU - Vuilleumier,Stéphane, AU - Nadalig,Thierry, Y1 - 2019/06/05/ PY - 2019/6/6/entrez PY - 2019/6/6/pubmed PY - 2019/6/6/medline SP - 149 EP - 172 JF - Current issues in molecular biology JO - Curr Issues Mol Biol VL - 33 N2 - Chloromethane is a halogenated volatile organic compound, produced in large quantities by terrestrial vegetation. After its release to the troposphere and transport to the stratosphere, its photolysis contributes to the degradation of stratospheric ozone. A better knowledge of chloromethane sources (production) and sinks (degradation) is a prerequisite to estimate its atmospheric budget in the context of global warming. The degradation of chloromethane by methylotrophic communities in terrestrial environments is a major underestimated chloromethane sink. Methylotrophs isolated from soils, marine environments and more recently from the phyllosphere have been grown under laboratory conditions using chloromethane as the sole carbon source. In addition to anaerobes that degrade chloromethane, the majority of cultivated strains were isolated in aerobiosis for their ability to use chloromethane as sole carbon and energy source. Among those, the Proteobacterium Methylobacterium (recently reclassified as Methylorubrum) harbours the only characterisized 'chloromethane utilization' (cmu) pathway, so far. This pathway is not representative of chloromethane-utilizing populations in the environment as cmu genes are rare in metagenomes. Recently, combined 'omics' biological approaches with chloromethane carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation measurements in microcosms, indicated that microorganisms in soils and the phyllosphere (plant aerial parts) represent major sinks of chloromethane in contrast to more recently recognized microbe-inhabited environments, such as clouds. Cultivated chloromethane-degraders lacking the cmu genes display a singular isotope fractionation signature of chloromethane. Moreover, 13CH3Cl labelling of active methylotrophic communities by stable isotope probing in soils identify taxa that differ from the taxa known for chloromethane degradation. These observations suggest that new biomarkers for detecting active microbial chloromethane-utilizers in the environment are needed to assess the contribution of microorganisms to the global chloromethane cycle. SN - 1467-3045 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31166190/Methylotrophs_and_Methylotroph_Populations_for_Chloromethane_Degradation L2 - http://www.caister.com/cimb/vb/v33/149.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -