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Influenza vaccination and 1-year risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, pneumonia, and mortality among intensive care unit survivors aged 65 years or older: a nationwide population-based cohort study.
Intensive Care Med. 2019 07; 45(7):957-967.IC

Abstract

PURPOSE

We examined whether influenza vaccination affects 1-year risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, pneumonia, and death among intensive care unit (ICU) survivors aged ≥ 65 years.

METHODS

Danish Intensive Care Database data on all elderly (≥ 65 years) patients hospitalized in Danish ICUs in the period 2005-2015, and subsequently discharged, were linked with data from other medical registries, including data on uptake of the seasonal influenza vaccine. We computed these patients' 1-year risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or pneumonia, and their 1-year risk of all-cause mortality. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using Cox proportional hazards regression, with adjustment and propensity score matching applied to handle confounding.

RESULTS

The study included 89,818 ICU survivors. The influenza vaccinated patients (n = 34,871, 39%) were older, had more chronic diseases, and used more prescription medications than the unvaccinated patients. Adjusted 1-year mortality was decreased among the vaccinated versus the unvaccinated patients (19.3% versus 18.8%; adjusted HR, 0.92; 95% CI 0.89-0.95). Influenza vaccination was also associated with a decreased risk of stroke (adjusted HR, 0.84; 95% CI 0.78-0.92), but only a small, non-significantly decreased risk of myocardial infarction (adjusted HR, 0.93; 95% CI 0.83-1.03). There was no association between vaccination and subsequent hospitalization for heart failure or pneumonia. Propensity score matched analyses confirmed these findings.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with the unvaccinated ICU survivors, the influenza vaccinated ICU survivors had a lower 1-year risk of stroke and a lower 1-year risk of death, whereas no substantial association was observed for the risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction, heart failure, or pneumonia. Our findings support influenza vaccination of individuals aged ≥ 65 years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, 8200, Aarhus N, Denmark. cfc@clin.au.dk.Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, 8200, Aarhus N, Denmark.Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, 8200, Aarhus N, Denmark. Department of Cardiology, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Herning, Denmark.Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, 8200, Aarhus N, Denmark.Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, 8200, Aarhus N, Denmark. Department of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology), Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31187170

Citation

Christiansen, Christian Fynbo, et al. "Influenza Vaccination and 1-year Risk of Myocardial Infarction, Stroke, Heart Failure, Pneumonia, and Mortality Among Intensive Care Unit Survivors Aged 65 Years or Older: a Nationwide Population-based Cohort Study." Intensive Care Medicine, vol. 45, no. 7, 2019, pp. 957-967.
Christiansen CF, Thomsen RW, Schmidt M, et al. Influenza vaccination and 1-year risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, pneumonia, and mortality among intensive care unit survivors aged 65 years or older: a nationwide population-based cohort study. Intensive Care Med. 2019;45(7):957-967.
Christiansen, C. F., Thomsen, R. W., Schmidt, M., Pedersen, L., & Sørensen, H. T. (2019). Influenza vaccination and 1-year risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, pneumonia, and mortality among intensive care unit survivors aged 65 years or older: a nationwide population-based cohort study. Intensive Care Medicine, 45(7), 957-967. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-019-05648-4
Christiansen CF, et al. Influenza Vaccination and 1-year Risk of Myocardial Infarction, Stroke, Heart Failure, Pneumonia, and Mortality Among Intensive Care Unit Survivors Aged 65 Years or Older: a Nationwide Population-based Cohort Study. Intensive Care Med. 2019;45(7):957-967. PubMed PMID: 31187170.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influenza vaccination and 1-year risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, pneumonia, and mortality among intensive care unit survivors aged 65 years or older: a nationwide population-based cohort study. AU - Christiansen,Christian Fynbo, AU - Thomsen,Reimar Wernich, AU - Schmidt,Morten, AU - Pedersen,Lars, AU - Sørensen,Henrik Toft, Y1 - 2019/06/11/ PY - 2019/01/31/received PY - 2019/05/13/accepted PY - 2019/6/13/pubmed PY - 2019/6/13/medline PY - 2019/6/13/entrez KW - Cardiovascular diseases KW - Cohort studies KW - Infection KW - Influenza vaccines KW - Intensive care KW - Mortality SP - 957 EP - 967 JF - Intensive care medicine JO - Intensive Care Med VL - 45 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSE: We examined whether influenza vaccination affects 1-year risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, pneumonia, and death among intensive care unit (ICU) survivors aged ≥ 65 years. METHODS: Danish Intensive Care Database data on all elderly (≥ 65 years) patients hospitalized in Danish ICUs in the period 2005-2015, and subsequently discharged, were linked with data from other medical registries, including data on uptake of the seasonal influenza vaccine. We computed these patients' 1-year risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or pneumonia, and their 1-year risk of all-cause mortality. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using Cox proportional hazards regression, with adjustment and propensity score matching applied to handle confounding. RESULTS: The study included 89,818 ICU survivors. The influenza vaccinated patients (n = 34,871, 39%) were older, had more chronic diseases, and used more prescription medications than the unvaccinated patients. Adjusted 1-year mortality was decreased among the vaccinated versus the unvaccinated patients (19.3% versus 18.8%; adjusted HR, 0.92; 95% CI 0.89-0.95). Influenza vaccination was also associated with a decreased risk of stroke (adjusted HR, 0.84; 95% CI 0.78-0.92), but only a small, non-significantly decreased risk of myocardial infarction (adjusted HR, 0.93; 95% CI 0.83-1.03). There was no association between vaccination and subsequent hospitalization for heart failure or pneumonia. Propensity score matched analyses confirmed these findings. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the unvaccinated ICU survivors, the influenza vaccinated ICU survivors had a lower 1-year risk of stroke and a lower 1-year risk of death, whereas no substantial association was observed for the risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction, heart failure, or pneumonia. Our findings support influenza vaccination of individuals aged ≥ 65 years. SN - 1432-1238 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31187170/Influenza_vaccination_and_1_year_risk_of_myocardial_infarction_stroke_heart_failure_pneumonia_and_mortality_among_intensive_care_unit_survivors_aged_65_years_or_older:_a_nationwide_population_based_cohort_study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-019-05648-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -