Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Searching for the impossible: Parapsychology's elusive quest.
Am Psychol. 2020 04; 75(3):391-399.AP

Abstract

Recently, American Psychologist published a review of the evidence for parapsychology that supported the general claims of psi (the umbrella term often used for anomalous or paranormal phenomena). We present an opposing perspective and a broad-based critique of the entire parapsychology enterprise. Our position is straightforward. Claims made by parapsychologists cannot be true. The effects reported can have no ontological status; the data have no existential value. We examine a variety of reasons for this conclusion based on well-understood scientific principles. In the classic English adynaton, "pigs cannot fly." Hence, data that suggest that they can are necessarily flawed and result from weak methodology or improper data analyses or are Type I errors. So it must be with psi effects. What we find particularly intriguing is that, despite the existential impossibility of psi phenomena and the nearly 150 years of efforts during which there has been, literally, no progress, there are still scientists who continue to embrace the pursuit. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology.Department of Psychology.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31192620

Citation

Reber, Arthur S., and James E. Alcock. "Searching for the Impossible: Parapsychology's Elusive Quest." The American Psychologist, vol. 75, no. 3, 2020, pp. 391-399.
Reber AS, Alcock JE. Searching for the impossible: Parapsychology's elusive quest. Am Psychol. 2020;75(3):391-399.
Reber, A. S., & Alcock, J. E. (2020). Searching for the impossible: Parapsychology's elusive quest. The American Psychologist, 75(3), 391-399. https://doi.org/10.1037/amp0000486
Reber AS, Alcock JE. Searching for the Impossible: Parapsychology's Elusive Quest. Am Psychol. 2020;75(3):391-399. PubMed PMID: 31192620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Searching for the impossible: Parapsychology's elusive quest. AU - Reber,Arthur S, AU - Alcock,James E, Y1 - 2019/06/13/ PY - 2019/6/14/pubmed PY - 2019/6/14/medline PY - 2019/6/14/entrez SP - 391 EP - 399 JF - The American psychologist JO - Am Psychol VL - 75 IS - 3 N2 - Recently, American Psychologist published a review of the evidence for parapsychology that supported the general claims of psi (the umbrella term often used for anomalous or paranormal phenomena). We present an opposing perspective and a broad-based critique of the entire parapsychology enterprise. Our position is straightforward. Claims made by parapsychologists cannot be true. The effects reported can have no ontological status; the data have no existential value. We examine a variety of reasons for this conclusion based on well-understood scientific principles. In the classic English adynaton, "pigs cannot fly." Hence, data that suggest that they can are necessarily flawed and result from weak methodology or improper data analyses or are Type I errors. So it must be with psi effects. What we find particularly intriguing is that, despite the existential impossibility of psi phenomena and the nearly 150 years of efforts during which there has been, literally, no progress, there are still scientists who continue to embrace the pursuit. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved). SN - 1935-990X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31192620/Searching_for_the_impossible:_Parapsychology's_elusive_quest L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/amp/75/3/391 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.