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Disparities in hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccination coverage among adult travelers to intermediate or high-risk countries: The role of birthplace and race/ethnicity.
Vaccine. 2019 07 09; 37(30):4111-4117.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

While the hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccine is recommended for United States (US) travelers to endemic regions, vaccination rates are lower among non-US-born adults and some racial minority groups.

PURPOSE

We aimed to examine the relationship between birthplace, race and their interaction as predictors of self-reported HAV vaccination among adult travelers to high-risk countries (HRCs) through analysis of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), 2012-2015.

METHODS

The study included 36,872 US adult participants in the 2012-2015 NHIS who traveled to countries where HAV is endemic. The main outcome was self-reported HAV vaccination (≥2 doses). Complex survey methods were applied to all models to provide statistical estimates that were representative of US adults. Multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, medical, and access-to-care characteristics were fitted to examine the association between birthplace, race, race-by-birthplace (for interaction) and vaccination status.

RESULTS

For adult travelers to HRCs, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of HAV vaccination was lower for non-US-born compared to US-born adults, AOR 0.86 (95% CI; 0.76, 0.98). For Hispanics, the AOR of HAV vaccination was 0.80 (95% CI; 0.70, 0.91) as compared to non-Hispanic-Whites. Furthermore, a significant qualitative interaction between birthplace and race was found (P-value 0.0005). Among non-Hispanic Blacks, the adjusted odds of HAV vaccination for non-US-born adults were 1.35 (95% CI; 1.06, 1.72) times the odds for US-born adults. In contrast, the AORs of HAV vaccination of non-US-born versus US-born adults were 36% (95% CI; 17%, 51%) and 30% (95% CI; 12%, 44%), lower for Asians and Hispanics, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

The association between birthplace and HAV vaccination status differs by race among travelers to HRCs, with US-born non-Hispanic Black and non-US-born Asian and Hispanic adults having lower odds of vaccination. Health care resources should be focused on these target populations to improve travel vaccination compliance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rutgers School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology Piscataway, NJ, USA; Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ, USA; Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Division of Infectious Diseases, New Brunswick, NJ, USA. Electronic address: navan12@pharmacy.rutgers.edu.Rutgers School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology Piscataway, NJ, USA; Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.Rutgers School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology Piscataway, NJ, USA; Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Division of General Surgery, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.Rutgers School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology Piscataway, NJ, USA.Rutgers School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology Piscataway, NJ, USA.Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31196682

Citation

Narayanan, Navaneeth, et al. "Disparities in Hepatitis a Virus (HAV) Vaccination Coverage Among Adult Travelers to Intermediate or High-risk Countries: the Role of Birthplace and Race/ethnicity." Vaccine, vol. 37, no. 30, 2019, pp. 4111-4117.
Narayanan N, Elsaid MI, NeMoyer RE, et al. Disparities in hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccination coverage among adult travelers to intermediate or high-risk countries: The role of birthplace and race/ethnicity. Vaccine. 2019;37(30):4111-4117.
Narayanan, N., Elsaid, M. I., NeMoyer, R. E., Trivedi, N., Zeb, U., & Rustgi, V. K. (2019). Disparities in hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccination coverage among adult travelers to intermediate or high-risk countries: The role of birthplace and race/ethnicity. Vaccine, 37(30), 4111-4117. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.05.071
Narayanan N, et al. Disparities in Hepatitis a Virus (HAV) Vaccination Coverage Among Adult Travelers to Intermediate or High-risk Countries: the Role of Birthplace and Race/ethnicity. Vaccine. 2019 07 9;37(30):4111-4117. PubMed PMID: 31196682.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Disparities in hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccination coverage among adult travelers to intermediate or high-risk countries: The role of birthplace and race/ethnicity. AU - Narayanan,Navaneeth, AU - Elsaid,Mohamed I, AU - NeMoyer,Rachel E, AU - Trivedi,Niti, AU - Zeb,Uroosa, AU - Rustgi,Vinod K, Y1 - 2019/06/10/ PY - 2019/03/04/received PY - 2019/05/22/revised PY - 2019/05/24/accepted PY - 2019/6/15/pubmed PY - 2020/9/8/medline PY - 2019/6/15/entrez KW - Healthcare disparities KW - Hepatitis A KW - Hepatitis A virus KW - Liver disease KW - Travel medicine KW - Vaccination SP - 4111 EP - 4117 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 37 IS - 30 N2 - BACKGROUND: While the hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccine is recommended for United States (US) travelers to endemic regions, vaccination rates are lower among non-US-born adults and some racial minority groups. PURPOSE: We aimed to examine the relationship between birthplace, race and their interaction as predictors of self-reported HAV vaccination among adult travelers to high-risk countries (HRCs) through analysis of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), 2012-2015. METHODS: The study included 36,872 US adult participants in the 2012-2015 NHIS who traveled to countries where HAV is endemic. The main outcome was self-reported HAV vaccination (≥2 doses). Complex survey methods were applied to all models to provide statistical estimates that were representative of US adults. Multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, medical, and access-to-care characteristics were fitted to examine the association between birthplace, race, race-by-birthplace (for interaction) and vaccination status. RESULTS: For adult travelers to HRCs, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of HAV vaccination was lower for non-US-born compared to US-born adults, AOR 0.86 (95% CI; 0.76, 0.98). For Hispanics, the AOR of HAV vaccination was 0.80 (95% CI; 0.70, 0.91) as compared to non-Hispanic-Whites. Furthermore, a significant qualitative interaction between birthplace and race was found (P-value 0.0005). Among non-Hispanic Blacks, the adjusted odds of HAV vaccination for non-US-born adults were 1.35 (95% CI; 1.06, 1.72) times the odds for US-born adults. In contrast, the AORs of HAV vaccination of non-US-born versus US-born adults were 36% (95% CI; 17%, 51%) and 30% (95% CI; 12%, 44%), lower for Asians and Hispanics, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The association between birthplace and HAV vaccination status differs by race among travelers to HRCs, with US-born non-Hispanic Black and non-US-born Asian and Hispanic adults having lower odds of vaccination. Health care resources should be focused on these target populations to improve travel vaccination compliance. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31196682/Disparities_in_hepatitis_A_virus__HAV__vaccination_coverage_among_adult_travelers_to_intermediate_or_high_risk_countries:_The_role_of_birthplace_and_race/ethnicity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(19)30708-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -