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How Race and Gender Stereotypes Influence Help-Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence.
J Interpers Violence. 2021 09; 36(17-18):NP9153-NP9174.JI

Abstract

This qualitative study investigated how stereotypes affect help-seeking behaviors for women in abusive relationships. It consisted of in-depth interviews of 15 female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV): five White and 10 African American women. It compared and contrasted the ways in which internalized stereotypes affected the IPV-related help-seeking of African American women and White women. The findings indicated that African American women were affected by the "strong Black woman" stereotype, did not utilize formal institutions for help, and instead, turned to close family and friends for support. White women were affected by stereotypes about IPV victims, felt less strain associated with utilizing formal support systems, and also utilized informal support networks. Results are interpreted and recommendations are developed through an intersectional Black feminist criminological theoretical framework.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of California Riverside, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31189417

Citation

Monterrosa, Allison E.. "How Race and Gender Stereotypes Influence Help-Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence." Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 36, no. 17-18, 2021, pp. NP9153-NP9174.
Monterrosa AE. How Race and Gender Stereotypes Influence Help-Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence. J Interpers Violence. 2021;36(17-18):NP9153-NP9174.
Monterrosa, A. E. (2021). How Race and Gender Stereotypes Influence Help-Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 36(17-18), NP9153-NP9174. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260519853403
Monterrosa AE. How Race and Gender Stereotypes Influence Help-Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence. J Interpers Violence. 2021;36(17-18):NP9153-NP9174. PubMed PMID: 31189417.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How Race and Gender Stereotypes Influence Help-Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence. A1 - Monterrosa,Allison E, Y1 - 2019/06/13/ PY - 2019/6/14/pubmed PY - 2021/10/15/medline PY - 2019/6/14/entrez KW - help-seeking KW - intimate partner violence KW - stereotypes KW - support networks KW - “strong Black woman” SP - NP9153 EP - NP9174 JF - Journal of interpersonal violence JO - J Interpers Violence VL - 36 IS - 17-18 N2 - This qualitative study investigated how stereotypes affect help-seeking behaviors for women in abusive relationships. It consisted of in-depth interviews of 15 female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV): five White and 10 African American women. It compared and contrasted the ways in which internalized stereotypes affected the IPV-related help-seeking of African American women and White women. The findings indicated that African American women were affected by the "strong Black woman" stereotype, did not utilize formal institutions for help, and instead, turned to close family and friends for support. White women were affected by stereotypes about IPV victims, felt less strain associated with utilizing formal support systems, and also utilized informal support networks. Results are interpreted and recommendations are developed through an intersectional Black feminist criminological theoretical framework. SN - 1552-6518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31189417/How_Race_and_Gender_Stereotypes_Influence_Help_Seeking_for_Intimate_Partner_Violence_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260519853403?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -