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Processing level and diet quality of the US grocery cart: is there an association?
Public Health Nutr. 2019 09; 22(13):2357-2366.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The majority of groceries purchased by US households are industrially processed, yet it is unclear how processing level influences diet quality. We sought to determine if processing level is associated with diet quality of grocery purchases.

DESIGN

We analysed grocery purchasing data from the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey 2012-2013. Household grocery purchases were categorized by the NOVA framework as minimally processed, processed culinary ingredients, processed foods or ultra-processed foods. The energy share of each processing level (percentage of energy; %E) and Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) component and total scores were calculated for each household's purchases. The association between %E from processed foods and ultra-processed foods, respectively, and HEI-2015 total score was determined by multivariable linear regression. Foods purchased by households with the highest v. lowest ultra-processed food purchases and HEI-2015 total score <40 v. ≥60 were compared using linear regression.

SETTING

USA.

PARTICIPANTS

Nationally representative sample of 3961 households.

RESULTS

Processed foods and ultra-processed foods provided 9·2 (se 0·3) % and 55·8 (se 0·6) % of purchased energy, respectively. Mean HEI-2015 score was 54·7 (se 0·4). Substituting 10 %E from minimally processed foods and processed culinary ingredients for ultra-processed foods decreased total HEI-2015 score by 1·8 points (β = -1·8; 95 % CI -2·0, -1·5). Processed food purchases were not associated with diet quality. Among households with high ultra-processed food purchases, those with HEI-2015 score <40 purchased less minimally processed plant-foods than households with HEI-2015 score ≥60.

CONCLUSIONS

Increasing purchases of minimally processed foods, decreasing purchases of ultra-processed foods and selecting healthier foods at each processing level may improve diet quality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, NY, USA.Faculty of Medicine, University Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, NY, USA.School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Center for Epidemiological Studies in Health and Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, NY, USA.College of Health Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, NY, USA. School of Medicine, New York University, 715-719 Broadway, Room 1220, New York, NY10003, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31190676

Citation

Juul, Filippa, et al. "Processing Level and Diet Quality of the US Grocery Cart: Is There an Association?" Public Health Nutrition, vol. 22, no. 13, 2019, pp. 2357-2366.
Juul F, Simões BDS, Litvak J, et al. Processing level and diet quality of the US grocery cart: is there an association? Public Health Nutr. 2019;22(13):2357-2366.
Juul, F., Simões, B. D. S., Litvak, J., Martinez-Steele, E., Deierlein, A., Vadiveloo, M., & Parekh, N. (2019). Processing level and diet quality of the US grocery cart: is there an association? Public Health Nutrition, 22(13), 2357-2366. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980019001344
Juul F, et al. Processing Level and Diet Quality of the US Grocery Cart: Is There an Association. Public Health Nutr. 2019;22(13):2357-2366. PubMed PMID: 31190676.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Processing level and diet quality of the US grocery cart: is there an association? AU - Juul,Filippa, AU - Simões,Bárbara Dos Santos, AU - Litvak,Jacqueline, AU - Martinez-Steele,Euridice, AU - Deierlein,Andrea, AU - Vadiveloo,Maya, AU - Parekh,Niyati, Y1 - 2019/06/13/ PY - 2019/6/14/pubmed PY - 2020/7/28/medline PY - 2019/6/14/entrez KW - Diet quality KW - FoodAPS KW - Healthy Eating Index-2015 KW - NOVA KW - Ultra-processed food SP - 2357 EP - 2366 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 22 IS - 13 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The majority of groceries purchased by US households are industrially processed, yet it is unclear how processing level influences diet quality. We sought to determine if processing level is associated with diet quality of grocery purchases. DESIGN: We analysed grocery purchasing data from the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey 2012-2013. Household grocery purchases were categorized by the NOVA framework as minimally processed, processed culinary ingredients, processed foods or ultra-processed foods. The energy share of each processing level (percentage of energy; %E) and Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) component and total scores were calculated for each household's purchases. The association between %E from processed foods and ultra-processed foods, respectively, and HEI-2015 total score was determined by multivariable linear regression. Foods purchased by households with the highest v. lowest ultra-processed food purchases and HEI-2015 total score <40 v. ≥60 were compared using linear regression. SETTING: USA. PARTICIPANTS: Nationally representative sample of 3961 households. RESULTS: Processed foods and ultra-processed foods provided 9·2 (se 0·3) % and 55·8 (se 0·6) % of purchased energy, respectively. Mean HEI-2015 score was 54·7 (se 0·4). Substituting 10 %E from minimally processed foods and processed culinary ingredients for ultra-processed foods decreased total HEI-2015 score by 1·8 points (β = -1·8; 95 % CI -2·0, -1·5). Processed food purchases were not associated with diet quality. Among households with high ultra-processed food purchases, those with HEI-2015 score <40 purchased less minimally processed plant-foods than households with HEI-2015 score ≥60. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing purchases of minimally processed foods, decreasing purchases of ultra-processed foods and selecting healthier foods at each processing level may improve diet quality. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31190676/Processing_level_and_diet_quality_of_the_US_grocery_cart:_is_there_an_association L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980019001344/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -