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Traumatic Bilateral Luxatio Erecta from a Sliding Injury Down a Ladder; A Rare Case Report and Literature Review.
Bull Emerg Trauma 2019; 7(2):187-191BE

Abstract

Bilateral inferior shoulder dislocations also known as luxatio erecta is an extremely rare injury that is commonly complicated with injuries to the humeral head, glenoid, clavicle, scapula, rotator cuff, capsule, ligaments, brachial plexus, axillary artery and vein. Our patient is a 66-year-old man who presented with both upper extremities above his head in a fixed abducted position after sliding down a ladder approximately 6-meters. Initial radiographs revealed both humeral heads to be located below the glenoid fossa with each humeral shaft parallel to the scapular spines. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a right Hill-Sachs compression fracture (posterolateral humeral head) with a bony Bankart fracture (anteroinferior glenoid) and an avulsion fracture of the left acromion. Successful closed reduction was obtained. Upon follow up, bilateral rotator cuff tears were suspected and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Early recognition, treatment and follow-up is essential to minimize complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Attending Surgeon, Forbes Hospital, Allegheny Health Network, Pennsylvania, USA.Medical Student, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, Pennsylvania, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31198810

Citation

Biswas, Saptarshi, and Ronald Peirish. "Traumatic Bilateral Luxatio Erecta From a Sliding Injury Down a Ladder; a Rare Case Report and Literature Review." Bulletin of Emergency and Trauma, vol. 7, no. 2, 2019, pp. 187-191.
Biswas S, Peirish R. Traumatic Bilateral Luxatio Erecta from a Sliding Injury Down a Ladder; A Rare Case Report and Literature Review. Bull Emerg Trauma. 2019;7(2):187-191.
Biswas, S., & Peirish, R. (2019). Traumatic Bilateral Luxatio Erecta from a Sliding Injury Down a Ladder; A Rare Case Report and Literature Review. Bulletin of Emergency and Trauma, 7(2), pp. 187-191. doi:10.29252/beat-070216.
Biswas S, Peirish R. Traumatic Bilateral Luxatio Erecta From a Sliding Injury Down a Ladder; a Rare Case Report and Literature Review. Bull Emerg Trauma. 2019;7(2):187-191. PubMed PMID: 31198810.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Traumatic Bilateral Luxatio Erecta from a Sliding Injury Down a Ladder; A Rare Case Report and Literature Review. AU - Biswas,Saptarshi, AU - Peirish,Ronald, PY - 2019/6/15/entrez PY - 2019/6/15/pubmed PY - 2019/6/15/medline KW - Bilateral inferior shoulder dislocations KW - Bilateral luxatio erecta KW - Trauma SP - 187 EP - 191 JF - Bulletin of emergency and trauma JO - Bull Emerg Trauma VL - 7 IS - 2 N2 - Bilateral inferior shoulder dislocations also known as luxatio erecta is an extremely rare injury that is commonly complicated with injuries to the humeral head, glenoid, clavicle, scapula, rotator cuff, capsule, ligaments, brachial plexus, axillary artery and vein. Our patient is a 66-year-old man who presented with both upper extremities above his head in a fixed abducted position after sliding down a ladder approximately 6-meters. Initial radiographs revealed both humeral heads to be located below the glenoid fossa with each humeral shaft parallel to the scapular spines. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a right Hill-Sachs compression fracture (posterolateral humeral head) with a bony Bankart fracture (anteroinferior glenoid) and an avulsion fracture of the left acromion. Successful closed reduction was obtained. Upon follow up, bilateral rotator cuff tears were suspected and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Early recognition, treatment and follow-up is essential to minimize complications. SN - 2322-2522 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31198810/Traumatic_Bilateral_Luxatio_Erecta_from_a_Sliding_Injury_Down_a_Ladder L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/31198810/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -