Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The correlation between mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) gene expression and sperm DNA damage among infertile patients with and without varicocele.

Abstract

This study aimed to assess the possible correlation between mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) gene expression and sperm DNA damage among infertile patients with and without varicocele. The study included sixty infertile males and fifty fertile males as controls. The infertile group was subdivided into the following subgroups: thirty males with varicocele and thirty males without varicocele. All subjects underwent medical history collection, clinical examination, semen analysis, sperm DNA integrity assessment, mTOR gene expression assessment and scrotal colour Doppler ultrasound. The mean mTOR gene expression in infertile patients with varicocele (23.52 ± 14.65) was significantly higher than that in infertile patients without varicocele (12.24 ± 12.44) and fertile control subjects (3.92 ± 3.26; p = 0.003 and p < 0.001 respectively). In the infertile varicocele-positive group, mTOR gene expression showed a significant negative correlation with sperm count (p = 0.028, r = -0.400) and progressive sperm motility (p = 0.038, r = -0.381), as well as a significant positive correlation with the sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI; p = 0.001, r = 0.578). In the infertile varicocele-negative group, mTOR gene expression showed a significant negative correlation with progressive sperm motility (p = 0.018, r = -0.429) and a significant positive correlation with sperm DFI (p < 0.001, r = 0.673). In conclusion, according to these results, there is a significant positive correlation between mTOR gene expression and sperm DFI among infertile patients with and without varicocele.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Dermatology, Venereolgy and Andrology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

    ,

    Clinical Pathology Department, South Egypt Cancer Institute, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

    ,

    Dermatology and Andrology Department, Police Hospital, Assiut, Egypt.

    ,

    Clinical Pathology Department, South Egypt Cancer Institute, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

    ,

    Dermatology, Venereolgy and Andrology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

    Dermatology, Venereolgy and Andrology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

    Source

    Andrologia : 2019 Jun 13 pg e13341

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    31195431

    Citation

    Mahran, Ali M., et al. "The Correlation Between Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Gene Expression and Sperm DNA Damage Among Infertile Patients With and Without Varicocele." Andrologia, 2019, pp. e13341.
    Mahran AM, Mosad E, Abdel-Raheem MA, et al. The correlation between mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) gene expression and sperm DNA damage among infertile patients with and without varicocele. Andrologia. 2019.
    Mahran, A. M., Mosad, E., Abdel-Raheem, M. A., Ahmed, E. H., Abdel Motaleb, A. A., & Hofny, E. R. (2019). The correlation between mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) gene expression and sperm DNA damage among infertile patients with and without varicocele. Andrologia, pp. e13341. doi:10.1111/and.13341.
    Mahran AM, et al. The Correlation Between Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Gene Expression and Sperm DNA Damage Among Infertile Patients With and Without Varicocele. Andrologia. 2019 Jun 13;e13341. PubMed PMID: 31195431.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The correlation between mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) gene expression and sperm DNA damage among infertile patients with and without varicocele. AU - Mahran,Ali M, AU - Mosad,Eman, AU - Abdel-Raheem,Mohamed A, AU - Ahmed,Eman H, AU - Abdel Motaleb,Amira Ali, AU - Hofny,Eman R, Y1 - 2019/06/13/ PY - 2018/12/31/received PY - 2019/05/08/revised PY - 2019/05/11/accepted PY - 2019/6/14/entrez PY - 2019/6/14/pubmed PY - 2019/6/14/medline KW - DNA KW - mTOR KW - varicocele SP - e13341 EP - e13341 JF - Andrologia JO - Andrologia N2 - This study aimed to assess the possible correlation between mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) gene expression and sperm DNA damage among infertile patients with and without varicocele. The study included sixty infertile males and fifty fertile males as controls. The infertile group was subdivided into the following subgroups: thirty males with varicocele and thirty males without varicocele. All subjects underwent medical history collection, clinical examination, semen analysis, sperm DNA integrity assessment, mTOR gene expression assessment and scrotal colour Doppler ultrasound. The mean mTOR gene expression in infertile patients with varicocele (23.52 ± 14.65) was significantly higher than that in infertile patients without varicocele (12.24 ± 12.44) and fertile control subjects (3.92 ± 3.26; p = 0.003 and p < 0.001 respectively). In the infertile varicocele-positive group, mTOR gene expression showed a significant negative correlation with sperm count (p = 0.028, r = -0.400) and progressive sperm motility (p = 0.038, r = -0.381), as well as a significant positive correlation with the sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI; p = 0.001, r = 0.578). In the infertile varicocele-negative group, mTOR gene expression showed a significant negative correlation with progressive sperm motility (p = 0.018, r = -0.429) and a significant positive correlation with sperm DFI (p < 0.001, r = 0.673). In conclusion, according to these results, there is a significant positive correlation between mTOR gene expression and sperm DFI among infertile patients with and without varicocele. SN - 1439-0272 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31195431/The_correlation_between_mammalian_target_of_rapamycin_(mTOR)_gene_expression_and_sperm_DNA_damage_among_infertile_patients_with_and_without_varicocele L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/and.13341 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -