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Partnering for enhanced digital surveillance of influenza-like disease and the effect of antivirals and vaccines (PEDSIDEA).

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Standardised clinical outcome measures are urgently needed for the surveillance of influenza and influenza-like illness (ILI) based on individual patient data (IPD).

OBJECTIVES

We report a multicentre prospective cohort using a predefined disease severity score in routine care.

PATIENTS/METHODS

The Vienna Vaccine Safety initiative (ViVI) Disease Severity Score ("ViVI Score") was made available as an android-based mobile application to three paediatric hospitals in Berlin and Athens between 2013 and 2016. Healthcare professionals assessed ILI patients at the point of care including severity, risk factors and use of antibiotics/antivirals/vaccines. RT-PCR for influenza A/B viruses was performed at the Hellenic Pasteur Institute and the Robert Koch Institute. PCR testing was blinded to severity scoring and vice versa.

RESULTS

A total of 1615 children aged 0-5 years (54.4% males) were assessed at the three sites. The mean age was 1.7 years (SD 1.5; range 0-5.9). The success rate (completion of the scoring without disruption to the ER workflow) was 100%. ViVI Disease Severity Scores ranged from 0 to 35 (mean 13.72). Disease severity in the Berlin Cohort was slightly higher (mean 15.26) compared to the Athens Cohorts (mean 10.86 and 11.13). The administration of antibiotics was most prevalent in the Berlin Cohort, with 41.2% on antibiotics (predominantly cefuroxime) as opposed to only 0.5% on neuraminidase inhibitors. Overall, Risk-adjusted ViVI Scores were significantly linked to the prescription of both, antibiotics and antivirals.

CONCLUSIONS

The Risk-adjusted ViVI Score enables a precision medicine approach to managing ILI in multicentre settings. Using mobile applications, severity data will be obtained in real time with important implications for the evaluation of antiviral/vaccine use.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Vienna Vaccine Safety Initiative, Berlin, Germany. Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, The University of Nottingham School of Medicine, Nottingham, UK.

    ,

    Department for Interventions in Healthcare Facilities, Hellenic Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Athens, Greece.

    ,

    Third Department of Paediatrics, University General Hospital 'Attikon', National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

    ,

    First Department of Paediatrics, Aghia Sophia Children's Hospital, National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

    ,

    Vienna Vaccine Safety Initiative, Berlin, Germany. Department of Paediatrics, Charité University Medical Centre, Berlin, Germany.

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, The University of Nottingham School of Medicine, Nottingham, UK.

    ,

    National Reference Centre for Influenza, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany.

    Source

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    31169347

    Citation

    Rath, Barbara, et al. "Partnering for Enhanced Digital Surveillance of Influenza-like Disease and the Effect of Antivirals and Vaccines (PEDSIDEA)." Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, vol. 13, no. 4, 2019, pp. 309-318.
    Rath B, Maltezou HC, Papaevangelou V, et al. Partnering for enhanced digital surveillance of influenza-like disease and the effect of antivirals and vaccines (PEDSIDEA). Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2019;13(4):309-318.
    Rath, B., Maltezou, H. C., Papaevangelou, V., Papagrigoriou-Theodoridou, M. A., Alchikh, M., Myles, P., & Schweiger, B. (2019). Partnering for enhanced digital surveillance of influenza-like disease and the effect of antivirals and vaccines (PEDSIDEA). Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, 13(4), pp. 309-318. doi:10.1111/irv.12645.
    Rath B, et al. Partnering for Enhanced Digital Surveillance of Influenza-like Disease and the Effect of Antivirals and Vaccines (PEDSIDEA). Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2019;13(4):309-318. PubMed PMID: 31169347.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Partnering for enhanced digital surveillance of influenza-like disease and the effect of antivirals and vaccines (PEDSIDEA). AU - Rath,Barbara, AU - Maltezou,Helena C, AU - Papaevangelou,Vassiliki, AU - Papagrigoriou-Theodoridou,Maria-Alexandra, AU - Alchikh,Maren, AU - Myles,Puja, AU - Schweiger,Brunhilde, AU - ,, Y1 - 2019/06/06/ PY - 2019/03/14/received PY - 2019/03/15/accepted PY - 2019/6/7/pubmed PY - 2019/6/7/medline PY - 2019/6/7/entrez KW - ILI KW - children KW - disease severity KW - influenza KW - mobile health KW - standardization SP - 309 EP - 318 JF - Influenza and other respiratory viruses JO - Influenza Other Respir Viruses VL - 13 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Standardised clinical outcome measures are urgently needed for the surveillance of influenza and influenza-like illness (ILI) based on individual patient data (IPD). OBJECTIVES: We report a multicentre prospective cohort using a predefined disease severity score in routine care. PATIENTS/METHODS: The Vienna Vaccine Safety initiative (ViVI) Disease Severity Score ("ViVI Score") was made available as an android-based mobile application to three paediatric hospitals in Berlin and Athens between 2013 and 2016. Healthcare professionals assessed ILI patients at the point of care including severity, risk factors and use of antibiotics/antivirals/vaccines. RT-PCR for influenza A/B viruses was performed at the Hellenic Pasteur Institute and the Robert Koch Institute. PCR testing was blinded to severity scoring and vice versa. RESULTS: A total of 1615 children aged 0-5 years (54.4% males) were assessed at the three sites. The mean age was 1.7 years (SD 1.5; range 0-5.9). The success rate (completion of the scoring without disruption to the ER workflow) was 100%. ViVI Disease Severity Scores ranged from 0 to 35 (mean 13.72). Disease severity in the Berlin Cohort was slightly higher (mean 15.26) compared to the Athens Cohorts (mean 10.86 and 11.13). The administration of antibiotics was most prevalent in the Berlin Cohort, with 41.2% on antibiotics (predominantly cefuroxime) as opposed to only 0.5% on neuraminidase inhibitors. Overall, Risk-adjusted ViVI Scores were significantly linked to the prescription of both, antibiotics and antivirals. CONCLUSIONS: The Risk-adjusted ViVI Score enables a precision medicine approach to managing ILI in multicentre settings. Using mobile applications, severity data will be obtained in real time with important implications for the evaluation of antiviral/vaccine use. SN - 1750-2659 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31169347/Partnering_for_enhanced_digital_surveillance_of_influenza-like_disease_and_the_effect_of_antivirals_and_vaccines_(PEDSIDEA) L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/irv.12645 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -